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(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
DillonConstantine Theobald FrancisCaptainDILLON, CONSTANTINE THEOBALD FRANCIS, Captain, was born 9 September 1873, eldest son of Lieutenant Colonel H B C Dillon, of Redhurst, Cranleigh.  He was gazetted to the Worcestershire Regiment 19July 1899, and served in the South African War, 1900-1, employed with Mounted Infantry, and was dangerously wounded.  He took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; also in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 3 December 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1901]: "Constantine Theobald Francis Dillon, Captain, Worcestershire Regiment.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He was invested by the King 24 October 1902.  He was promoted to Captain in 1902, and retired from the 4th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Worcestershire Regiment
DingwallKennethCaptainDINGWALL, KENNETH, Captain, was born at Caterham, Surrey, 17 July 1869, son of Charles Dingwall, JP, and Julie Blanche Dingwall.  He was educated mainly on the continent, and was gazetted to the 3rd Highland Light Infantry in 1888, and to the Gordon Highlanders 10 October 1891, becoming Lieutenant 21 November 1894.  He served in the operations in Chitral, 1895, with the Relief Force, and was present at the storming of the Malakand Pass (Medal with clasp).  He again saw active service in 1897-98 on the North-West Frontier of India, with the Mohmand Field Force at the base, 1897, and with the Tirah Field Force, 1898; was present at the action of Dargai, where he was severely wounded, and he received the Medal with three clasps.  He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, on the Staff.  He received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, for regimental service in the field, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Kenneth Dingwall, Captain, Gordon Highlanders.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He was invested by the King 29 October 1901.  Captain Dingwall retired (without rank) in 1904.  He became Temporary Major, 10th Seaforth Highlanders, and served in the European War, 1914-17.  He was promoted Lieutenant Colonel, Army Unemployed List.  He was Deputy Judge-Advocate on various occasions.  Lieutenant Colonel Dingwall married, 22 June 1917, in Dunfermline, Fife, Caroline Annie McJannett, daughter of Sir Thomas Fraser, MP, and Lady Fraser, and they had a son, Patrick Fraser, born 11 May 1919.
DSO, IGS 1895 (3) RofC P-F Tirah, QSA (5) CC Paard Drief Joh Belf (Capt), KSA (2), BWM, Defence Medal.  Regimental Museum Aberdeen, 2001.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Gordon Highlanders
DobellCharles MacphersonCaptainDOBELL, CHARLES MACPHERSON, Captain and Brevet Major, was born 22 June, 1869, son of Richard R Dobell, of Beauvoir Manor, Quebec.  He entered the Army 20 August 1890; served in the Hazara Expedition, 1891 (Medal with clasp); became Lieutenant 13 July 1892; was Adjutant, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, 7 July 1896 to 6 November 1900; took part in operations in Crete, 1897-98 (Brevet of Major 8 March, 1899); became Captain 22 February 1899.  He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, in command of a regiment of Mounted Infantry (22 February to 13 July 1900); Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February), actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (3 and 4 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johan-nesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in Orange River Colony, May to 15 July 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 13 July).  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Charles Macpherson Dobell, Captain and Brevet Major, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC troops in Hong Kong, and presented by him on 17 March, 1902.  He served in China in 1900 (Medal), and West Africa (Northern Nigeria) in 1906; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 18 September 1906, and 2 July 1907]; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel (29 Sept, 1907), and received the Medal and clasp.  He was promoted to Major 28 September 1907.  He was GS03, HQ of Army, 1 April 1907 to 1 February 1909; was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, Bedfordshire Regiment, 4 May 1912; was GSO2, HQ of Army, 2 February 1909 to 31 March, 1911; was Military ADC to the King 4 November 1910 to 2 June 1915; was given the Brevet of Colonel 4 November 1910; became Colonel 1 September 1913; was Temporary Brigadier General and Inspector-General, West African Frontier Force, 1 September 1913 to 22 April 1916, during which time he commanded the Allied Forces in the Cameroons, having been promoted to Major General 3 June 1915.  General Dobell commanded the Western Frontier Force, Egyptian Expeditionary Force, 9 June to 18 September 1916; was Temporary Lieutenant General 19 September 1916 to 21 April 1917, commanding No 3 Section, Canal Defences, Egyptian Expeditionary Force (19 September to 22 October 1916), and commanding Eastern Frontier Force, Egyptian Expeditionary Force, 23 October 1916 to 1 May 1917.  He was Divisional Commander, India, from 6 August 1917.  He was created a CMG in 1914, and a KCB in 1916.  He was a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Welsh Fusiliers
DobreeGeorgeLieutenantDOBREE, GEORGE, Lieutenant, was born 10 May 1873, at St Andrew's Rectory, Guernsey, son of the Reverend Henry Lissignol Dobree, BA, late Rector of St Andrew's, Guernsey, and of Amelia, daughter of the Reverend Peter Carey, MA, sometime Rector of St Saviour's, Guernsey.  He was left an orphan at the age of six, and was educated at King William's College, Isle of Man, and at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, which he entered straight from school; but owing to circumstances he resigned his cadetship and went to the Continent to study modern languages.  Returning to England in 1893, he entered Caius College, Cambridge, and obtained a third-class in the Modern Languages Tripos in 1896.  Throughout his Cambridge career, 1893-96, he was a very keen and enthusiastic member of the Cambridge University Rifle Volunteers, and when Captain of C Troop raised it to a high state of efficiency.  It was inspected by King Edward (then Prince of Wales) in May 1896.  After leaving Cambridge he studied for the Guernsey Bar at Caen University, and volunteered, while a student there, for the South African War.  He joined Paget's Horse, January 1900 as Corporal in the first section of the first company, and on arrival in South Africa was gazetted to Kitchener's Horse, as Lieutenant, 12 May 1900, and took part in the engagements at Klipriversdorp, Six Mile Spruit and Diamond Hill.  On 12 June, 1900, he was appointed ADC to Lieutenant Colonel Legge, DSO, 6th Mounted Infantry Corps, and served in the operations in the Orange Free State against De Wet.  Returning to the Transvaal, the Corps became attached to the Column under General Clements, and took part in the action at Doornkloof.  On 13 December 1900, at Nooitgedacht, the camp was surprised in the early morning by Delarey, and Colonel Legge and other officers killed and wounded.  Lieutenant Dobree assisted Colonel Legge to reinforce the piquets under heavy fire continuously (this appears in the 'Times History of the War', page 96), and helped materially in initiating and facilitating the safe retirement of the Column.  It was for gallantry in this action that he received his DSO [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "George Dobree, Lieutenant, South African Mounted Irregular Forces.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He was invested by King Edward.  After further service under General French he was recommended for leave, and returned to England in January 1901.  In addition to the DSO he received mention in Lord Kitchener's Despatch of 9 March, 1901, published in the London Gazette of 7 May 1901, and received the Queen's Medal with clasps for Wittebergen, Diamond Hill, Johannesburg and Cape Colony.  During his residence in Guernsey he became an enthusiastic officer in the Guernsey Militia Artillery, obtaining the rank of Captain.  He died in Guernsey 20 July 1907.  Captain Dobree was a keen sportsman and an accomplished musician.  He played the violin, piano and organ, but his chief forte was as a conductor.  He was conductor of the Guernsey Orchestral Society.  He was one of the founders of the Stade Franchise, RUFC, and arranged for their first visit to Cambridge in 1894.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
SAMIF
DoddsThomas HenryCaptainDODDS, THOMAS HENRY, Captain, was brn 11 December 1873, son of Thomas Dodds, of Newcastle.  He served in South Africa, as Adjutant of the 5th Contingent, Queensland Imperial Bushmen, 20 February 1901 to 5 May 1902, taking part in operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony, April 1901 to March, 1902; operations in Cape Colony, April, July and August 1901, and March 1902.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; awarded the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Thomas Henry Dodds, Captain, Queensland Contingent.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He was promoted Major 1 January 1913.  He served in the European War, as AAG and Director of Personnel (AIF), Headquarters, and became Lieutenant Colonel 1 December 1915.  He was created a CMG in 1918.  He married, in 1902, Elizabeth Jane, daughter of  George Hancock, of Brisbane.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Queensland contingent
DodgsonHeathfield ButlerCaptainDODGSON, HEATHFIELD BUTLER, Captain, was born 2 October 1863, son of  W 0 Dodgson, of Sevenoaks, and of Lucy Elizabeth Dodgson.  He was educated at Winchester and Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and entered the Army 14 February 1883.  He was promoted Captain, January 1892, and served in South Africa, 1900-2; on Staff, as Remount Officer, during operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; during operations in Orange River Colony, May to July 1900, including actions at Lindley (1 June) and Rhenoster River; taking part in the operations in the Transvaal 30 November to December 1900; in the operations in Cape Colony, January 1901, to 31 May 1902.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal and three clasps; the King's Medal and two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Heathfield Butler Dodgson, Captain, Royal Garrison Artillery.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 18 December 1902.  He was promoted Major, 1903, subsequently retiring from the Royal Garrison Artillery, 1903.  He was medically unfit for Service in 1914.  He married, in 1889, Sybil Agnes, eldest daughter of the Honourable John C W Vivian, and they had one son and daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Garrison Artillery
DonaldsonJamesCaptainDONALDSON, JAMES, Captain, was born in London, 28 February 1863.  He served in South Africa with the Imperial Light Horse from 1899 to 1902; present in operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Elandslaagte, Reitfontein and Lombard's Kop; defence of Ladysmith, including sortie of 7 December 1899, and action of 6 January 1900; Relief of Mafeking; operations in the Transvaal, east and west of Pretoria, July to November 1900; operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony, November 1900, to May 1901.  He was severely wounded; was mentioned in Despatches twice; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]; "J Donaldson, Captain, 1st Imperial Light Horse.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He joined the Reserve of Officers, Imperial Light Horse, 12 December 1902, and was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 1 July 1907.  He served in the European War, first in the South-West African campaign, and later commanding the 19th Royal Scots, British Expeditionary Force, France.  Lieutenant Colonel Donaldson married, in 1903, Miss A E Newton, of New Zealand; they had one son.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Light Horse
DoranWalter Robert ButlerMajorDORAN, WALTER ROBERT BUTLER, Major, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, was born 15 December 1861, son of General Sir John Doran, KCIE.  He joined the Royal Irish Rifles, as Lieutenant, 10 May 1882.  He served with the Egyptian Expedition, 1882; in the action at Kassassin, and Battle of Tel-el-Kebir (Medal with clasp; Bronze Star); served with the Soudan Expedition, 1884-85, on the Nile; served with native levies (clasp).  He was Staff Captain, Egypt, 12 March to 21 August 1885; Adjutant, Royal Irish Rifles, 1 February 1887 to 31 March, 1891; was promoted Captain 26 November 1888; served in the Hazara Expedition, 1888 (Medal with clasp).  He passed the Staff College in 1894, and was employed with the Egyptian Army from 1 January 1897 to 3 March, 1900; accompanied the Nile Expedition, 1897, and was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 25 January 1898], and received the Egyptian Medal with clasp; again accompanied the Nile Expedition, 1898, in charge of Store Depot and hospital at Berber; at the battles of the Atbara and Khartoum, in command of an Egyptian battalion (Despatches [London Gazette, 4 November 1898]; Brevet of Major 16 November 1898; Medal); served with the Nile Expedition 1899; took part in the operations resulting in final defeat of Khalifa, in command of the 9th Sudanese (Despatches [London Gazette, 30 January 1900]; Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 14 March, 1900).  He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, on Special Service, 4 to 22 March, 1900; Brigade Major 23 April to 22 November 1900; Staff Officer 23 November 1900 to 2 July 1902.  He was promoted Major 19 February 1901; took part in the operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to May 1901; in Cape Colony, June 1901 to 31 May 1902, in command of a Flying Column, November 1901 to 31 May 1902, and for his services he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 17 June, 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1902]: "Walter Robert Butler Doran, Major, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Irish Rifles.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He was invested by the King 18 December 1902.  From 29 June 1903 to 12 August 1904, he was employed as DAAG, 4th Army Corps.  He became Lieutenant Colonel 13 August 1904; was given his Brevet Colonelcy 29 May 1905; promoted Colonel 13 August 1908; was created a CB in 1910; GSO1, 5th Division, Irish Command, 22 July 1909 to 7 April, 1912; Temporary Brigadier General 8 April 1912 to 10 March, 1915; Brigade Commander, 17th Brigade, Irish Command, 8 April 1912 to 4 August 1914; commanded the 2nd Battalion Prince of Wales's Leinster Regiment from 1914; He served in the European War; was Brigade Commander 5 August 1914 to 10 March, 1915; Inspector of Infantry 12 April to 9 May 1915; appointed Brigade Commander 10 May 1915; Brigadier General, General Staff, Aldershot Command, 25 September 1915.  He retired as an Honorary Brigadier General 4 March, 1919.  Brigadier General Doran married, in 1911, Elsie, eldest daughter of Emile Teichmann, of Sitka, Chislehurst, and they had one son.
CB (m), DSO, Egypt (2) Tel El Kebir The Nile 1884-5 (Lt 2 RIR), IGS 1854 Hazara 1888 (Lt 2 RIR), Queens Sudan (Bimb 1 Batt EA), QSA (3) CC OFS Joh (Lt Col DSO), KSA (2) (Lt Col DSO), 1914 Star (Brig-Gen CB DSO), BWM, Victory Medal with MID, (Brig-Gen), Khedives Sudan (4) Sudan 1897 Khartoum Sudan 1899 Gedid, Khedives Star.  Glendinings 1993 £2100.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Irish Rifles
DorlingPaymaster LionelStaffDORLING, LIONEL, Major, was born 7 August 1860, son of Henry Dorling, of Epsom.  He was gazetted to the 105th Foot, as Second Lieutenant, 13 August 1879, becoming Lieutenant, South Yorkshire Regiment, 15 November 1879; was Adjutant, South Yorkshire Regiment, 20 May 1882 to 20 November 1887, and Captain, Yorkshire Light Infantry, 28 May 1884; Adjutant, Militia, 1 July 1889 to 31 March 1889; Paymaster, APD, 27 March 1893 to 2July 1901; Major 27 March 1900; Staff Paymaster, Army Pay Department, from 3 July 1901.  He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, employed as Field Paymaster, Natal Field Force; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; in the operations on Tugela Heights (Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; Queen's Medal with five clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps).  He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Lionel Dorling, Staff Paymaster, Army Pay Department.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He became Accountant, Army Account Department, 1 May 1905, and was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 3 July 1906, and Colonel 12 January 1911; was Command Paymaster, London District, 1 March 1911 to 20 April 1912; Malta, 29 April to 3 August 1912; South Africa from 29 September 1912.  Colonel Dorling served in the Great War in 1915, in the Dardanelles (Despatches), and in Egypt in 1916, and became Paymaster, Eastern Command, 17 December 1916.  He was created a CMG in 1919.  Colonel Dorling married, in 1888, Constance, youngest daughter of W H Price, of Karachi. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Army Pay Department
Dorrien-SmithArthur AlgernonLieutenantDORRIEN-SMITH, ARTHUR ALGERNON, Lieutenant, was born 28 January 1876, eldest son of Thomas Algernon Smith Dorrien-Smith, JP, DL, and Edith Anna Maria (who died in 1892), daughter of Mr and Lady Sophia Tower.  He was gazetted to the Rifle Brigade 4 May 1898; became Lieutenant, and served in South Africa, 1899-1902.  He was mentioned in Despatches, received the Queen's Medal with four clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Arthur Algernon Dorrien-Smith, Lieutenant, Rifle Brigade.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 21 October 1902.  He was extra ADC, 1904-5, to Lord Northcote, Governor-General of Australia.  He retired in 1900, and joined the Special Reserve of his Regiment.  On the outbreak of the European War he was appointed to the Staff.  Major Dorrien-Smith was twice mentioned in Despatches.  He married, in 1909, Eleanor Salvin Bowlby, third daughter of Edward Salvin Bowlby, of Gilston Park, Harlow, and they had three sons: Algernon Robert Augustus, born in 1910; Thomas Mervyn, born in 1913, and Lionel Roger, born in 1918; and two daughters: Anne Elizabeth and Innis Mary.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince Consort's Own) Rifle Brigade
Dorrien-SmithEdward PendarvesLieutenantDORRIEN-SMITH, EDWARD PENDARVES, Lieutenant, was born 26 February 1879, son of Thomas Algernon Smith Dorrien-Smith and  Edith Anna Maria, daughter of Mr and Lady Sophia Tower.  He joined the Army, from the Militia, as a Second Lieutenant in the King's Shropshire Light Infantry, 20 May 1899, and was promoted Lieutenant 10 July 1900.  He served in the South African Campaign from 1899 to 1902, as Acting ADC to the GOC, Infantry Brigade, and was present in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at, Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal, May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Lydenberg (5 to 8 September); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Elands River (4 to 16 August); operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to July 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, July to August 1901, and November 1901 to 31 May 1902; operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in September and October 1901.  For his services he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal and King's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Edward Pendarves Dorrien-Smith, Lieutenant, King's Shropshire Light Infantry.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 18 December 1902.  He became Captain 15 February 1918, and from that date until 13 February 1911, was Adjutant of the Shropshire Light Infantry.  Captain Dorrien-Smith served in the Great War as Assistant Embarkation Staff Officer, August to September 1914; Brigade Major, 36th Infantry Brigade, New Armies, September and October 1914; Staff Captain, 9th Infantry Brigade, BEF, December 1914 to March 1915; Brigade Major, 8th Infantry Brigade, BEF, March and April 1915.  He was given his Brevet Majority 3 June 1915, and promoted substantive Major 1 September 1915; was GSO2, 41st Division, New Armies, September 1915 to March 1916; GSO2, engaged in training duties in the USA April to December 1918, and was afterwards specially employed at the War Office.  He was mentioned in Despatches for services in the War.  Major E P Dorrien-Srnith married, in 1915, Frances Salvin, fourth daughter of Edward Salvin Bowlby, of Oilston Park, Harlow, and they had a son and a daughter. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's) Shropshire Light Infantry
DouglasHenry Edward ManningLieutenantDOUGLAS, HENRY EDWARD MANNING, VC, Lieutenant, served in the South African War; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 March, 1900], awarded the Victoria Cross, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Henry Edward Manning Douglas, VC, Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief, South Africa, and presented by Major General Stephenson, at Friedrichstad, 4 April, 1904.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
DouglasJames Sholto GordonCaptainDOUGLAS, JAMES SHOLTO GORDON, Captain, was born at Walmer, Kent, 2 May 1872, son of  Admiral and Mrs R Gordon Douglas, of Seafield.  He was educated at Ascham School, Bournemouth, and at the Royal Academy, Gosport, and joined the Cape Royal Riflemen in 1893.  When the South African War began, he joined 1st Brabant's Horse in 1899, and was transferred to the South African Constabulary.  He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "James Sholto Gordon Douglas, Captain, South African Constabulary.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  He was promoted to Major in 1902.  He served with the South African Constabulary, with the Transvaal Police and the South African Police.  He was appointed Deputy Commissioner in command of the South African Police, Johannesburg, from 1908, and became, during the European War, Lieutenant Colonel Commanding No 8 Military District, Union of South Africa, 1915.  Major Douglas married, in 1902, Mabel Kate, eldest daughter of Captain J O'Donnell, late 16th Lancers, and they had one son.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South African Constabulary
DouglasSholto WilliamCaptainDOUGLAS, SHOLTO WILLIAM, Captain, was born 11 October 1870, son of Major G M Douglas, 33rd Regiment.  He entered the Royal Artillery 25 July 1890; became Lieutenant 25 July 1893, and Captain 13 February 1900.  He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, and was present at operations in Natal in 1899, including actions at Elandslaagte, Rietfontein (slightly wounded and horse shot) and Lombard's Kop.  He took part also in the Defence of Ladysmith, including the action of 6 January 1900.  Captain Douglas was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Sholto William Douglas, Captain, Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented to him by the King 21 October 1901.  He passed the Staff College; was Orderly Officer, 4th Class, 31 March 1903 to 14 April 1904; Assistant Experimental Officer, Army Ordnance Department, 15 April, 1904 to 2 February 1905; Army Ordnance Department, 3 February to 21 August 1905; Staff Captain, Headquarters of Army, 22 August 1905 to 18 February 1908; was promoted to Major 6 March, 1908; retired from the Royal Artillery 16 December 1911.  He was appointed Chief Constable, Metropolitan Police, 1910, and Chief Constable, The Lothians and Peeblesshire, in 1914.  Major Douglas married, in 1901, Grace Catherine, daughter of Sir James Wolfe Murray, KCB, and Arabella (who died in 1900), daughter of W Bray.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
DouglasWilliamMajorDOUGLAS, WILLIAM, Major, was born at Cranborne Lodge, Dorset, 13 August 1858, son of William Douglas, of the East India Civil Service, and of his wife, Caroline (nee Hare).  He was educated at Bath; was gazetted to the 1st Battalion The Royal Scots 30 January 1878, and was promoted to Lieutenant 25 November 1878, serving as Adjutant, 1st Battalion The Royal Scots, 24 March, 1880 to 23 March, 1887.  He served in the Bechuanaland Expedition, 1884-85; became Captain 24 June, 1885; was Adjutant, 3rd Royal Scots (Militia), February 1888 to February 1893; and Adjutant, 1st Royal Scots, 20 February 1893 to 20 August 1894.  He was promoted to Major 24 July 1895; was at the Staff College, 1896-97.  He served in South Africa, 1900-02, and took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900.  Operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including the actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September).  He was in command of 1st Battalion Royal Scots from 24 August 1900, and in command of a column, and took part in the operations in the Transvaal, November 1900 to November 1901.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901], received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "William Douglas, Major (now Lieutenant Colonel), Royal Scots, Lothian Regiment In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented to him in South Africa.  Major Douglas had been promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 5 December 1900.  He was given the Brevet of Colonel 10 February 1904; became Colonel 1 March, 1906; was Colonel, General Staff, 6th Division, and subsequently became (when the name of the appointment was changed) GSO, 1st Grade, 8th Division (the 6th Division becoming the 8th Division), Irish Command, 1 March, 1906, to 31 October 1909.  He was created a CB in 1908; was Brigade Commander, 14th Infantry Brigade, 1 November 1909 to 9 November 1912; became Major General 10 August 1912; commanded the 42nd (East Lancashire) Division from May 1913, to 11 March, 1917.  He served in the European War from 1914; in Egypt, 10 September 1914 to 4 May 1915; the Dardanelles, 5 May 1915 to 2 January 1916 (Despatches twice [London Gazette, 21 September 1915 and November 1915]; created a KCMG November 1915); Sinai, 1916-17, including the Battle of Romani and taking of El Arish; commanded the Desert Column from 23 October 1916, to 8 December 1916 (Despatches twice, December 1916 and 6 July 1917; Croix de Guerre with Palm [London Gazette, 21 May 1917]); commanded the Western Reserve Centre in 1917 and 1918.  He married, in December 1885, Ellen Lytcott (a Lady of Grace of St John of Jerusalem), daughter of  S Taylor, Crown Solicitor, Barbados.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment)
DouglasWilliam CharlesMajorDOUGLAS, WILLIAM CHARLES, Major, was born on the 18th June 1862, son of William Douglas, of Brigton, County Angus, and Ellen, daughter of John Thomas Rigge, of Hawkshead, Lancashire.  William Charles Douglas was educated at the Royal Naval School, New Cross, and at Cheltenham College; spent some years in the United States, and joined the Royal Lanark Militia, as Second Lieutenant, on 4 June 1881, the year of the inauguration of the Territorial System, upon its adoption the 1st and 2nd Lanark Militia becoming the 3rd and 4th Battalions, The Cameronians.  He became Lieutenant, the 4th Scottish Rifles, on 1 July 1881; Captain 26 September 1885, and Major, 3rd Scottish Rifles, 25 December 1895.  As Senior Major he commanded a battalion at Aldershot, and was in charge of the detachment in London on the occasion of the Jubilee Celebration in 1897.  He served during the South African War in 1901-2, as Commandant at Boshof, Orange River Colony, and in acting command of his battalion, the 3rd Cameronians, from June 1901 to May 1902, which had fifteen months' experience of the war; and took part in the operations in Cape Colony and the Orange River Colony.  For his services in this campaign, Major Douglas was mentioned in Lord Kitchener's Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 6 December 1902; received the Queen's Medal and four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "William Charles Douglas, Major, the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles).  In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa".  The decoration was awarded for continuous good service during the war.  He commanded the 3rd Battalion Scottish Rifles from 6 December 1902 to 20 May 1908, and was granted an extension of command for two years, but did not take advantage of it, and was granted the honorary rank of Colonel 27 April 1908.  He retired 20 May 1908.  In the European War Colonel Douglas commanded the 2/5th Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) from 27 September 1914 to 15 January 1915, and commanded the 194th Infantry Brigade from 15 January 1915 to 17 March 1916.  For services in the war he was granted the honorary rank of Colonel in the Army [London Gazette, 12 April 1917]; the honorary rank of Brigadier General [London Gazette, 10 August 1917]; was invested with the Insignia of Companion of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath (Military Division) 9 February 1918, and has held the post of County Commandant Forfarshire Volunteer Regiment since 24 July 1917.  Brigadier General Douclas's favourite recreations were shooting and fishing.  He married, in August 1892, Jeannette (who died 2 December 1916), second daughter of P Hutcluson, Shipowner, of Glasgow, and they had four daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Cameronians) Scottish Rifles
DoveFrederick AllanLieutenantDOVE, FREDERICK ALLAN, Lieut,, was born 20 December 1867.  He joined the Australian Military Forces, and served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and was slightly wounded.  He was present in the advance on Kimberley, operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River.  Operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June).  Operations in Gape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900, including actions at Colesberg, February 1900.  He served as Adjutant, 3rd Battalion Australian Commonwealth Horse, 27 March 1902 to 31 May 1902; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Frederick Allan Dove, Lieutenant, New South Wales Mounted Infantry.  For services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the Lieutenant-Governor of NSW 4 December 1901.  He was promoted to Major.  Major Dove served in the European War, and died of wounds 9 December 1916. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
New South Wales contingent
DowningHenry JohnCaptainDOWNING, HENRY JOHN, Captain, was born 20 January 1862, son of Samuel Downing, LLD, Professor of Civil Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin, and of Elizabeth, only daughter of William Plummer, of Brislington, near Bristol.  He was educated at Rugby and Trinity College, Dublin, and was appointed Lieutenant in the Royal Irish Regiment, 29 July 1882.  He served with the Hazara Expedition, 1888 (Medal with clasp); was promoted Captain 20 November 1889; was Adjutant, Royal Irish Regiment 31 October 1898 to 2 July 1901.  He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as Adjutant, 1st Battalion Royal Irish Regiment, from 12 January 1900 to 2 July 1901; operations in the Orange Free State, March to May 1903; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September); operations in Orange River Colony, May to August 1900, including actions at Bethlehem (6 and 7 July) and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900, including action at Colesberg (15 January to 12 February); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to March 1902; Station Staff Officer.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Henry John Downing, Captain, Royal Irish Regiment.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 2 June 1902.  He was promoted to Major 3 July 1901, and to Lieutenant Colonel 12 March 1908.  He retired from the Army 12 March 1912.  When the European War commenced he was appointed to command the 8th Service Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 1 October 1914, and proceeded to France in command of same, February 1916; invalided; appointed to command the 10th (Training) Battalion East Lancashire Regiment, June 1916; retired January 1918; appointed to command 3rd Volunteer Battalion Devonshire Regiment October 1918; brought to notice of Secretary of State for War for valuable services rendered, February 1917; appointed OBE 3 June 1919.  He married, in 1887, Emily Harriet, daughter of Captain Arthur French Lloyd, late 52nd Oxfordshire Light Infantry, and they had two sons: Samuel Arthur Lloyd, born 5 September 1890, and Henry Geoffrey Owen, born 3 May 1896.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Irish Regiment
DoyleRichard DinesLieutenantDOYLE, RICHARD DINES, Lieutenant, served in the South African War, 1902, as Lieutenant in the New South Wales Imperial Bushmen; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902], received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Richard Dines Doyle, Lieutenant, New South Wales Bushmen.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia, etc, were sent to the Commander-in-Chief, South Africa; forwarded on by Lord Kitchener, and presented by the Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales 13 July 1901.  He was promoted to Captain. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
New South Wales contingent
DriscollDaniel PatrickCaptainDRISCOLL, DANIEL PATRICK, Captain, was born in Burma 11 May 1862, son of John Driscoll.  He received instruction at school in Burma, but at an early age turned to Service in the Mercantile Marine.  He subsequently served in the Burma Campaign, 1886-88 (Medal and clasp).  Captain Driscoll served in South Africa throughout the war, 1899-1902, first as Captain of Scouting Party, attached to the 'Colonial Division', and later as Commander of Driscoll's Scouts, and, in 1901, as Column Commander (promoted to Lieutenant Colonel).  He was mentioned in Despatches twice; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Daniel Patrick Driscoll, Captain, Driscoll's Scouts.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented there.  Driscoll's Scouts are often mentioned in the official 'History of the War in South Africa'.  In Volume II (pages 315-316) we are told that the Scouts (with three officers, 53 other ranks and 56 horses) were engaged in the defence of Wepener.  On page 122 of Volume III we read that "Sir L Bundle took the Bethlehem Road with the following force: 4th Battalion and one company of the 11th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry, the 2nd and 79th Batteries, Royal Field Artillery, Driscoll's Scouts, 2nd Grenadier Guards, 2nd Scots Guards, 2nd East Yorkshire Regiment, and, to complete the brigade, the 2nd Royal West Kent Regiment from Boye's (17th) Brigade".  On 29 May Sir L Rundle fought the action at Biddulphs Berg.  On 12 and 13 July 1900, Driscoll's Scouts were still with Sir L Rundle, and engaged in the chase after de Wet, and (after the escape of de Wet) in the attack on Slabbert's Nek.  On the 25th Sir L Rundle occupied Commando Nek; on the 26th, Fouriesburg, and on the 27th he engaged the enemy at Slaap Kranz.  In the middle of August 1901, Driscoll's Scouts formed part of the garrison at Harrismith.  Lieutenant Colonel Driscoll was appointed Chief Executive Officer, Legion of Frontiersmen.  He served in the European War from 1915, in command of the 25th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, with great distinction, and his genius of resource greatly contributed to victory achieved against heavy odds on more than one momentous occasion.  Lieutenant Colonel Driscoll was mentioned in Despatches four times by General Smuts; was awarded the Croix de Guerre (May 1917), and created a CMG in 1919.  Having been offered a grant of Government land in British East Africa, Colonel Driscoll decided to accept it, and resigning the command of the Legion of Frontiersmen, with which World-Force he had been associated for about twelve years, he sailed for East Africa early in December 1919.  Before his departure Colonel Driscoll was the recipient of many marks of esteem from the Legion as a whole, and also from separate units and individuals.  Entertained at a farewell banquet a few days before his departure, Colonel Driscoll eulogized the high spirit distinguishing the Legion of Frontiersmen as a whole, and, in particular, the wonderful pluck, power of endurance, dash and bravery of those who had served throughout the campaign in East Africa, and he called upon all present to stick to the Legion as one of the finest organizations on earth.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Driscoll's Scouts
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