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(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
DavidsonThomas St ClairMajorDAVIDSON, THOMAS ST CLAIR, Major, was born 12 September 1861, in Edinburgh, son of Colonel Sir David Davidson, KCB, of Edinburgh, and Margaret Buchanan.  He was educated at Edinburgh Academy and Edinburgh University, and was gazetted to the Leinster Regiment 19 December 1883, serving in Lushai in 1889, as a Transport Officer (clasp); and in Chin Lushai, 1889-90, as a Transport Officer (Medal and clasp).  He became Captain 12 January 1890; was Adjutant, Leinster Regiment, 16 March 1891 to 15 March 1895; Adjutant, Volunteers, 1 November 1895 to 30 April 1901; and was promoted to Major 29 November 1899.  In South Africa Major Davidson served with the 1st Battalion Prince of Wales's Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadians), 1901-2, and took part in the operations in the Transvaal in June and July 1901; also in the operations in Orange River Colony, June 1901 to 31 May 1902.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Thomas St Clair Davidson, Major, The Leinster Regiment.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 23 May 1907, and retired 2 September 1911.  He served in the European War, from 3 August 1914, as Censor in London; and from 25 September 1914 to 19 April, 1916, as Lieutenant Colonel, 9th (Service) Battalion The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment.  Lieutenant Colonel Davidson served in France and Salonika.  He married (1st), on 2 November 1892, at Bridgend, Agnes (died 1910), daughter of T Davies, of Bryn Towy, Carmarthen, and they had four children: Dorothy Forster; Winefred Anne; Robert St Clair (born 8 April, 1900), and Ileene Hanbury.  On 16 January 1912, at Reigate, Lieutenant Colonel Davidson married .(secondly) Flora Isabella, youngest daughter of James Farquhar, of Sunnyside, Reigate, and Hall Green, Kincardineshire, and they had one daughter, Diana Jean.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Prince of Wales's Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadia
DaviesWilliam Thomas FrederickSurgeon MajorDAVIES, WILLIAM THOMAS FREDERICK, Major, was born 13 August 1860, at Swansea, South Wales, son of Dr Ebenezer Davies, of Swansea, and of Mrs E J C Davies (nee Bluett).  He was MD, BS, London, and MRCS, England.  He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, as Surgeon Major, South African Light Horse, which force he had helped to raise.  He took part in operations in Natal in 1899, including actions at Elandslaagte, Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop.  He was in Medical Charge of the Regiment during the Siege of Ladysmith, when he was present at the sortie of 7 December 1899, and action of 6 January 1900.  He was in Medical Charge of the Relief Column under Colonel Bryan Mahon, on the march to Mafeking, and was present at the Relief of Mafeking.  He was invalided owing to an injury to the knee.  He took part also in the operations in the Transvaal, east and west of Pretoria, July to November 1900.  He received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "William Thomas Frederick Davies, Surgeon Major, Imperial Light Horse.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 3 June 1901.  The receipt of the Warrant and Statutes was acknowledged by the officer's father, as Major Davies had left for South Africa.  He was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, Imperial Light Horse Volunteers; was appointed President of the Transvaal Medical Council, and Surgeon to the Johannesburg Hospital.  When the European War broke out in 1914 he raised the 2nd Imperial Light Horse, and was given command of it, serving throughout the German South-West African Campaign.  He was in the action of Gibeon, and was wounded.  He served in the Royal Army Medical Corps as Major, June 1917 to April 1919, and was appointed Surgeon Specialist to the General Military Hospital, Colchester.  He married, in 1886, Florence, daughter of T Dixon.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Light Horse
DawnayGuy PayanLieutenantDAWNAY, GUY PAYAN, Lieutenant, was born 23 March, 1878, at St James's Palace, London, son of Lieutenant Colonel the Honourable Lewis Payan Dawnay, second son of the 7th Viscount Downe and Lady Victoria Grey, sister of the 4th Earl Grey.  He was educated at Eton College, and Magdalen College, Oxford, and joined the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards at Gibraltar, July 1899.  He became Lieutenant 10 July 1900.  He served throughout the South African War of 1899-1902, taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900 including the actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May), and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to November 1900, including the actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August); operations in the Orange River Colony, November 1900; operations in the Transvaal, October 1901 to 31 May 1902; operations in Cape Colony 30 November 1900 to October 1901.  He carried out the duties of Railway Staff Officer, May to June 1901, and was afterwards on the Staff.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order, particularly for his services when ADC to General Sir Bruce Hamilton, KCB [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Guy Payan Dawnay, Lieutenant, Coldstream Guards.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  Lieutenant Dawnay was ADC to the Major General, 5th Brigade, 1st Army Corps, 9 April 1903, to 29 February 1904; ADC to the Major General, 2nd Division and 3rd Brigade, 1st Army Corps, 1 March to 1 May 1904; ADC to the Major General, 2nd Division, 1st Army Corps, 2 May to 15 June, 1904.  He was Adjutant of the Guards' Depot from 5 November 1904 to 4 November 1906', and was made, an MVO in 1906.  He was at the Staff College in 1908 and 1909; was promoted Captain 16 February 1909, and joined the Committee of Imperial Defence in 1910.  In the following year he left the Coldstream Guards with the rank of Captain, and joined the Reserve of Officers.  Captain Dawnay served in the European War from its outbreak to 30 April, 1919.  He took part with distinction in the Dardanelles Campaign, March 1915 to January 1916; the fighting in Egypt and Sinai, 1916; in Palestine, until the taking of Jerusalem, 1917; in France, 1918 to 1919.  He was mentioned in Despatches eleven times; created a CB and CMG in 1918, and was given the Brevets of Major and Lieutenant Colonel, and awarded the following foreign distinctions: the Legion of Honour (Officier); Order of St Anne (Russia); Order of St Maurice and St Lazarus (Italy), and the Distinguished Service Medal (USA).  He was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 3 May 1919, and retired with the rank of honorary Major General.  Major General Dawnay married, 12 July 1906, at Holy Trinity, Sloane Street, London, Cecil, youngest daughter of  Francis W Buxton, and the Honourable Mrs Buxton, and their children were: Pamela; Christopher Payan (born 6 July 1909), and Elizabeth Lavender.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Coldstream Guards
DawnayHughLieutenantDAWNAY, THE HONOURABLE JOHN, Captain, was born in London 23 May 1872, eldest son and heir of the 8th Viscount Downe and Viscountess Downe.  He was educated at Eton, and was gazetted to the 10th Hussars 5 December 1891; was Adjutant, 10th Hussars, 30 May 1898 to 1901; became Captain 14 June 1899.  Captain the Honourable J Dawnay served in the South African War, 1900-1, as Adjutant, 10th Hussars, to 13 May 1901; Acting Brigade Major 14 May to July 1901.  He was present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, August to 29 November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, June to August 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 17 July); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900 including actions at Colesberg (1 January to 5 February); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to July 1901; operations in Cape Colony, July to September 1901.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with seven clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "The Honourable John Dawnay, Captain, 10th Hussars.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented to him by the King 24 October 1901.  He retired from the 10th Hussars 3 August 1904, subsequently becoming Major of the King's Own Norfolk Imperial Yeomanry.  When the European War broke out, Major Dawnay went to France as ADC in 1915 to Sir John French, becoming Lord French's ADC when the latter was appointed Commander-in-Chief in England in 1916, and later Military Secretary to Lord French in Ireland, with the temporary rank of Lieutenant Colonel.  He was created a CMG in 1915, and made a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour and given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel.  He was Deputy Lieutenant and Justice of the Peace, CC, North Riding of Yorkshire, also Justice of the Peace, Northants.  He married, 24 July 1902, at Hillington, Norfolk, Dorothy, only child of Sir W ffolkes, 3rd Baronet, and they had two sons, Richard and George William ffolkes, and one daughter, Ruth Mary. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince Consort's Own) Rifle Brigade
DawnayJohnCaptainDAWNAY, THE HONOURABLE HUGH, Lieutenant, was born on the 19th September 1875, second son of Viscount Downe and Lady Cecilia Maria Charlotte Molyneux, VA (who died in 1910), daughter of the Earl of Sefton.  He received his commission in the Rifle Brigade in October 1895, and became Lieutenant in January 1898, and took part in the Nile Expedition, being present at the Battle of Khartoum, and being mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898].  He received the Medal; the 4th Glass of the Order of the Medjidie, and the Egyptian Medal with clasp.  From February 1899 to November 190O, he was Adjutant of his battalion, and in that capacity served in the South African War in 1899 and 1900, being present at operations in Natal, including actions at Lombard's Kop; the Defence of Ladysmith, including sortie of the 10th December 1899, and action of the 6th January 1900.  He was twice mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "The Honourable Hugh Dawnay, Lieutenant, The Rifle Brigade.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901.  He became Captain in the Rifle Brigade in March, 1901, and in February of the same year was appointed ADC to the Commander-in-Chief.  Major Dawnay was transferred to the 2nd Life Guards, and served in the European War.  He was killed in action on the 6th November 1914.  In 1902 he married Lady Susan Beresford, daughter of the 5th Marquess of Waterford, and they had four sons.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
10th (The Prince of Wales's Own Royal) Hussars
de CastillaJohn Stephen RamosLieutenantDE CASTILLA, JOHN STEPHEN RAMOS, Lieutenant, was born in Scotland 22 December 1866, son of Henry de Castilla.  He was educated at Aberdeen; joined the Western Australian Field Force Artillery in March, 1899; proceeded to South Africa as Lieutenant in the West Australian Mounted Infantry (2nd Contingent), and served in the South African War, 1899-1902.  He took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, including actions at Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill; operations in Cape Colony.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "John Stephen Ramos de Castilla, Lieutenant, West Australian Mounted Infantry.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were sent to Western Australia and presented there.  He was promoted to Captain in 1901.  He became Major, South African Constabulary, in December 1901.  Major de Castilla was placed on the Reserve of Officers, Union Defence Force, from October 1904.  When the European War broke out he helped to suppress the rebellion in South Africa, 1914-15.  He afterwards served in the German East African Campaign, 1916-17, as Major, Imperial Service Contingent, and was promoted Lieutenant Colonel in September 1918; he was Commandant, British Troops, Beira, Portuguese East Africa.  He was appointed Resident Magistrate, Wolmaransstad, Transvaal.  Lieutenant Colonel de Castilla married, on 10 March, 1904, at Winburg, Orange River Colony, Maude Lilian, eldest daughter of Benjamin Bremner, of Charlottetown, Canada.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
West Australia contingent
de FalbeVigant WilliamCaptainDE FALBE, VIGANT WILLIAM, Captain, was born 10 November 1867, son of Captain C V M de Falbe, Danish Royal Navy, and of Emmeline McArthur.  He was educated privately, then went through Sandhurst, and entered the Army 22 August 1888; was promoted Lieutenant 15 October 1890; was Adjutant, North Staffordshire Regiment, 22 January 1898 to 21 July 1902; became Captain 18 May 1898.  He served in the South African War, 1900-1902, as Adjutant, 2nd Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment, and was present at operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Karee Siding, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May 1900, including actions near Johannesburg; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, September and October 1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 27September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Vigant William de Falbe, Captain, North Staffordshire Regiment.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He was awarded the DSO for his good services in South Africa for nearly three years, being Adjutant of his battalion all the time.  The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902; the Warrant sent 4 November 1902.  He was promoted Major 7 April 1906.  He became Lieutenant Colonel 14 March 1913, commanding his Battalion The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire) Regiment.  Lieutenant Colonel de Falbe again saw active service in the European War, 1914-15, commanding his battalion in France from September 1914, till December 1915, when he was given the 185th Infantry Brigade, West Yorkshire Regiment.  His health failing, he returned from France in September 1917, and was given the Home Counties Reserve Brigade until demobilized in 1919, when he was given No 9 Regimental District.  He was mentioned in Despatches; created a CMG in 1915, and promoted to Brigadier General 1 January 1916.  He became full Colonel on 14 March, 1917, though at that time holding the rank of Brigadier General, which continued until 22 February, when he went to Warley, commanding No 9 Regimental District.  Brigadier General de Falbe married in 1912, Amy Rhone, youngest daughter of Edmund Hanbury, of Poles, Hertfordshire, and they had one son who was born in 1910 and died in 1917 and three daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince of Wales's) North Staffordshire Regiment
de la BereRichard NormanCaptainDE LA BERE, RICHARD NORMAN, Captain, was born in 1869, son of Major Charles R de la Bere, RMLI.  He joined the 3rd Battalion King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment and saw active service in South Africa, 1900-2; was Assistant Provost-Marshal; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, March to May 1900; operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to September 1901; operations in Cape Colony, September 1901 to January 1902.  He was mentioned in Despatches twice [London Gazette, 10 September 1901 and 29 July 1902]; awarded the Queen's Medal with two clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Richard Norman de la Bere, Captain, King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He was promoted Captain, Reserve of Officers, 6 February 1902, and became Major 14 May 1904; Retired from the Reserve of Officers.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Royal Lancaster Regiment
de RougemontCecil HenryMajorDE ROUGEMONT, CECIL HENRY, Major, was born 17 December 1865, son of Frederick de Rougemont and of Mary Rugge de Rougemont (nee Rugge-Price).  He was educated at Harrow, and the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and entered the Royal Artillery 29 April, 1885; was promoted Captain 1 April, 1895; took part in the Expeditionary Force sent out, to Dongola, when he was given command of a gunboat (Despatches [London Gazette, 13 November 1896]; 4th Class Medjidie; British Medal; Khedive's Medal with two clasps); took part in the operations on the Nile, 1897 (clasp); received the Brevet of Major 16 November 1898, and became Major 30 June, 1900; was present at Atbara (Despatches [London Gazette, 24 May and 28 September 1898]; clasp); and was wounded at Khartoum (Brevet of Major; British Medal, and clasp to Khedive's Medal).  He served in the South African War.  1899-1901; in command of 12th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry 7 May to 30 November 1901; taking part in the advance on Kimberley and the Relief of Kimberley; during operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg, actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; during the operations in the Transvaal, May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill; during operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria; during operations in the Orange River Colony, including actions at Bethlehem and Wittebergen; taking part, during the operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony, November 1900 to December 1901.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with seven clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Cecil Henry de Rougemont, Major, Royal Horse Artillery.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902; the Warrant sent 4 November 1902.  He was Brigade Major, Woolwich District, 12 February to 31 March 1903; Brigade Major, IVth Army Corps, 1 April to 30 September 1903; DAAG, Woolwich District, 1 October 1903, to 31 May 1905; DAA and QMG, Seeoml-in-Command, 1 June 1905 to 30 September 1907; General Staff Officer, 2nd Grade, East Anglian Division, Eastern Command, 30 September 1911 to 7 March, 1913.  Colonel 18 May 1916, and retired as Brigadier General, 1920.  He served in the European War, 1914-19, as General Staff Officer, 1st Grade, 19th Division, British Expeditionary Force, 7 January to 23 July 1915; became Temporary Brigadier General, Royal Artillery, 8th and 9th Army Corps, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, 2 August 1915 to 17 May 1916; was Brigadier General, 63rd (RN) Division, England: British Armies in France, 20 June 1916 to 8 January 1919: was Brigadier General, Royal Artillery, BEF, in France, 9 January to 24 June, 1919.  He was mentioned in Despatches and created a CB in 1916; CMG, 1918, and received the Legion d'Honneur.  He was a member of the Victorian Older.  Colonel de Rougemont married, in 1914, Muriel Evelyn, only daughter of Evelyn Heseltine, of The Goldings, Great Warley, Essex.  They had one son.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Horse Artillery
de SalisEdward Augustus AlfredLieutenantDE SALIS, EDWARD AUGUSTUS ALFRED, Lieutenant, was born 2 June, 1874, son of Lieutenant Colonel Edward J de Salis, Naval Ordnance Department.  He served in West Africa, 1897-98, in the Northern Territories, Gold Coast (Medal with clasp), and was gazetted to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 18 January 1899, as Second Lieutenant, from the Militia, becoming Lieutenant on 24 October of the same year.  He served in the South African War, 1899-1901; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; in the Transvaal in June, 1900; in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July 1900; in Orange River Colony, June 1900; again during the operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to March, 1901; also in Cape Colony, March to April 1901 (Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; Queen's Medal with seven clasps).  He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Edward Augustus Alfred de Salis, Lieutenant, Royal Dublin Fusiliers.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901.  He was promoted to Captain, Worcestershire Regiment, 2 August 1902; was Adjutant, King's Own Malta Regiment of Militia, 24 September 1907 to 23 September 1912.  He served in the European War, 1914-18; as Stall Captain, GHQ, BEF, 26 May 1915 to 11 November 1915; promoted to Major 13 June, 1915; was Staff Captain, GHQ, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, 20 November 1915 to 23 January 1916; as acting Lieutenant Colonel, commanding the 9th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment 59 January 1910 to 5 April 1916; as acting Lieutenant Colonel, commanding a battalion of the Machine Gun Corps 1 February 1917.  Major de Salis married, in 1902, Emily Ethel, eldest daughter of Colonel A D Geddes, 27th Regiment (Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers).
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Dublin Fusiliers
de SausmarezCecilCaptainDE SAUSMAREZ, CECIL, Captain, was born 29 September 1870, son of the Reverend Havilland De Sausmarez and Anne Preaulx Walters.  He was educated at Winchester, and at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and entered the Royal Artillery 27 July 1889, becoming Lieutenant 27 July 1892, and Captain 13 September 1899.  He served in the South African War, 1900-2, as Special Service Officer 3 January to 22 January 1900; employed with Transport 23 January 1900 to 21 August 1902.  Captain De Sausmarez was present at operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to January 1901; February to December 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, March and April, 1901; operations in Cape Colony, January to February 1901, and December 1901, to 31 May 1902.  He was twice mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Cecil De Sausmarez, Captain, Royal Garrison Artillery.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902.  From 1904 to 1909 he commanded the 22nd Derajat Mountain Battery.  Captain De Sausmarez served on the North-West Frontier of India in 1908, taking part in operations in the Zakka Khel country.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 22 May 1908], and was given the Brevet of Major 16 July 1903.  From 17 April, 1909, until 1910, he was DAAG, Abbottabad Brigade, and he became Major 21 July 1910, and from 1910 to 16 April 1913, was GSO2, 2nd (Rawalpindi) Division.  He served in the European War from February to September 1914.  He was mentioned in Despatches; given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 18 February 1915, and was severely wounded while commanding the 108th Heavy Battery at the Aisne.  He was specially employed at the War Office from 28 January 1915, as DAAG, from 23 March to 9 July 1915; as AAG, 10 July 1915 to 11 February 1917; as Deputy Director of Mobilization 12 December 1917 to 31 January 1919; as Inspector of Demobilization, War Office, 1 February 1919.  He was three times mentioned in Despatches; given the Brevet of Colonel 1 January 1919, and created a CMG in 1918.  He had been promoted Lieutenant Colonel on 17 July 1916, and Temporary Brigadier General from 12 December 1917.  He married, in 1905, Mildred, eldest daughter of the Reverend J P Morgan, and they had two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Garrison Artillery
de TraffordAugustus FrancisLieutenantDE TRAFFORD, AUGUSTUS FRANCIS, Lieutenant, served in the South African War, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette 27 September 1901]: ''Augustus Francis de Trafford, Lieutenant, 3rd South Staffordshire Regiment.  For services during the recent operations in South Africa".  He died in hospital after a lingering illness on 1 June, 1904.  When a memorial to Lieutenant de Trafford was unveiled, Colonel Raitt said of him: "Here, among those who knew him, there is no need for me to say he was a well-loved comrade.  You all know that his amiability of disposition, straightforwardness, modesty, and charm of manner would have been sure to endear him to those around him.  But we also call him a most gallant comrade, and to show you these words also are used in all sincerity.  I would like to give you two instances of his conduct in action.  In June and July 1900, he was with a wing of the battalion under my command at a place called Willow Grange, near Ficksburg, in the Orange Free State.  The enemy's position was two or three miles in front of us.  The intervening ground was a plateau running from our position up to theirs.  One day we went out to cut barbed wire from the farm fences in front that we required to strengthen our defences.  The Boers came out and shot at us, but did no harm.  Apart from the incident.  I am about to relate, it was an insignificant affair.  I left Augustus de Trafford with half a company on a little kopje to our right rear, in order to prevent the Boers working round under cover of the edge of the plateau, to enfilade us.  When we had got all the wire we needed, I rode back to the kopje where I could get a better view, in order to see when I could safely retire the covering parties.  It appears that the Boers had tried to get round our flank, and were under cover in some rocks at the edge of the plateau about 300 or 400 yards away.  I did not know they were there, and those at the kopje, no doubt thinking I knew, never told me.  I saw two soldiers lying alone a short distance in front away from their section.  I asked what they were doing, and said they were to be ordered to rejoin it.  I never meant Augustus de Trafford himself to go to them.  The next thing I saw was he walking quietly up to them.  The Boers opened fire on him, they had the exact range, and the bullets were striking the ground all round.  Horrified at the result of my order, I shouted to him to run.  He would not run, but walked quietly up to them, gave them their orders, and returned.  Every moment I expected to see him drop.  Well, I think a man might be brave enough, and yet have run without even waiting to be told to do so.  At this time he was a subaltern in the 3rd (Militia) Battalion, and there was some difficulty about getting his commission in the line.  I had an opportunity some time after of relating this incident to the General, who at once interested himself in the matter, and got his commission.  I think, therefore, we may fairly say he gained his commission by his gallantry in action.  The next incident was related to me by Major Williams, of our battalion, who was himself afterwards killed in action, and by Major Going, who is here today.  It occurred with the Mounted Infantry near Vereeniging, in the Southern Transvaal, in July 1901.  They were being closely pressed by a very superior force of Boers; de Trafford's section, which was out in front, was ordered to fall back to a ridge, where the remainder of the regiment were.  While they were doing so, he saw Major Williams' horse shot.  He at once rode up to him and begged him to take his.  Major Williams refused, and told him to go on after his section.  He would not, and before Major Williams could persuade him to do so his horse also was shot.  The Boers were right on to them, and they were surrounded and captured.  Major Williams reported this incident, and it gained him the Distinguished Service Order". 
DSO, QSA (3) CC OFS Trans (Lt S Staffs Regt), KSA (2) (Lt S Staffs Regt).  Christies 1979 £580.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South Staffordshire Regiment
DeedesCharles ParkerLieutenantDEEDES, CHARLES PARKER, Lieutenant, was born 9 August 1879, at Nether Broughton, near Melton Mowbray, son of the Reverend Philip Deedes, of Little Parmlon, Essex, and Josephine, daughter of Joseph Parker, of Brettenham Park, Suffolk.  He was educated at Winchester College, and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and joined the Yorkshire Light Infantry, as Second Lieutenant, 11 February 1899.  He became Lieutenant 9 October 1899.  He served in the South African War, as Adjutant, 20th Battalion Mounted Infantry, from December 1901 to 31 May 1902, taking part in operations in the Transvaal, April to December 1901, and April to 31 May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, January to March 1902; operations in Cape Colony, March, 1901.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Charles Parker Deedes, Lieutenant, The King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He became Captain 21 March, 1903, and served as Adjutant, 1st Battalion King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, 6 April, 1905 to 5 April, 1908.  Captain Deedes passed the Staff College, 1911, and was General Staff Officer, 3rd Grade, Scottish Command, 1 April 1912 to 4 May 1913; GSO, 3rd Grade, War Office, 5 May to 4 August 1914.  During the European War he was GSO, 3rd Grade, at GHQ, France, 5 August 1914 to 8 February 1915; GSO, 2nd Grade, GHQ, 9 February 1915 to 2 January 1916; was promoted Major 15 September 1915; was GSO2, 14th Army Corps, British Expeditionary Force, 3 January to 3 April, 1916; GSO1, 2nd Division, British Armies in France, 14 April 1916 to 6 May 1917; GSO1, War Office (temporary), 7 May 1917 to 13 January 1918; became Temporary Brigadier General and Deputy Director of Staff Duties, War Office (temporary), 1 February 1918.  He was given three Brevets: that of Major 3 June 1915; of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1917, and of Colonel 1 January 1918.  He was seven times mentioned in Despatches.  Brevet Colonel Deedes was created a CMG, 1916, and a CB, 1919; was a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour, and holds the American Distinguished Service Medal and the French Croix de Guerre.  He was an excellent cricketer; besides playing in 1898 for the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and captaining the Staff College Cricket Eleven, Camberley, in 1911, he has played for Hertfordshire, and is a Member of the MCC and the Free Foresters.  Captain Deedes married, 4 July 1906, at Brompton Oratory, London, Eve Mary, only daughter of Captain Stanley Dean-Pitt, CB, RN, and they had two children: Charles Julius, born 18 October 1913, and Mary Josephine, born 7 March, 1910.
KCB (m), CMG, DSO, QSA (5) CC OFS Trans SA 01 SA 02, KSA (2), 1914 Star, BWM, Victory Medal with MID, Defence Medal, 1935 Jubilee, 1937 Coronation, Distinguished Service Medal (USA), Order of the Crown (Belgium) 3rd Class, Legion dHonneur (France) 5th Class, Croix de Guerre (France).KOYLI Regimental Museum 1992.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Yorkshire Light Infantry
DelapGeorge GoslettLieutenantDELAP, GEORGE GOSLETT, Lieutenant, was born at Dungrow Rectory, County Donegal, 13 April, 1873, son of  Canon Alexander Delap of Valencia Island, County Kerry, and Mrs Delap.  He was educated at Rathmines School, and at the Royal College of Surgeons Dublin (LRCPI, LRCSI), and entered the Army as a Lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps 27 July 1899.  He served in South Africa from 1899 to 1902, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order for attending wounded under fire at the Battle of Magersfontein [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "George Goslett Delap Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He was mentioned in Despatches by Lord Methuen after Magersfontein and by Lord Roberts after Paardeberg, also serving in the actions at Karee Siding, Vet and Zand Rivers; operations in the Transvaal, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill, and later in the action at Reit Vie, and operations in Orange River Colony and Cape Colony.  He received the Queen's Medal with four clasps - for the Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Johannesburg and Diamond Hill - and the King's Medal with two clasps.  He became Captain 27 July 1902, and was Assistant Instructor at the RAMC School of Instruction, June 1908 to June 1912, obtaining his Majority 27 April 1914.  Major Delap commanded the New Army Training Centre, Llandrindod Wells, 9 December 1914 to 9 October 1915 and became Lieutenant Colonel 1 May 1915.  He served in the European War for three months at Salonika as DADMS and DDMS, L of C, 11 November 1915 to 8 January 1916; with Travelling War Office Board, in command, to 17 April 1916; mobilized with the 33rd General Hospital; arrive at Basra, Mesopotamia, 11 June, 1916; in command of 33rd General Hospital till 30 April 1917; appointed ADMS, Cavalry Division in Mesopotamia, 29 April, 1917 (to 7 April, 1918); Temporary Colonel 13 May 1917 to 7 April 1918; ADMS, L of C, Mesopotamia, from 27 August 1918: He had the Royal Humane Society's Bronze Medal for saving life.  He married, in 1912, Mary Dorothy, youngest daughter of Surgeon General W J Fawcett, CB, AMS, and they had a son, Peter, born 11 May 1913, and a daughter, Kathleen Mary.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
DennisonCharles GeorgeCaptainDENNISON, CHARLES GEORGE, Captain, was born 21 November 1844, at Cradock, Cape Colony, son of George Dennison, Farmer, Cape Colony, and Mary Dennison (Webber).  His father, who was a volunteer, died of wounds received in the Kaffir War of 1851, in Lower Albany, Cape Colony.  He was educated at Graham's Town, and says: "I always, from my boyhood, had a desire to be a soldier.  My forefathers have nearly all been in the Army or Navy; my grandfather served through the American War as a Colour-Sergeant in the 55th Regiment, being wounded at Bunker Hill, and also in the Peninsular War.  South African boys of my age were born and lived for years in an atmosphere of warfare and inured to danger and hardships, as also subsequently, which has made our South African lads what they are.  I have commanded Regulars and troops from New Zealand and Australia, who are all fine and brave men, but none so adaptable, so mobile, as our South Africans, who have done many daring and gallant acts in our South African War.  I allude to English and Dutch combined.  I first saw active service when I fought at the age of 19 or 20 in the Free State War of 1865, with the Basutos, when I served as a trooper in the Bloemfontein Rangers (OFS Republican Forces).  I commanded the Rustenburg Rifles, a local corps raised in Rustenburg, Transvaal Republic, in 1876, with Thomas Burgher, the President of the Transvaal, in command of his bodyguard.  I was Second-in-Command of the Border Horse, under Colonel Weatherley, under Colonel Sir E Wood in Zululand in 1879, and when they were practically wiped out and both Colonel Weatherley and his son fell at Hlobane on 28 March, was promoted to the command, with the rank of Commandant and Colonel's pay (Zululand Medal); served under Sir Garnet Wolseley in Secocolm's Country (in the Boer War of 1891), as Commandant, commanding Border Horse; raised troops on two occasions in Bechuanaland; defeated the natives during the Rebellion of Mashonwing River, Bechuanaland; captured the rebel chief Golishwe — who caused the rising — in the Kalahari Desert, and thus stopped what might have been a prolonged and costly rising to the Cape Government (Bechuanaland Medal); raised Dennison's Scouts, and served with them as OC, with the Irregular Mounted Forces in the Boer War of 1899-1902.  I cannot give particulars as to which particular act gained me the DSO.  Got the Column—known as the Kimberley Column—out of difficulties on different occasions during the Boer War".  He received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps; was mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1802]: "Charles George Dennison, Captain, South African Mounted Irregular Forces.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He rose to the rank of Major.  Major Dennison had four grandsons fighting in the European War, two of whom were severely wounded.  He was particularly fond of hunting.  Most of this has been done in Mashonaland and Matabeleland.  He often met Major F C Selous, DSO, the great hunter, and knew him well.  He married, 29 August 1867, at Aliwal North, Annie M Hoffman, descendant on her mother's side of the De Villieis family of French Huguenots, and their children were: Alexander George, who fell in the Boer War; Lillie Elizabeth; Annie Mary; Clifford, who fell in the Boer War; Harold James; Emmie, and Frederick Weatherley. 
DSO, Zulu Medal 1879 (0) (Comdt Border Horse), CGHGSM (1) Bechuanaland (Capt Stellandbosch Horse), QSA (3) CC OFS Trans (Maj DSO Dennisons Scouts), KSA (2) (Maj Western Light Horse), Kimberley Star. Spink 2002 est £3000-3500.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
SAMIF
DerryArthurLieutenantDERRY, ARTHUR, Lieutenant, was born at Plymouth, 14 October 1874, son of William Derry, of Houndiscombe.  He was educated at Wellington College, and joined the 1st Battalion Welsh Regiment 7 December 1895, having previously served in 3rd Battalion Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry.  He was promoted to Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment 22 April 1898, and served in the South African War, 1899-1902, with 6th Mounted Infantry in command of a company.  He was present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Poplar Grove, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; Transvaal, May and June, 1900; actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to September 1900, including action at Venterskroon; operations in the Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including action at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July) and Bothaville; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including actions at Colesberg (14 January to 1 February); operations in Cape Colony 30 November 1900 to February 1901; operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony, February 1901 to May 1902.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with three clasps, and for gallantry at Diamond Hill he was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Arthur Derry, Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He was invested by the King 18 December 1902.  He was promoted to Captain 9 March, 1902; was Adjutant, 1st Welsh Regiment, 11 March, 1907 to 10 March, 1910; DAA and QMG, Welsh Division, Western Command, 1 April 1912 to 4 August 1914.  He served in the European War; became Major 1 November 1914; was Temporary Lieutenant Colonel and DAA and QMG, Welsh Division, 53rd Division, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, 23 November 1915 to 23 March 1916; Brigade Major, 115th Infantry Brigade, British Armies in France, 11 July 1916 to 1 April, 1917; GSO, 2nd Grade, 14th Army Corps, British Armies in France; Mesopotamia Expeditionary Force 1 August 1917 to 24 March 1918; GSO2, 10th Army Corps, British Armies in France, 25 March to 28 August 1918; GSO2, 27th Division, British Salonika Force, 29 August to 21 November 1918; DAA and QMG, Portsmouth Garrison, 15 May 1919.  He married, in 1902, Caroline Collette, eldest daughter of the Reverend W Oxland, BA, RN, and had one daughter, Naomi Joan. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Welsh Regiment
DevineJames ArthurSurgeon MajorDEVINE, JAMES ARTHUR, Major, was born 9 November 1869, son of Captain Devine, late Deputy Surveyor-General, Ontario.  He was educated at Cardinal Manning's College, West Kensington, London, and at Trinity College, Dublin (MA, MB, BCh, BAO, MD).  He served in South Africa with the Canadian Contingents, the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles and the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 18 July 1902, and on another occasion]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "James Arthur Devine, Surgeon Major, 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He became Temporary Major, Royal Army Medical Corps, 1902.  Major Devine was on the Permanent Army Medical Staff (Canada); was Principal Medical Officer, Military Districts 10 and 11 (Manitoba, NWT, and British Columbia); Professor of Therapeutics and Clinical Medicine, Manitoba Medical College; Member of Council and Examiner in Materia Medica and Therapeutics and Clinical Medicine, University of Manitoba; Physician to Winnipeg General Hospital; Senior Physician to the Isolated Wards, St Boniface Hospital.  He served in the European War; became Temporary Major, Royal Army Medical Corps, 1915; served at various times as OC Troops' Hospital Ships, HMH Ships St George, Dover and Gloucester Castle.  Altogether Major Devine had four years' overseas service.  He married, in 1916, Mary Hilda, eldest daughter of Henry Miles.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Canada, 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles
Dick-CunynghamJames KeithLieutenantDICKSON-POYNDER, SIR JOHN POYNDER (LORD ISLINGTON), Baronet, Lieutenant, was born in 1866.  He assumed the name of Poynder on succeeding to his maternal uncle's property in 1881, and succeeded his uncle as 6th Baronet (created 1802) in 1884.  He was educated at Harrow and Christ Church, Oxford; was a Member of the London County Council for St George's, Hanover Square, from 1898 to 1904, and Conservative Member of Parliament for the Chippenham Division of Wiltshire, 1892 to 1910.  He joined the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry, and served in the South African War with the Imperial Yeomanry, taking part in operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, including actions at Zilikat's Nek, Elands River (4 to 6 August) and Venterskroon (7 to 9 August); operations in Orange River Colony, including actions at Lindley (1 to 26 June) and Rhenoster River.  For his services he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 Sept, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Sir John Poynder Dickson-Poynder, Baronet, Lieutenant, 1st Battalion Imperial Yeomanry.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901.  He retired from the Royal Scots, and subsequently from the Wiltshire Yeomanry.  In 1910 he became 1st Baron Islington, and was Governor of New Zealand from 1910 to 1912, becoming Honorary Colonel of the 9th New Zealand Mounted Rifles, March 1911; became a Privy Councillor and KCMG in 1911 and GCMG in 1913.  Lord Islington was Under Secretary of State for the Colonies from 1914 to 1915, and Parliamentary Under Secretary for India from 1915 to 1918.  He married, in 1886, Anne, daughter of R H D Dundas and Catherine Anne, daughter of the 2nd Baron Napier of Magdala, and they had one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Gordon Highlanders
DicksonJohn QuayleCaptainDICK-CUNYNGHAM, JAMES KEITH, Lieutenant, was born 28 March, 1877, third son of Sir R H A Dick-Cunyngham, 9th Baronet, and Lady Dick-Cunyngham.  He was educated at Cheltenham College, and was gazetted to the Gordon Highlanders 28 May 1898, becoming Lieutenant 4 October 1898.  He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and took part in the operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Elandslaagte and Lombard's Kop; was present at the Defence of Ladysmith, including action of 6 January 1900; during operations in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September); in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900 and again in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to December 1901.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "James Keith Dick-Cunyngham, Lieutenant, Gordon Highlanders.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 2 June 1902.  He was promoted to Captain 24 November 1902, and was Adjutant, Gordon Highlanders, 20 August 1904 to 19 August 1907.  He served in the European War from 1914; as Assistant Provost-Marshal, 2nd Army Corps, BEF, 5 August to 29 September 1914; as Brigade Major, 14th Infantry Brigade, BEF, 30 September 1914 to 3 September 1915.  He was promoted to Major 1 September 1915; was GSO2, 1st Army Corps, BEF, British Armies in France, 4 September 1915 to 5 August 1916; GS01, 51st Division, British Armies in France, 16 November 1916 to 6 April 1918; Temporary Brigadier General 1 April to 11 June 1918; commanding the 152nd Infantry Brigade, British Armies in France, 7 April to 11 June 1918; AAG, War Office (Temporary), from 15 March, 1919.  He was mentioned in Despatches, and was given the Brevets of Major 18 February 1915, and Lieutenant Colonel 3 June, 1916, and created a CMG in 1918.  Lieutenant Colonel Dick-Cunyngham married, in 1905, Alice Daisy, youngest daughter of  Sir Harold Deane, KCSI, and they had two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Field Intelligence Department
Dickson-PoynderJohn PoynderLieutenantDICKSON, JOHN QUAYLE, Captain, was born in 1800, son of Major General E J Dickson, of Castletown, Isle of Man, and  Lucy Mylrea, youngest daughter of John Quayle, of Braust, Isle of Man.  He was educated at King William's College, Isle of Man.  He served in South Africa, with the Field Intelligence Department; was mentioned in Despatches; awarded the Queen's and King's Medals, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "John Quayle Dickson, Captain, Field Intelligence Department.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  Major Dickson was a Member of the South African Native Affairs Commission, 1903-5; Adviser in Native Affairs to Orange River Colony Government, 1903-9; Resident Commissioner, Gilbert and Ellice Islands Protectorate, 1909-13; Colonial Secretary of the Falkland Islands, 1913-14; .  Sub-Commandant, Alien's Detention Camp, Knockaloe, Isle of Man, 1915.  He married, in 1888, Annie, daughter of William Hyde, of Grahamstown, and had two daughters.  His only son, Captain E J Quayle-Dickson MC, fell in action in the European War.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
1st Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
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