Search:
(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
CrossmanGeorge LyttonLieutenantCROSSMAN, GEORGE LYTTON, Lieutenant, was born 18 February 1877, son of Edward Crossman MD. He was educated at Radley College and at Sandhurst, and joined the Army, as a Second Lieutenant in the West Yorkshire Regiment, 20 February 1897. He was promoted Lieutenant 4 February 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as Staff Officer to Commandant and Railway Staff Officer, Frederickstad; took part in the operations in Natal, 1899; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; in the operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; also during operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900) and action at Pieter's Hill; in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); in the Transvaal, east and west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; again in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "George Lytton Crossman, Lieutenant, The Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment). In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Captain 26 May 1904; was Adjutant of the 2nd West Yorkshire Regiment from 1 November 1904 to 31 October 1907, and was Officer of a Company of Gentleman Cadets, Royal Military College, 26 January 1908 to 25 January 1912. Serving in the European War, Captain Crossman held the following Staff appointments, viz: Staff Captain, 21st Infantry Brigade, BEF, 13 November 1914 to 15 April, 1915; Brigade Major, 21st Infantry Brigade, BEF, British Armies in France, 16 April 1915 to 13 July 1916 (promoted to Major 1 September 1915); GSO2, 30th Division, British Armies in France, 14 July 1916 to 16 February 1917; GSO2, 7th Army Corps, British Armies in France, 17 February to 10 November 1917; GS01, Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps, British Armies in France, 11 November 1917 to 31 March, 1918; employed under the Air Ministry 1 to 11 April, 1918; GSO1, 59th Division, British Armies in France, 14 April to 20 September 1918; GSO1, 5th Army, British Armies in France, 21 September to 13 November 1918; GSO, No 1 Tank Group, British Armies in France, 14 November 1918 to 11 February 1919; GSO, GHQ, British Armies in France, 12 to 27 February 1919. He was created a CMG in 1916, and given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 3 June, 1918. Lieutenant Colonel Crossman married, in 1914, Julia Mary Anne, eldest daughter of Reverend J J Tapson, Vicar of Hooe, South Devon.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince of Wales's Own) West Yorkshire Regiment
CullumG CCaptainCULLUM, G C, Captain, served in the South African War, 1899-1902, with the Duke of Edinburgh's Own Volunteer Rifles (Cape of Good Hope). He was present in operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, October 1899, to May 1900; operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River, May to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, 30 November 1900 to May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches twice [London Gazette, 7 May and 20 August 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with a clasp, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "G C Cullum, Captain, Duke of Edinburgh's Own Volunteer Rifles. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
DEOVR
CuninghameThomas Andrew Alexander MontgoLieutenantCUNINGHAME, SIR THOMAS ANDREW ALEXANDER MONTGOMERY, Lieutenant, was born 30 March 1877, elder son of Major Sir William James Montgomery Cuninghame, VC (late Rifle Brigade), and Elizabeth, youngest daughter of Edward Bouchier Hartopp, of Dalby Hall, near Melton Mowbray. He was educated at Eton and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; was commissioned in the Rifle Brigade 17 February 1897, and became Lieutenant 15 March 1899. He served in South Africa, 1899-1902, as Brigade Signalling Officer 18 April to 31 July 1900, and as Staff Captain (Intelligence) 1 August 1900 to 5 November 1903; at the Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz (severely wounded); took part in the operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; afterwards on Staff. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Sir Thomas Andrew Alexander Montgomery Cuninghame, Lieutenant, Rifle Brigade. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC, Transvaal, 3 February 1903, and presented by the GOC at Pretoria 25 March 1903. He was promoted to Captain 18 January 1902; was Staff Captain, 5th Division, Irish Command, 2 April 1908 to 15 January 1909; DAQMG, 5th Division, Irish Command, 16 January 1909 to 1 April 1912; Military Attache (GSO), Vienna and Cettinje, 9 August 1912 to 6 September 1914. He served in the European War from 1914; was GSO2, attached French Army, 7 September to 7 December 1914; GSO2, 1st Army Corps, BEF, 8 December 1914 to 17 February 1915; Temp. Lieutenant Colonel and Military Attache, Athens (temporary), 21 February 1915 to 25 March 1916; GSO1, 68th Division, Home Forces, 17 May 1916 to 22 October 1917; GSO1, School of Instruction, British Armies in France, 16 October 1918; GSO1, British Military Representative in Austria, 5 December 1918. He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1919. He succeeded his father in 1897, and is the 10th Baronet (created 1872) of Corsehill, Ayrshire, and Kirktonholm, in Lanarkshire. Sir Thomas Cuninghame married, in 1904, Alice Frances Denison, eldest daughter of Sir G William Des Voeux, GCMG, and granddaughter of Sir J Pender, and they had one son, Alexander William Henry James, born 28 October 1905, and one daughter.
DSO, QSA (5) CC OFS RofL Trans L-N (Capr Sir, RB), KSA (2) (Capt Sir, DSO, RB) 1914 Star (Maj Sir Bt DSO RB), BWM (Lt Col Sir), Victory Medal with MID (Lt Col Sir), Distinguished Service Medal (USA), Croix de Guerre with palm (France), War Cross (Czechoslovakia) Legion dHonneur (France) 3rd Class, Order of George 1 (Greece) 2nd Class, Order of the Redeemer (Greece) 3rd Class. Glendinings 1990 est £1500-2000. Liverpool 1994 £3500. Spinks 1999 (no sale).
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince Consort's Own) Rifle Brigade
CurryMontagu CreightonMajorCURRY, MONTAGU CREIGHTON, Major, was born 18 February 1856. He entered the 11th Foot as Second Lieutenant, from the Militia, 13 October 1877; became Lieutenant, Devonshire Regiment, 25 July 1878; was Adjutant, Devonshire Regiment, 18 July 1885 to 28 July 1890; Second Class Inspector of Warlike Stores 29 July 1890 to 9 April, 1894; was promoted to Captain 24 March 1897. He served on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98, with the Tirah Expeditionary Force, and was present at the capture of the Arhanga and Sampagha Passes (Medal and two clasps). Captain Curry served in the South African War from 1899 to 1901, taking part in the operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Elandslaagte, Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop. He was present at the defence of Ladysmith, including the action of 6 January 1900; acted as Station Commandant. He took part in the operations in the Transvaal, June to July 1900. He was in command of Imperial Light Infantry 19 June 1900 to 30 July 1901, taking part in the operations in the Orange River Colony, May 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches by Sir G White, 2 December 1899, and 23 March, 1900, and by Sir R H Buller, 9 November 1900 [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Montagu Creighton Curry, Major (Local Lieutenant Colonel), Devonshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He became Lieutenant Colonel, Lincolnshire Regiment, 11 March, 1902; was given the Brevet of Colonel 11 March, 1905; became Colonel 23 February 1907; commanded No 4 District, and was in charge of Records, 1909 to 1913; was created a CB in 1911, and retired on 18 February 1913. Colonel Curry became Temporary Brigadier General 7 September 1914. He was given the honorary rank of Brigadier General 11 April, 1917, and created a CBE in 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Devonshire Regiment
CurtisReginald SalmondMajorCURTIS, REGINALD SALMOND, Major, was born 21 November 1863, eldest son of Major General Reginald Curtis, RA. He was educated at Cheltenham College, and at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich; was commissioned in the Royal Engineers, as Lieutenant, 28 July 1883; was employed in the Egyptian Army 11 February 1891 to 19 February 1893; became Captain 31 December 1891. He served in the Eastern Sudan in 1891, including the capture of Tokar (Bronze Star with clasp; 4th Class Medjidie). He served in the Ashanti Expedition, 1895-96, as Director of Telegraphs (Star; Brevet of Major 25 March, 1896; mentioned in Despatches); was specially employed at Headquarters of Army 1 April, 1897 to 29 January 1899; in the Falkland Islands, under the Admiralty, 30 January 1899 to 13 August 1899, and at HQ of Army 14 August 1899 to 8 October 1899; was ADC to Major General RE, South Africa, 9 October 1899 to 1 August 1900; became Major 12 August 1900; was Assistant Director of Telegraphs, and also employed as Chief Staff Officer with the South African Constabulary 27 November 1900 to 20 August 1905. He was present at the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including the operations at Paardeberg (19 to 26 February), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria. Operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to October 1900, including action at Belfast (26 and 27 August) Operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900. Operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River. Operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; King's Medal with two clasps, and was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Reginald Salmond Curtis, Major and Local Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Engineers. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the Duke of Cornwall and York in South Africa 14 August 1901. He was a Member of the International Council of the Transvaal, ORC, 1904-08; was Inspector-General, SA Constabulary, 21 August 1905 to 31 December 1908; became Lieutenant Colonel 26 May 1908; was Commandant, Army Signal School, 12 August 1912 to 31 March, 1913; became Colonel 1 April, 1913; created a CMG 1913; was AAG for the Royal Engineers, War Office, from 1 April 1913 to 23 February 1917; created a CB, 1915; promoted Major General 1 January 1916, for valuable services rendered in connection with the European War, from 1914, and created a KCMG in 1917. He commanded Cromarty Garrison 18 July 1917 to 4 October 1917; Major General, Aldershot Command, 5 October 1917. Sir Reginald Curtis married, in 1894, the Honourable Hilda Margaret, youngest daughter of the 9th Viscount Barrington, and Mary Isabella (who died in 1903), daughter of the Reverend Richard Bogue, and they had three daughters.
Ashanti Star, Khedives Star Tokar Order of the Medjidie (Turkey) 3rd Class. (Entitled to KCMG, CB (m), DSO, Egypt, QSA (5), KSA (2), 1914 Star, BWM, Victory Medal. RE Regimental Museum 1992.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
CuthbertJames HaroldLieutenantCUTHBERT, JAMES HAROLD, Lieutenant, was born 21 July 1876, at Melster, Pietermaritzburg, Natal, son of Sidney Cuthbert, of Melster, Pietermaritzburg (second son of William Cuthbert, of Beaufront Castle, Hexham, Northumberland), and Frances Yates Griffin, daughter of J Griffin, of Pietermaritzburg, Natal; was educated at Sandroyd, Eton and Sandhurst; joined the Scots Guards 12 August 1896; served as Lieutenant in South Africa, 1899-1902; was extra ADC to the GOC, 1st Division, in the advance on Kimberley, and was present at the actions of Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein (Despatches); took part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River and Zand River; participated in operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions at Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill; in operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to November, including action at Belfast; operations, west of Pretoria, and in the Orange River Colony. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 March, 1900]: "... Having shown considerable coolness in taking a message from Lord Methuen to the Gordon Highlanders", was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "James Harold Cuthbert, Lieutenant, Scots Guards. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief, South Africa, and presented 14 August 1901. He was appointed High Sheriff of Northumberland in 1911. On the outbreak of the European War he rejoined the 1st Battalion Scots Guards (from the Reserve of Officers), in France, 15 April, 1915. He was reported as wounded and missing 27 September 1915, and finally, on 7 May 1917, was reported as having been killed on 27 September 1915. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 1 January 1916]. He won the Army Revolver Championship in 1904, and published 'The 1st Battalion Scots Guards in South Africa, 1899-1902'. He married (1st) Anne Dorothy Frederica Byng, third daughter of the 5th Earl of Strafford, at Wrotham Park Private Chapel, 24 September 1903. She died in January 1907. (2ndly). Kathleen Alice Straker, elder daughter of John Straker, of Stagshaw Corbridge, Northumberland, at Hexham Abbey, 12 October 1908, and there were three sons: Harold David, born 11 September 1909; Gerald Ivor, born 25 January 1912; Sidney John, born 13 January 1914, and one daughter, Vida, born 24 December 1910.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Scots Guards
DallimoreJosephCaptainDALLIMORE, P JOSEPH, Captain, was born 24 March 1871, son of Peter Dallimore.  He served in the South African War of 1899-1902; was mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Joseph Dallimore, Captain, 5th Victorian Mounted Rifles.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to the Colonial Office 10 December 1902.  He married, in 1899, Beatrice Mary, daughter of G A Wiggs. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Victoria contingent
DalmahoyPatrick CarfraeSecond LieutenantDALMAHOY, PATRICK CARFRAE, Second Lieutenant, was born 31 October 1872, at Edinburgh, son of Major General Patrick Carfrae Dalmahoy and Emily Jane Dalmahoy, daughter of Edward Wylly, Bengal Civil Service.  His father fought in the Indian Mutiny, and was present at the siege and capture of Delhi.  He was educated at Haileybury College, and Edinburgh University and passed as Writer to the Signet, Edinburgh, in 1890.  He joined the Mounted infantry, City Imperial Volunteers, as a Private, for service in the South African War, 18 January 1899 and was employed with them until gazetted to a commission in 1900 in the 1st Battalion The Royal Scots, with whom he served to the end of the war.  Major-General Dalmahoy writes: "I have not in my possession any written account of the deed that won for him the DSO, but I have been told on more than one occasion by Colonel Douglas (now General Sir Willian Douglas), who commanded the column that the success was in a great measure accomplished by the tactful and dashing action of the company, Royal Scots, under my son's command.  The scene was the Battle of Bermondsey, in the Transvaal 1901, I think.  By order of Colonel Douglas the company was detached to turn the Boer right, and this he fully effected.  He was severely wounded.  I am told that he was specially mentioned by Lord Kitchener.  I may mention that my son never in any way alluded to his action, and it was only through Sir William Douglas that I heard of it".  Second Lieutenant Dalmahoy was twice wounded; was mentioned in Despatches, awarded the King's and Queen's Medals, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Patrick Carfrae Dalmahoy, Second Lieutenant, The Royal Scots (Lothian) Regiment.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He resigned his commission at the end of the war, and was appointed to the Civil Service in South Africa.  He was Assistant Resident Magistrate at Germiston, then Resident Magistrae at Benoni, Transvaal, and then Resident Magistrate at Heidelberg, Transvaal.  His favourite pastime was golf.  He married, 25 October 1911, at Edinburgh, Mabel Houston, daughter of W Rogers, of Johannesburg and they had three children: Emily Muriel, born 18 October 1912; Mabel Lilias Jane, born 4 October 1914, and Frances Diana Maud, born 13 October 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment)
Dalrymple-HayJames Reginald MaitlandMajorDALRYMPLE-HAY, JAMES REGINALD MAITLAND, Major and Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, was born 30 July 1858, son of Colonel G J Dalrymple-Hay, BSC, and of Amelia Emily, daughter of Colonel H D Maitland.  He was educated at the Edinburgh Academy and University, and joined the 21st Royal Scots Fusiliers as Second Lieutenant, from the Militia, 1 November 1879.  He served in the South African War, 1880-81; took part in the Transvaal campaign at the siege of Potchefatroom (wounded; mentioned in Despatches).  He became Lieutenant, Royal Scots Fusiliers, 1 July 1881; transferred to the West India Regiment 21 April, 1886; promoted to Captain on 5 February 1890; was Adjutant, 4th (Volunteer Battalion) Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 1892-96; became Major 7 May 1895.  He served in West Africa, 1897-98; Lagos, employed in Hinterland (Despatches [London Gazette, 7 March, 1899]; Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 8 July 1899; Medal with clasp).  He took part in the operations in Sierra Leone, 1898-99 (clasp).  He served in the South African War, 1899-1901, as Special Service Officer; afterwards on Staff (AAG), and subsequently District Commissioner and District Commandant.  He served during the operations in Cape Colony, March to April, 1900; in Natal, April to June, 1900; in the Transvaal, June, 1900 to June, 1901; also in Cape Colony, June to November 1901.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "James Reginald Maitland Dalrymple-Hay, Major and Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, West India Regiment.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa".  He became Lieutenant Colonel 4 September 1901.  He commanded troops in St Lucia, February to December 1902, and was Acting Administrator of the island, May-November 1902; commanded 2nd West India Regiment 1904-7; was given the Brevet of Colonel [London Gazette, 25 October 1904].  Colonel Dalrymple-Hay was wounded in the Jamaica earthquake, 1907.  He was created a CB 24 June 1910, and was Brigadier General, Inspector of West Indian Local Forces and Officer Commanding the troops in Jamaica 27 August 1910 to 16 September 1914.  In the European War he commanded Infantry Brigades (Home; East Coast), 28 November 1914 to 27 February 1917.  He was mentioned in Despatches 26 February 1916, and retired 27 February 1917, as Honourable Brigadier General.  His service overseas in the European War was: Special Appointment, Commandant 6th Corps Troops, BEF, which he held up to 13 February 1917.  He vacated this appointment owing to disability.  General Dalrymple-Hay married, in 1892, Catherine Margaret, daughter of Henry Billinghurst, late of Stedham Hall.  Sussex. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
West India Regiment
DalyPatrick JosephLieutenantDALY, PATRICK JOSEPH, Lieutenant, was born in 1872, son of James Daly, of Alstonville, Richmond River, New South Wales, and Mrs Daly.  He served in South Africa with the West Australian Contingent, 1901-2; became Lieutenant 18 January 1902; was present in operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony.  He was severely wounded; was five times mentioned in Despatches; received the South African Medal with clasps and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Patrick Joseph Daly, Lieutenant, Western Australia.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He was confirmed in the rank of Lieutenant as honorary rank on retiring after the South African War.  He became Lieutenant, 103rd Regiment of Canada 21 February 1915, and served in the European War from 1915 to 1917, rising to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.  He was created a CMG in 1917. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
West Australia contingent
DamantFrederick HughMajorDAMANT, FREDERICK HUGH, Major, was born in the District of King William's Town, South Africa, in 1864, youngest son of Hugh Atherstone Damant.  He served in South Africa, 1899-1904, in the famous corps commanded by Major M F Rimington, known as Rimington's Guides, and later as Damant's Horse.  In any history of the South African War the doings of Rimington's Guides are related at considerable length, and the official record of General Rimington's services as given in the Army List gives some faint idea of the extent of his services and of the services of his Guides: 'South African War, 1899-1902.  Special Service Officer, and in command Rimington's Guides.  Advance on Kimberley, including action at Enslin.  Afterwards in command of a column from 6 May 1901.  Despatches [London Gazette, 4 May 1900; 8 February 1901 (Lord Roberts, 31 March, 1900; Sir A Hunter, 4 August 1900)], and Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901:17 January and 29 July 1902]; Brevet of Colonel; Queen's Medal with eight clasps, King's Medal with two clasps; created a CB'.  Major Damant served during the Siege of Kimberley, in command of a mounted section of the Town Guard Station at Otto's Kopje.  After the Relief of Kimberley he served with Rimington's Guides, and in 1901 was appointed to command them.  In the same year the name of the Guides was changed to Damant's Horse.  Shortly afterwards Major Damant commanded a column in the Orange Free State, and was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel.  In a desperate struggle with 800 Boers he received five bullet wounds, but succeeded in saving the guns entrusted to his charge; later he took part in operations in the Western Transvaal until the cessation of hostilities.  Sir A Conan Doyle tells us at length ('The Great Boer War', pages 511-512) about Damant's desperate encounter with 800 Boers.  A portion of De Wet's force had been harassing the block-house builders, and three bodies, under Damant, Rimington and Wilson, were at once despatched to clear away the enemy.  The British line had become extended over many miles, and was dangerously weak in the centre, where "Colonel Damant and his small staff were alone with the two guns and the Maxim, save for a handful of Imperial Yeomanry (91st), who acted as escort to the guns.  Across the face of this small force there rode a body of men in khaki uniforms, keeping British formation, and actually firing bogus volleys from time to time in the direction of some distant Boers".  Damant and his staff seem to have mistaken these Boers for some of Rimington's men.  In a few minutes the enemy were over the kopje where the guns stood, and had ridden among the gunners, supported in their attack by a flank fire from a number of dismounted riflemen.  As soon as Damant, his Staff and the escort of forty Yeomen realized the danger, they dashed for the crest of the kopje, but the Boers had already overwhelmed the gunners.  In the ensuing conflict Damant was hit in five places, "all of his Staff were wounded, and hardly a man of the small body of Yeomanry was left standing.  Nothing could exceed their gallantry.  Gaussen, their Captain, fell at their head.  On the ridge the men about the guns were nearly all killed or wounded.  Of the gun detachment only two men remained, both of them hit, and Jeffcoat, their dying Captain, bequeathed them fifty pounds each in a will drawn up on the spot.  In half an hour the centre of the British line had been absolutely annihilated".  However, the wide spread British wings had begun to realize that something was wrong.  An officer on the far right brought up his squadron and Scott's squadron of Damant's Horse to the rescue.  Rimington's men came up, on the other side, and the Boers rode off, leaving the guns behind them.  The Boers were dressed in British uniforms, and wore the tiger-skin, the badge of Damant's Horse, round their hats.  Sir A Conan Doyle says that in the last three months of 1901, as the block-house system developed, the small bands of Boers found it increasingly difficult to escape from the British columns, who were for ever at their heels.  "Of the column commanders, Williams, Damant, Du Moulin, Lowry Cole and Wilson were the most successful.  In their operations they were much aided by the South African Constabulary".  For his services in this campaign Major Damant was created a CB in 1902, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order ("London Gazette, 10 September 1901]: "Frederick Hugh (first-gazetted as JH) Damant, Major, Rimington's Guides.  For excellent work in the command of a column in Orange River Colony".  The Warrant and Insignia were sent out to South Africa, and presented to Lieutenant Colonel Damant by Brigadier General E O F Hamilton, at Heilbron, 12 March, 1902.  Lieutenant Colonel Damant afterwards became Resident Magistrate for the District of Lydenberg, Transvaal.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Rimington's Guides
DanielCharles JamesCaptainDANIEL, CHARLES JAMES, Captain, was born in York 1 November 1861, son of Reverend R Daniel, BD, Vicar of Osbaldwick, York, and of Mrs Daniel, of Jevington Gardens, Eastbourne.  He was educated at St Peter's School, York, and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; joined the Army 10 May 1882.  He served in the Zhob Valley Expedition, 1884.  He was appointed Adjutant, 3rd Battalion King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment from 23 January 1900, and served in the South African War, 1899-1902; during operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; taking part in the operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, March to May 1900; serving during operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to September 1901; in the operations in Cape Colony, September 1901 to January 1902.  He was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal and two clasps; the King's Medal and two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Charles James Daniel, Captain, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 12 March, 1902, and the Warrant sent 19 March, 1902.  He retired with the rank of Major 27 June, 1903.  He served during the European War as Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, in charge of No 1 Record Office, Preston, and was created Commander of the Order of the British Empire 1 January 1919.  He married, 6 April, 1891, in Jersey, Agnes Margaret, elder daughter of  Admiral T Saumarez, CB, and they had one son, Charles, born 23 June, 1894 (Lieutenant, RN), and one daughter, Dorothy.
CBE (1st m), DSO, QSA (2) CC OFS (Capt 3 R Lancs), KSA (2) (Capt DSO R Lancs).  DMD 1994 £1050
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Loyal North Lancashire Regiment
DaniellEdward Henry EdwinCaptainDANIELL, EDWARD HENRY EDWIN, Captain, was born 5 June, 1868.  He was gazetted to the Royal Irish Regt, 9 April, 1892; became Lieutenant 27 June, 1894, and served on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98, taking part in the operations on the Samana (Medal with two clasps).  He became Captain 28 October 1899, and served in the South African War, 1899-1902.  He took part in operations in the Orange Free State, March to May 1900; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, August to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August), and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September); operations in Orange River Colony, May to August 1900, including actions at Bethlehem (6 and 7 July) and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in Capt Colony, south of Orange River, 1900, including actions at Colesberg (25 January to 12 February).  He was Assistant Provost-Marshal 16 October 1900, to 5 March 1901 and was afterwards employed with Damant's Horse (formerly Rimington's Guides).  He was present at operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to May 1901, and March 1902 to 31 May 1902, and at operations in Orange River Colony, May 1901 to March, 1902.  Captain Daniell was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901 and 29 July 1902]; was placed on the list of Officers considered qualified for Staff employment in consequence of service on the Staff in the Field, received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 Sept, 1901]: "Edward Henry Edwin Daniell, Captain, Royal Irish Regiment.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented to him by the King 29 October 1901.  He was Adjutant of the Royal Irish Regiment 1 June 1902 to 30 May 1903; appointed DAAG, North China, 11 August 1903 to 31 October 1905; DAA and QMG, North China, 1 November 1905 to 13 August 1907; was promoted to Major 28 August 1909; employed on General Staff (3rd Grade), Army Headquarters and War Office, 15 October 1909 to 25 November 1911; appointed GSO (3rd Grade), Malta, 26 November 1911.  During the European War he proceeded to France with the battalion; was promoted to Temporary Lieutenant Colonel from 26 September 1914, and believed killed in action 19 October 1914, at the capture of the village of Le Pilly by the regiment.  (Despatches Sir John French 8 October 1914).  Married, in 1904, Winifred, only daughter of Percival Currey, and they had one son and one daughter.  He was a nephew of Major Daniell (late Royal Munster Fusiliers), of the Royal Hospital, Chelsea.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Irish Regiment
DarleyHenry ReadCaptainDARLEY, HENRY READ, Captain, was born 13 June, 1865, son of J F Darley, of Leeson Park, Dublin.  He served in the South African War as ADC to Lord Chesham.  He was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's and King's Medals with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Henry Read Darley, Captain, Imperial Yeomanry, ADC.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901.  He became Major, Reserve of Officers (late Captain, 4th Dragoon Guards), and was awarded the OBE.  Major Darley was a Barrister-at-Law, Inner Temple.  He married, in 1893, Emily, daughter of the Honourable John Prendergast Vereker, and they had four sons.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Yeomanry
DarlingHerbert FergusonLieutenantDARLING, HERBERT FERGUSON, Lieutenant, was born 24 April, 1879, son of Robert Darling, of Gerardton, West Australia.  He joined the West Australian Military Forces; served in the South African War, 1899— 1902; was slightly wounded, and was present at the operations in the Orange Free State, including the actions at Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill; operations in Natal; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, including actions at Belfast and Rhenoster Kop; operations in Orange River Colony.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901, and 29 August 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "H F Darling, Lieutenant, West Australian Mounted Infantry.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia, etc, were sent to South Africa and presented there.  He was appointed Honourable Captain, West Australian Infantry Regiment, 30 June, 1912.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
West Australia contingent
DauntRichard Algernon CraigieLieutenantDAUNT, RICHARD ALGERNON CRAIGIE, Lieutenant, was born 1 October 1872, at Dawlish, Devon, son of  Lieutenant Colonel Richard Daunt, of County Cork, and of Charlotte Isabella Craigie.  He was educated at Haileybury College; joined the Royal Irish Rifles, as Second Lieutenant, 7 March 1894; became Lieutenant 1 February 1897; served with the Royal Irish Rifles in Malta, India, Ireland and South Africa.  In the South African War he served from 1899 to 1902, on the Staff, as Divisional Signalling Officer, 3rd Division, South African Field Force, 1900.  He took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900.  Operations in the Orange River Colony, May to November 1900.  Operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899 to 1900; Transvaal, 1900 to 1902.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with eight clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Richard Algernon Craigie Daunt, Lieutenant, Royal Irish Rifles.  For services during operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented there.  He became Captain 11 October 1902.  He was Adjutant of Militia and Special Reserve 2 January 1904 to 1 January 1909, and was promoted to Major 5 September 1912.  He served in the European War from 1914; commanded, as Major, the 2nd Royal Irish Rifles, from 18 September 1914; became Temporary Lieutenant Colonel 19 October 1914, and Lieutenant Colonel 27 May 1915.  He was present at Mons, Le Gateau, the Marne and the Aisne, and the First Battle of Ypres; was invalided with shell-shock 4 October 1914; served in Flanders, June 1915 to 28 February 1916; was invalided to England, March 1916; returned to France, April 1917, and commanded the 1st Royal Irish Rifles till 27 June 1917.  He returned to England on account of ill health 30 August 1917.  Lieutenant Colonel Daunt was a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society.  He married, 4 February 1903, at Tarporley, Cheshire, Ellen Georgina Ferozepore, daughter of  Captain Cooper, Suffolk Regiment, and they had two children: Richard Hubert, born 31 December 1903, and Moira Bridget. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Irish Rifles
DavidsonCharles John LloydMajorDAVIDSON, CHARLES JOHN LLOYD, Major, was born 6 October 1858, eldest son of James Davidson, of Eglinton, County Derry, and of Murlingden, Brechin, and Margaret Jane Lloyd, of Summerhill, Londonderry, daughter of Minchin Lloyd, of Summerhill, Londonderry.  He was educated privately, and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; entered the 27th Inniskilling Regiment 13 August 1879; was promoted Captain 1 February 1888.  He was promoted Major 24 October 1899 and took part in the South African War, 1899-1902, when he was severely wounded at Inniskilling Hill (Pieter's Hill) on 23 February 1900.  Major Davidson was present at the operations during the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900 and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz.  He was also present during the operations in the Transvaal, to the east of Pretoria, from July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September).  He was afterwards Commandant at Lindley; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to February 1901, and May to December 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, December 1901 to 31 May 1902.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Charles John Lloyd Davidson, Major, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 18 December 1902; the Warrant sent 8 January 1903.  He was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 3 November 1906.  He was given the Brevet of Colonel 3 November 1909, and retired from, the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers with the rank of Colonel 3 November 1910.  He married (1st) in 1890, Sophia Mary (died 1897), the daughter of Major Burleigh Stuart, of Dergmony, Omagh.  He married (secondly), in 1906, Mary Nathalie (who died in 1916), daughter of  Colonel A B Cumberlege, of Kingsfield, Southwick, Sussex, and they had two sons: Claude John Lloyd and Kenneth Bulstrode Lloyd, born on 30 September 1907, and 7 December 1908, and one daughter, Christine Rosemary. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers
DavidsonGeorge HarryCaptainDAVIDSON, GEORGE HARRY, Captain, was born 16 September 1866, at Inveresk House, Inveresk,  Midlothian, son of Archibald Davidson, grandson of Reverend Dr Davidson, of Muirhouse and Hatton, Midlothian, late Sheriff of the Lothians and Peebles.  He was educated at Wellington College.  He was commissioned in the Royal Scots 4 May 1887, becoming Lieutenant 12 October 1889, and serving in Zululand with the Mounted Infantry.  From 21 August 1894 to 19 February 1898, he was Adjutant, Royal Scots, and from 21 February 1898 to 20 February 1903, Adjutant, Militia and he was promoted to Captain 14 March, 1899.  Captain Davidson served in South Africa, 1900-2, as Adjutant, 3rd Battalion Royal Scots, from 28 March, 1900.  He was present in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including the action at Venterskroon (9 August); operations in Orange River Colony May to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900; operations in Orange River Colony from 31 November 1900.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "George Harry Davidson, Captain, Royal Scots.  In recognition of services during the operations in Cape Colony".  The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to the OC, Scottish District, Edinburgh, 16 June, 1902, and presented by Colonel A Broadwood 19 June, 1902.  He was promoted to Major 14 August 1904, and retired from the Royal Scots 8 October 1910, entering the Reserve of Officers.  Major Davidson married 12 August 1891, at Claremont, Cape Colony, Ethel Maud Fairbairn, daughter of James Fairbairn, of Ledgerwood, Claremont, and they had one son, Archibald Randall, and two daughters, Nancy Valentine Enid and Sheila Mary.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment)
DavidsonJohn HumphreyLieutenantDAVIDSON, JOHN HUMPHREY, Lieutenant, was born 24 July 1876, son of George Walter Davidson, of 167, Queen's Gate, South Kensington, London.  He was educated at Harrow and Sandhurst; entered King's Royal Rifle Corps, as Second Lieutenant, 28 March 1896; became Lieutenant 15 October 1898; Captain 25 October 1901; served in the South African War, as Regimental Officer and subsequently as Divisional Signalling Officer (graded Staff Captain), 1899-1902; as Adjutant, Damant's Horse (from December 1901 to 31 May 1902); during operations in Natal, 1899, including action at Talana; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations at Colenso, also of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop, and of 5 to 7 February 1900; on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900), and action at Pieter's Hill; during operations in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast, 26 and 27 August and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September).  During operations in the Transvaal, 30 November 1901; in the operations in Orange River Colony, December 1901 to March, 1902; during operations in the Zululand Frontier of Natal, September and October 1901; during operations in Cape Colony, 1902.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal and seven clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "John Humphrey Davidson, Lieutenant, King's Royal Rifle Corps.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia, etc, were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented by the GOC, Natal.  He was Adjutant, 1st Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps, 3 September 1902 to 2 September 1905.  After passing through the Staff College, 1906-07, he was appointed GSO, 3rd Grade, HQ of Army, and GSO, 3rd Grade, War Office, 1 April, 1908 to 31 March, 1910; promoted Brigade Major, 5th Brigade, Aldershot Command, 1 April 1910 to 31 March 1912; received the Brevet of Major 10 May 1913; became Major, King's Royal Rifle Corps, 1 April 1914; appointed GSO, 2nd Grade, Staff College, 16 April 1912 to 15 May 1914, when he rejoined his regiment at Aldershot.  He served in the European War from August 1914; was GSO, 2nd Grade, 5 August 1914 to 14 July 1915; Brevet of Colonel; Temporary Brigadier General 18 February 1915; GSO, 1st Grade, 15 July 1915 to 21 December 1915; Brigadier General, GS, BEF, British Armies in France, 22 December 1915 to 13 March, 1918; Major General, GS, GHQ, British Armies in France, 14 March 1918.  He was promoted to Major General, 1 January 1918; created a CB in 1917, and a KCMG in 1917.  For his services in the European War he also received the Legion of Honour (Croix d'Officier), in 1915; promoted to Commandeur, 1916; Croix de Guerre, 1917; Belgian Croix de Couronne, Commandeur, 1916; Croix de Guerre, (Belgian), 1916; Croix de Guerre (French), second citation, 1919; American Distinguished Service Medal, 1919.  Sir John Davidson was MP for the Fareham division of Hants since 1918.  He married, in 1905, Margaret, youngest daughter of J P Grant, of Rothiemurchus, and they have one daughter, Diana.
KCMG, CB (m), DSO, QSA (7), KSA (2), 1914 Star and Bar, BWM, Victory Medal with MID,  Legion dHonneur (France) 3rd Class, Croix de Guerre (France), Order of the Crown (Belgium) 3rd Class, Croix de Guerre (Belgium, Distinguished Service Medal (USA).  Regimental Museum Winchester 1996.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Royal Rifle Corps
DavidsonPercivalCaptainDAVIDSON, PERCIVAL, Captain, was born 16 April 1874, son of Percival Davidson.  He took his MB degree; served in the South African War, 1900-1, as Medical Officer, with the Imperial Yeomanry, and was present at operations in the Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to March, 1901, and April to May 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, March to April, 1901; operations in Cape Colony, January 1901.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]: received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a, Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Percival Davidson, Captain (Medical Officer), 4th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He was given the Honorary Freedom of the City of Newcastle-on-Tyne in 1901.  He became Lieutenant, RAMC, 1 September 1902; Captain, 1 March, 1906, and Major 1 June, 1914.  He served in the European War, 1914-18, as Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, RAMC, 15 January 1917 to 14 January 1919, and was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 3 June, 1918; was Assistant Director of Medical Services, 1st Army, British Armies in France, 15 June 1917 to 23 July 1918; Assistant Director of Medical Services, GHQ, British Armies in France, 24 July 1918 to 14 January 1919; was three times mentioned in Despatches; created a CMG in 1916; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel, and awarded the Military Order of Avis.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
4th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
Page 13 of 59
<<First <Prev 11 1213 14 15 Next> Last>>