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(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
EnsorHowardLieutenantENSOR, HOWARD, Lieutenant, was born 20 March, 1874, son of Edward Ensor, MA. He took his degrees, BA (1895), MB, BCh (1897) Durham University. He served with the 1st Battalion West African Frontier Force from November 1897 to March, 1899, being Senior Medical Officer in the Lahai Expedition, June 1898 (Medal and two clasps). Receiving his commission as Lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps 5 July 1899 he served in South Africa from 1899 to 1902 was present at the general actions of Magersfontein, Paardeberg, Poplar Grove and Driefontein, and operations in the Transvaal. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Howard Ensor, Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in India; presented by the GOC, Bombay, at Poona, 10 August 1902. He was promoted Captain 27 July 1901, and was employed with the Egyptian Army from 2 May 1902 to 1 May 1912; seeing active service again in the South-Eastern Soudan, 1912, in operations against the Beir and Anuak tribes (Soudan Medal with clasps). He also received in 1910 the 4th Class Osmanieh, and in 1912 the 3rd Class Medjidie; became Major 28 January 1911. He was restored to the establishment in 1912. Major Ensor served in the European War from 1914 to 1919. He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 18 February 1915; Lieutenant Colonel 1 March 1915, and on 3 June 1915, Brevet Colonel. He was ADMS, 3rd Division, British Armies in France, 11 August 1916 to 23 August 1918, then becoming Commandant, Royal Army Medical Corps, School of Instruction, British Armies in France. For his services he was made a CMG in 1918, and was six times mentioned in Despatches. Colonel Howard Ensor married, in 1912, Gladys Marian, youngest daughter of Colonel Maurice Tweedie, late Indian Army, and they had a son and a daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
EtheridgeCecil de CourcyMajorETHERIDGE, CECIL DE COURCY, Major, was born at Littlehampton 21 December 1859, son of Major General H T Etheridge, CSI, Indian Army. He was educated at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; was gazetted to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment 11 May 1878, and first saw active service in the Afghan War, 1878-79-80, when he took part in the fighting in the Kurram Valley, and also was in the Zaimukt Expedition, receiving the Medal. He served in the Nile Expedition in 1898, and was present at the Battle of Khartoum, receiving the Medal, the Egyptian Medal with clasp, and the 4th Class of the Osmanieh. He retired, as a Major, 23 December 1898, having attained to that rank 16 December 1896. Major Etheridge served in the South African War, from 1900 to 1902, as Remount Officer. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps; was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, in the Reserve of Officers, 18 October 1902, and for good work during the campaign was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Cecil de Courcy Etheridge, Major, Reserve of Officers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Lieutenant Colonel Etheridge served in the European War, 1914-1919, and was mentioned in Despatches, and created a CBE in 1919. He was Secretary to the City of Edinburgh Territorial Force Association.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Reserve of Officers
EustaceCharles Legge-EustaceCaptainEUSTACE, CHARLES LEGGE-EUSTACE, Captain, was born in 1867, son of Colonel R J E Eustace, late Lieutenant Colonel, 60th Rifles, and Lady Katharine Eustace, daughter of the 4th Earl of Dartmouth. He was educated at Eton, and joined the King's Royal Rifles in 1889. He served in the Manipur Expedition, 1891 (Medal and clasp); in the Chin-Lushai Expedition, 1891-92 (clasp); in Mashonaland, 1896 (very severely wounded; Medal). He served also in the South African War, 1899—1901, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Charles Legge-Eustace Eustace, Captain, King's Royal Rifle Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Royal Rifle Corps
EustaceHenry MontagueCaptainEUSTACE, HENRY MONTAGUE, Captain, was born at Sampford Grange, Great Sampford, Essex, 28 November 1863, son of Reverend P H Eustace, Rector of Great Sampford, and Emily Henrietta, daughter of Sir Thomas P Bridges. He was educated at Harrow; received his first commission in the Middlesex Regiment 29 August 1885, serving in the 1st and 2nd Battalions of this regiment for twenty-two years. He was promoted Captain. He served in the South African War, 1899-1903; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; during operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; taking part in the operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900) and action at Pieter's Hill; during operations in Natal, March to June, 1900; in the operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; during operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899; taking part in the operations in the Transvaal, 30 November 1900 to May 1901, and November 1901 to 31 May 1902; during operations in Orange River Colony, May to November 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 Sept, 1901], received the Queen's Medal and six clasps, King's Medal and two clasps, and for continuous and brilliant work, especially at Spion Kop, he was created a Member of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Henry Montague Eustace, Captain, Middlesex Regiment. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 28 March, 1903. He was promoted Major 16 August 1902. Major Eustace retired from the Middlesex Regiment in 1905. He was called out on the outbreak of the European War, August 1914, rejoining the Army as Major, 11th Service Battalion Middlesex Regiment, November 1914; took command of the 6th Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment April 1915. Lieutenant Colonel Eustace took part in the landing at Suvla; was very dangerously wounded at the Dardanelles 28 September 1915, and was mentioned in Despatches by Sir Ian Hamilton. He was a Justice of the Peace, County Wexford. He married, in 1903, Monica Alice Eustace, daughter of Colonel J T Eustace, of Wynberg, South Africa, and they had two sons and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Duke of Cambridge's Own) Middlesex Regiment
EvansEdwardCaptainEVANS, EDWARD, Captain, was born 28 June 1872, son of Lieutenant Colonel E W Evans and Emily Sophia, daughter of John Budding, of Lincoln. He was educated at Sandhurst, and was gazetted to the Wiltshire Regiment 19 March 1893; became Lieutenant 16 October 1895; was Adjutant, Wiltshire Regiment, 5 April 1899 to 4 October 1903, and was promoted to Captain 9 February 1900. He served in the South African War, 1900-2, and was severely wounded; was Garrison Adjutant, Pietersburg; served as Adjutant, 2nd Battalion Wiltshire Regiment to 31 May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, including actions at Colesberg (25 January to 12 February); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to January 1901 and April 1901 to 31 May 1902; operations in Cape Colony, January to April 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Edward Evans, Captain, Wiltshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. Captain Evans was Staff Captain, Home Counties Grouped Regimental District, 17 August 1905 to 31 March, 1908, and DAA and QMG, Home Counties Division, Eastern Command, April 1908 to 16 August 1909; was promoted to Major 19 March, 1910; was DAA and QMG, East Anglian Division; 54th Division, Eastern Command; Central Force, Home Defence; Mediterranean Expeditionary Force 4 January 1912 to 10 September 1915; AA and QMG, 54th Division, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force; Egyptian Expeditionary Force 11 September 1915 to 1 May 1917; became Lieutenant Colonel 2 April 1917, and Temporary Brigadier General 2 August 1917; DA and QMG, 20th Army Corps, Egyptian Expeditionary Force, 2 August 1917 to 26 January 1918; Assistant to DQMG, GHQ, Egyptian Expeditionary Force, 27 January 1918. He was appointed ADC to the King 3 June 1918; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1916, and of Colonel 3 June 1918; was created a CMG in 1918, and a CB in 1919. He married, in 1907, Helen Beatrix, daughter of Edward Huth, JP, DL, of Wykehurst Park, Haywards Heath, and of Edith, fourth daughter of Reverend F A S Marshall, Vicar of Great Easton, and they had two sons and one daughter.
anKBE (1st m), CB (m), CMG, DSO, QSA (3) CC Trans Witt, KSA (2), 1914-15 Star, BWM, Victory Medal with MID, 1935 Jubilee, 1937 Coronation, Order of the White Eagle (Serbia) 5th Class, Order of the Nile (Egypt) 3rd Class. Salisbury Military Museum 1996.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Duke of Edinburgh's) Wiltshire Regiment
EvansFisher Henry FrekeMajorEVANS, FISHER HENRY FREKE, Major, was born 21 April, 1868, only son of Captain Richard Fisher Evans, and of Mary Helen Campbell von Dadelezen. He was educated at Rossall, and St Peter's College, Cambridge (BA, 1890); joined the 4th Battalion King's Own Royal Lancashire Regiment Militia in 1893, and served in South Africa, 1900 to 1901, taking part in operations in Orange Free State, April 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, February to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony 30 November 1900 to July 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Fisher Henry Freke Evans, Major, King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa”. He was Major, Special Reserve, King's Own Koyal Lancaster Regiment, from 1902 to 1908, when he retired. He was attached to the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment 1914 to 1917. Major Evans is DL and Magistrate, County Donegal, and was High Sheriff of the County in 1911. He married, 1 June, 1892, Marie Louise Evans, eldest daughter of Major A K Haslett, RE, and they have one surviving son, Patrick Harry Freke, born 5 June, 1905, the elder son, Captain Fisher Arthur Haslett Freke Evans, The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment, having been killed in action in Mesopotamia 12 January 1917.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Royal Lancaster Regiment
EvansWilliamCaptainEVANS, WILLIAM, Captain, was born 11 February 1871, third son of V W Evans, MD, of Clifton. He was gazetted to the Royal Artillery 24 July 1891; became Lieutenant 24 July 1894, and Captain 22 February 1900. He served in the South African War, 1900-1, as Adjutant, 7th Brigade, Divisional Royal Field Artillery, 1 November 1900 to 29 April, 1901. He was present at operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Venterskroon (7 and 9 August); operations in the Orange Free State, April to May 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 17 July 1900, including the action at Lindley (1 June); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to January 1901, and February and March 1901; operations in Cape Colony, January and February 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "William Evans, Captain, Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He was promoted to Major 19 April 1909. Major Evans served in the European War from 1914 to 1918; became Lieutenant Colonel 12 May 1915; was Brigadier General, Royal Artillery, Guards Division, BEF; British Armies in France 1 March, 1916 to 27 May 1917, and Brigadier General, Royal Artillery, 18th Division, British Armies in France, 1 July 1917 to 10 November 1918. He was six times mentioned in Despatches; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 18 February 1915, and created a CMG in 1918. Lieutenant Colonel Williams married, in 1908, Dora Rosamund, daughter of James Young, of Bangalore, and they had one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
EwartFrank RowlandCaptainEWART, FRANK ROWLAND, Captain, was born 31 January 1874; joined the King's Liverpool Regiment as Second Lieutenant 7 March, 1894, and became Captain 8 July 1898. Captain Ewart served in the South African War of 1899-1902, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Frank Rowland Ewart, Captain, King's Liverpool Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He died 13 June, 1906.
DSO, QSA (5) DofL L-N Bel CC OFS (Capt Liverpool Regt), KSA (2), (Capt DSO, Liverpool Regt), Royal Humane Society Bronze Medal (Capt 29 Jan 1906). Spink 2000 est £1600-1800
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's) Liverpool Regiment
FairJames GeorgeMajorFAIR, JAMES GEORGE, Major, was born 19 November 1864, son of James Fair, of Hove. He entered the Army 29 August 1885, as Lieutenant, 21st Hussars; served as Staff Officer to General Gatacre during the Atbara Campaign in 1898; was present at the Battles of the Atbara and Khartoum; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 24 May 1898]; received the 4th Class Medjidie; the Medal and the Egyptian Medal with clasp. He was Adjutant, 21st Hussars, 1 July 1889 to 30 June 1893; was promoted to Captain, 21st Lancers, 26 October 1892; and Adjutant, Cavalry Depot, from 30 May 1899. In the South African War of 1899-1902, he served with the South African Constabulary from 14 May 1901; Despatches; Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "James George Fair, Major (21st Lancers), South African Constabulary. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". From 1904 to 1908 he commanded a Division of the South African Constabulary in the Orange River Colony, retiring from the 21st Lancers 9 December 1905. He became a Member of the Inter-Colonial Council of the Transvaal and Orange River Colony in 1906, and was Resident Commissioner and Commandant-General in Southern Rhodesia, 1908-11. Major J G Fair was Deputy Assistant Director of Remounts, 1911-15; became Lieutenant Colonel, Reserve of Officers, 25 February 1914; was Deputy Director of Remounts, Egypt, 1915-16; Deputy Assistant Director of Remounts, Southern Command. For his services in the Great War he was created a CMG in 1916. Lieutenant Colonel J G Fair married, in 1901, Mary, daughter of Lieutenant General J S Sargent, CB.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South African Constabulary
FairweatherJames MclntyreCaptainFAIRWEATHER, JAMES McINTYRE, Captain, was born at Dundee, Scotland, 13 October 1876, eldest son of Joseph Fairweather, Sculptor, of Dundee, and his wife, Jane, daughter of James Mclntyre, Wood Merchant, of Dundee. He was educated at the Harris Academy, Dundee, and by private tutors, and originally intended for the legal profession, but in 1896 went to South Africa, and joined the Staff of the East London Harbour Board. At the outbreak of the South African War he was Assistant Town Clerk at East London, and volunteered for active service with the Kaffrarian Rifles, receiving a commission in that Corps, later being promoted Captain and Adjutant. He was present in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including the defence of Wepener; operations in Orange River Colony (May to 29 November 1900), including action at Witterbergen (1 to 29 July); operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony. He was three times wounded; was mentioned in Despatches in March 1901 and March 1902. Doing especially good service at the Relief of Wepener and at Quaggasfontein, he also commanded the troops which entered the town when Aliwal North was ceded by the rebels. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "James Mclntyre Fairweather, Captain, Cape Colony Forces. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". At the conclusion of the war he was offered a commission in the Regular Army, but deciding to return to civil life, he accepted a position on the Headquarters Staff of the Central South African Railways, and at the time of his death held the post of Superintendent attached to the personal Staff of Sir William Hoy, General Manager of the South African Railways. At the time of the Union, he rendered valuable service as one of the special Committee who undertook the task of assimilating the general conditions of service for the administration of the entire staff (involving over 60,000 employees) of the Union Railways. He took a keen interest in military matters in South Africa, and after the Union became Commanding Officer of the Transvaal Motor and Cycle Corps, and later of the Rand Light Infantry. In 1913, during the July disturbances on the Rand, he was in military control of Bramfontein, and again during the strike in January 1914, he rendered valuable services. In July 1914, he was one of two South African officers who left for England on the invitation of the War Office to represent the Union Defence Department at the autumn army manoeuvres. He arrived in England a few days after the declaration of war, and sought permission to proceed to the Western Front, but was instructed to return at once to South Africa. On the suppression of the Rebellion he proceeded to German West Africa with the Rand Light Infantry. A new regiment had to be formed in German West Africa to expedite the reconstruction of the destroyed railway line from Aus westward to Keetmanshoop, thence north to Windhuk, then south through Kalkfontein to meet the new railway line which was being built from Uppington, and all railway servants with combatant units were ordered to transfer to this. It was styled the Railway Regiment, and Colonel Fairweather was given the command. He achieved splendid results under very difficult conditions, and was mentioned in Despatches in August 1918, in this connection. On returning to the Transvaal several months later than the military contingent from German West Africa, he returned for a short time to his civil duties at Railway Headquarters, but later was given the command of the South African Motor Cyclist Corps, and was killed in action on 18 February 1917, at Rupira, in the Livingstone Range, and is buried there. His brother, Major Joseph Fairweather, of the South Wales Borderers, was killed in action near Kut on 15 January of the same year. Writing of Colonel Fairweather, Mr H E M Bourne, the Secretary of the Defence Department of South Africa, said: "The death of this officer will be a very great loss, not only to the Railway Administration, but to the Union generally, and especially to the Union Defence Forces, as he was one of the oldest and keenest of Citizen Force officers, and full of soldierly qualities. The example set by Colonel Fairweather was a very high one, and I trust and hope will long be followed by the more junior officers of the Active Citizen Force". Brigadier General Sir Charles Crewe, KCMG, CB, MLA, writing of him, said: "A most gallant officer, and one for whom I have always had the greatest regard ... He again in West Africa showed the same gallantry and devotion to duty which was so noticeable in the 1900 campaign. He met his death, and we who all deplore his loss must also feel that he, like many others who have made the greatest sacrifice man can make, died as he would himself have chosen, in action serving the Empire". Colonel H B Cuming, CB, who commanded the Kaffrarian Rifles during the South African War, wrote: "He was without doubt the most gallant fellow I ever worked with in the field. His complete indifference to shell fire and bullets amazed me. He was an excellent officer in every way, and his death is an irreparable loss to the Active Union Defence Force. In every detail of his work he was thorough and full of useful ideas", while a Railway correspondent writes of him: "The men who served under him were unanimous in their praise and liking of their Commander, whose chief anxiety at all times, even at great personal sacrifice, lay in promoting the welfare and comfort of the rank and file ... Quick to commend and reward good services, he was equally spontaneous in his denunciation of the bad ... He was a man of the most honourable and lofty principles, and the country generally, still more the Railway Administration and the military service, can ill spare him".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Kaffrarian Rifles
FalknerThomas FeltonReverendFALKNER, THOMAS FELTON, The Reverend, was born 17 July 1847, son of Thomas Falkner, of Bath, and of Caroline Elizabeth, daughter of William Stratton Large, of that city. He was educated at Christ's College, Cambridge (BA, 1870; MA, 1875). He was Sub-Warden of St Thomas's College, Colombo, 1872-79; Chaplain to the Bishop of Colombo, 1873; Chaplain to the Forces, Colombo, 1874-75. He was Priest, in Charge of Woolland, Dorset, 1879-81; became Chaplain to the Forces 15 Sept, 1881; served at Aldershot, Bermuda, Guards' Depot, Chatham, Aldershot, Portsmouth, and with the South African Field Forces, 1899-1900, having been promoted to Chaplain to the Forces, Third Class, on 15 September 1891, and to Second Class on 15 September 1896. During the South African War he was present in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein. Operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901]; was promoted to Chaplain, First Class; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901], for services with Lord Methuen's Division and the Brigade of Guards: "The Reverend Thomas Felton Falkner, MA, Chaplain to the Forces, First Class. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". He was the first Church of England Chaplain to receive this distinction. The Insignia were presented to him by the King 25 July 1901. Mr Falkner became Rector of Burnham Westgate with Burnham Norton, King's Lynn, on the presentation of the Master and Fellows of Christ's College, Cambridge, in November 1903. Mr Falkner married, in 1877, Maria Louisa, eldest daughter of the Reverend James Bacon, BD, and they have two sons: Eric Felton (qv), Lieutenant Colonel, CMG, DSO, born 30 March, 1880, and Harold Arthur, born 6 February 1882; and two daughters: Mabel Irene, born 26 July 1883, and Dorothy Mary, born 7 February 1885.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Army Chaplain's Department
FaneCecilLieutenantFANE, CECIL, Lieutenant, was born at Biarritz, South of France, 10 September 1876, son of Captain F A Fane, Rifle Brigade. He was educated at Rugby, and was gazette! to the 12th (Prince of Wales's Royal) Lancers 9 June, 1897, and was promoted to Lieutenant 21 March 1902. From 1899 to 1902 he served in the South African War, taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including action at Magersfontein; at the Relief of Kimberley; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including those at Paardeberg; actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain) and Zand River; in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Diamond Hill; in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; in the Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Lindley, Bethlehem and Witterbergen; served as Adjutant, 12th Lancers, June 1901 to 31 May 1902; again served during operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to July 1901; also in Cape Colony, July 1901 to 31 May 1902 (Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; Queen's Medal with six clasps and King's Medal with two clasps). He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Cecil Fane, Lieutenant, 12th Lancers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in India, and were presented by Major General Creagh, at Umballa, at General Parade, 10 February 1903. He was Adjutant, 12th Lancers, 23 August 1902 to 31 October 1903; was employed with the West African Frontier Force 2 April to 12 November 1904; became Captain 21 May 1904, and Major 28 September 1912. He served in the European War from 1914 in France, and was twice wounded, three times mentioned in Despatches, and given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 18 February 1915. He became Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, commanding the 2/7th Territorial Force Battalion Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment (15 February to 4 October 1916), and was sent to Ireland to quell the Rebellion. The 2/7th Sherwood Foresters were the leading Battalion in the thick of the two days' fighting. Lieutenant Colonel Fane was wounded the first day, but remained on duty both days. He was Acting Lieutenant Colonel, 12th Lancers, 19 October 1916, to 3 September 1917, and was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 4 September 1917. He was created a CMG in 1916. Lieutenant Colonel C Fane married, in 1918, Gladys Mac-George, daughter of Colonel Stanley Barry.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
12th (The Prince of Wales's Royal) Lancers
FanshaweRobertMajorFANSHAWE, ROBERT, Major, was born 5 November 1863, son of the Reverend H L Fanshawe. He was educated at Marlborough, and was commissioned in the Oxfordshire Light Infantry 25 August 1883; was Adjutant, Oxfordshire Light Infantry, 1 July 1887 to 31 October 1891, serving with this regiment, principally in India, up to the outbreak of the South African War. He was promoted to Captain 15 April, 1892, and served on the North-West Frontier, 1897-98 (Indian Frontier Medal and two clasps). He was on Special Service, Natal, 4 November 1899 to 22 December 1899; was Staff Officer to the Assistant Inspector-General, Lines of Communication, South Africa, 28 December 1899 to 6 April 1900; Staff Officer, Mounted Infantry Corps, 7 April 1900 to 26 January 1902. He was wounded at Paardeberg. From 1901 to the end of the war he commanded a Mobile Column. He was present at the Relief of Kimberley. Operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February; wounded 18 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Karee Siding, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June). Operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Venterskroon (7 and 9 August). Operations in Orange River Colony (May to 29 November 1900), including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July) and Bothaville. Operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900. Operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was twice mentioned in Despatches; given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 22 August 1902; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Robert Fanshawe, Major, Oxford Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent to the Commander-in-Chief, South Africa, and presented in South Africa. He was DAAG, 4th Division, 2nd Army Corps, 11 September 1902 to 11 December 1903; became Lieutenant Colonel 18 September 1907; commanded the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry from 1907 to 1911; was given the Brevet of Colonel 5 March 1908; became Colonel 18 September 1911; was GSO, 1st Grade, 1st Division, Aldershot Command, 25 October 1911 to 4 August 1914. He served in the European War from 1914; was Temporary Brigadier General from 20 September 1914 to 29 May 1915, commanding 6th Infantry Brigade; became Major General 3 June 1915. He commanded 48th South Midland Division, British Expeditionary Force, and British Armies in France, 30 May 1915, to 24 June, 1918, and commanded the 69th Division, 1918-19. He was created a CB in 1915, and a KCB in 1917, and was eight times mentioned in Despatches. His favourite recreations were polo and pig-sticking.
KCB (m), DSO, IGS 1895 (2) PF Tirah, QSA (5) RofK Paard Joh D-H Witt, KSA (2), 1914 Star, BWM, Victory Medal with MID, 1911 Coronation, 1935 Jubilee, 1937 Coronation, Legion dHonneur (France) 5th Class, Croce di Guerra (Italy), Order of Avis (Portugal) Class unknown.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Oxfordshire Light Infantry
FargusHaroldLieutenantFARGUS, HAROLD, Lieutenant, was born 15 October 1873, at Clifton, Bristol, son of Frederick John and Amy Fargus. He, was educated at Clifton College, and was gazetted to the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry 25 March 1893; became Lieutenant 1 July 1895; was Adjutant, Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry, 4 May 1900 to 3 May 1904, and was promoted to Captain 5 July 1901. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, serving as Adjutant, 2nd Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry. He was present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtiiek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including actions at Colesberg (1 January to 3 February); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Lord Roberts's Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's South African Medal with four clasps; the King's South African Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]; "Harold Fargus, Lieutenant, The Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The insignia were presented to him by General Lyttelton, at Pretoria, 4 January 1903. He was promoted to Major 1 March 1912; was Brigade Major, Essex Infantry Brigade, Eastern Command, 11 March 1912 to 4 August 1914. He served in the European War; as Brigade Major, Essex Infantry Brigade, Central Force, Home Defence, and Brigade Major, 161st Infantry Brigade, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, 5 August 1914 to 24 April, 1916; became Lieutenant Colonel 17 April 1916; was GSO2, 11th Division, Mediterranean Force, 25 April to 17 May 1916; Brigade Commander, 125th Infantry Brigade, British Armies in France, 22 June 1917. He was mentioned in Despatches; created a CMG in 1916, and mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig's Despatch of New Year's Day, 1917, and two other occasions; created a CB in 1919, and given the Brevet of Colonel 3 June, 1918. He married, 7 October 1899, at Clifton, Bristol, Alice Gertrude Evans, daughter of J L Evans.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry
FarquharFrancis DouglasLieutenantFARQUHAR, FRANCIS DOUGLAS, Lieutenant, was born 17 September 1874, son of Sir Henry Thomas Farquhar, 4th Baronet, and the Honourable Alice Brand, daughter of the 1st Viscount Hampden. He joined the Coldstream Guards 29 April 1896, and became Lieutenant 24 January 1898. He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, on the Staff, and took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the action at Magersfontein; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to October 1900, including the action at Belfast. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Francis Douglas Farquhar, Lieutenant, Coldstream Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was ADC to Major General, Infantry Brigade, South Africa, 11 April to 5 December 1900; ADC to Lieutenant General, Infantry Division, South Africa, 10 April 1900 to 6 February 1901; was promoted to Captain, Coldstream Guards, 20 April, 1901; Chinese Royal Infantry, May 1901 to June, 1902; on Special Service with the Somaliland Field Force 7 May 1903 to 18 June 1904, on the Staff (Medal with clasp). Major Farquhar married, in 1905, Lady Evelyn Hely-Hutchinson, sister of the 6th Earl of Donoughmore, and they had two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Coldstream Guards
FarquharMoubray GoreCaptainFARQUHAR, MOUBRAY GORE, Captain, was born in 1862, son of Admiral Sir Arthur Farquhar, KCB, and Ellen (who died in 1898), daughter of S P Rickman. He served with the BSA Company's Forces in Matabeleland, 1893 (Medal) and in 1896 (clasp). He again saw active service in the South African War of 1899-1901; was mentioned in Despatches; received the Medal with seven clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Moubray Gore Farquhar, Captain, Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented at Bulawayo. He became Lieutenant Colonel of Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry we are told, in the Official 'History of the War in South Africa' (compiled by Major General Sir F Maurice, KCB, and published by Messrs Hurst and Blackett) (page 206): "In Natal itself two mounted corps, under the command of Major (local Lieutenant Colonel) A W Thorneycroft, Royal Scots Fusiliers, and Major (local Lieutenant Colonel) E C Bethune, 16th Lancers, were already being formed". Elsewhere we read that the corps was raised at Maritzburg, and on page 332 that it formed part of the mounted brigade commanded by Colonel the Earl of Dundonald. Thorneycroft and his men were engaged in the attempt to capture Hlangwhane Mountain at the Battle of Colenso. In the retreat, after Colenso, "Colonel Thorneycroft was told by Lord Dundonald to fall back slowly along the Gomba Spruit, protecting the flank of the South African Light Horse. His retreat, which was covered by the 13th Hussars and three companies of the Royal Fusiliers, was a good deal harassed by the enemy". In the Spion Kop Campaign a dismounted squadron of the South African Light Horse, supported by Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry, captured Bastion Hill. In the chapter on the capture and evacuation of Spion Kop, Sir F Maurice says that when Woodgate attacked Spion Kop on 24 January 1900, Thorneycroft offered his services as guide, and he was desired by Woodgate to take his men to the front and lead the column. Having climbed the hill and arrived at the edge of an open plateau, "Thorneycroft's men, who had been climbing in double files, halted, and having formed line, stole forward again over the crest with fixed bayonets, expectant of a volley which they had been previously ordered to receive by flinging themselves to the ground. Behind them, the Lancashire Fusiliers followed closely in column of double companies, single rank, about one hundred yards intervening between the companies. Suddenly a loud challenge, twice repeated in Dutch, rang out from the depths of the mist, followed by a burst of fire from a surprised Boer piquet, whose position was revealed by a line of dancing flashes from a dozen rifles. Flat upon the grass dropped the soldiers, and lay motionless in accordance with their orders, suffering few casualties, whilst the bullets whistled close above them for two or three minutes. Then when the magazines of the Mausers were nearly exhausted, and the fire slackened, the word was given, and the men, leaping to their feet, charged down upon the piquet, which disappeared into the protecting fog escaping with the loss of one man only. The rest of the Boer outposts upon the mountain, numbering some seventy men, vanished without offering opposition and undiscovered. Thus, at 4 am, by skill and good fortune, the summit of Spion Kop was almost bloodlessly delivered into our hands". Woodgate gave orders to entrench, which was done in the fog, and on very difficult ground, and when the mist lifted a little it was discovered that the entrenchments were wrongly placed. The Boers rallied and returned, and the fog began to disperse and disclosed Woodgate's position to the Boers. The troops, almost without cover, were almost surrounded by fire, and the Boer reinforcements arrived and began an enveloping movement. Woodgate was mortally wounded. The fight went on, watched by Buller through a telescope from Mount Alice. "Even at that distance, the energetic and courageous movements of a single officer—Thorneycroft—a man of great stature, were to be singled out from the swaying knots of figures", and General Buller suggested to Sir C Warren that Thorneycroft should be put in command. The situation had, however, become very critical. The official and other histories of the war tell the story of the lighting, and of the final evacuation of the hill. "Never since Inkerman", says Sir A Conan Doyle, in his 'Great Boer War' (page 199), "had we so grim a soldiers' battle. The company officers were superb ... Grenfell, of Thorneycroft's, was shot, and exclaimed, 'That's all right. It's not much'. A second wound made him remark, 'I can get on all right'. The third killed him". And in the end (page 202, 'Great Boer War'): "Thorneycroft saw the frightful havoc of one day, and he shrank from the thought of such another. 'Better six battalions safely down the hill than a mop up in the morning' said he, and he gave the word to retire. One who had met the troops as they staggered down has told me how far they were from being routed. In mixed array, but steadily and in order, the long thin line trudged through the darkness. Their parched lips would not articulate, but they whispered 'Water! where is water?' as they toiled upon their way. At the bottom of the hill they formed into regiments once more, and marched back to the camp. In the morning the blood-spattered hill-top, with its piles of dead and of wounded, was in the hands of Botha and his men, whose valour and perseverance deserved the victory which they had won. There is no doubt now that at 3 am of that morning Botha, knowing that the Rifles had carried Burger's position, regarded the affair as hopeless, and that no one was more astonished than he when he found, on the report of two scouts, that it was a victory and not a defeat which had come to him. How shall we sum up such an action save that it was a gallant attempt, gallantly carried out, and as gallantly met? On both sides the results of artillery fire during the war have been disappointing, but at Spion Kop beyond all question it was the Boer guns which won the action for them. So keen was the disappointment at home that there was a tendency to criticize the battle with some harshness, but it is difficult now, with the evidence at our command, to say what was left undone which could have altered the result. Had Thorneycroft known all that we know, he would have kept his grip upon the hill. On the face of it one finds it difficult to understand why so momentous a decision, upon which the whole operations depended, should have been left entirely to the judgment of one who in the morning had been a simple lieutenant colonel. 'Where are the bosses?' cried a Fusilier, and the historian can only repeat the question". Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry took a prominent part in the Relief of Ladysmith. When Northern Natal was being cleared, Thorneycroft's men were once more to the fore, on 13 May 1900, in the action at Helpmakaar, at Alleman's Nek and Laing's Nek. They took part also in the advance towards Komati Poort, and in the operations on the Johannesburg-Durban line. In the operations in the Orange River Colony they were engaged in the forcing of Springhaan Nek on 14 December 1900, and thereafter we read a great deal of the doings of Thorneycroft, now in command of a column. On 20 September 1901, Thorneycroft discovered, attacked and defeated the Boer leader, Kritzinger. Some of Thorneycroft's men were with Ternan when, in the course of his clearance of the vicinity of Bultfontein, he met with a reverse near Bultfontein 8 April, 1900. After this affair, which crippled Ternan for a time, he was ordered to Eensgevonden to refit. "This was effected", says Sir F Maurice, in Volume IV (page 489) of the Official History, "by 15 April, when, after escorting a convoy to Hoopstad, Ternan inarched to Bothaville on the 23rd. Thence he despatched Thorneycroft's MI to rejoin the officer from whom this veteran corps took its name. ThThorneycroft's Mounted Infantry
FarrarGeorge HerbertCaptainFARRAR, GEORGE HERBERT, Captain, was born at Chatteris, Cambridgeshire, 17 June 1859, son of Charles Farrar, MD, and his wife, Helen (The Crescent Lodge, Bedford), daughter of John Howard. He was educated at the Modern School, Bedford, and on leaving school entered the engineering business of his uncle, Sir Frederick Howard, going in 1879 to South Africa, to the Port Elizabeth and East London Branches. Eight years later he and his brothers settled in Johannesburg, where, in a few years, he became one of the leading men in the mining industry of the Witwatersrand. His chief enterprise was the formation of the East Rand Proprietary Mines, of which he was Chairman from the inception of the undertaking until the day of his death. He was for some time a Member of the Legislative Assembly of the Transvaal and Leader of the Opposition. He was tried for treason and sentenced to death for his share in the Jameson Raid, but the sentence was remitted on payment of a fine of £25,000. When the South African War broke out, he raised two regiments of South African Horse, and was appointed Major, Kaffrarian Rifles, 1 December 1900, and served in this campaign as Captain, and afterwards Major, Kaffrarian Rifles, and as Major on the Staff of the Colonial Division. He took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, including the Defence of Wepener; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, August to September 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July), and in Cape Colony, south of the Orange River. He was mentioned in Despatches, 16 April 1901; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "George Herbert Farrar, Captain, Kaffrarian Rifles. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia presented by the King. He was knighted in 1902. After the conclusion of peace, in 1902, he took an active part in the work of reorganization, and when Responsible Government was granted to the Transvaal he was unanimously elected leader of the Progressive Party in the House of Assembly, in opposition to the Ministry of General Botha. In 1903 Sir George Farrar was elected President of the Witwatersrand Chamber of Mines, and he took a leading part in the negotiations which led up to the formation of the Union of South Africa. For his services in this matter he was created a Baronet 2 February 1911, and he became MP for Georgetown, in the first Parliament of the Union of South Africa, 1910-11, but in December 1911, the claims of business in connection with the East Rand Company compelled him to retire from political affairs in order to devote his whole time for the reorganization of that enterprise. When the European War broke out he was on a visit to England, and was about to join General Sir Hubert Hamilton's Staff with the Army in Belgium, but he was ordered by the authorities to South Africa on the day before he was to have left. He was appointed to General McKenzie's Force, with the rank of Colonel, and was despatched to German South-West Africa as Acting Assistant Quartermaster-General. He went to Luderitz Bay in advance of the main force, and was engaged in the organization of the base camp, and later had charge of the restoration of the railway and of providing the water supply to the force, an operation of the first importance in that country. On the 19th of May 1915, he was returning from a tour of inspection when the motor trolley on which he was travelling collided with a construction train at Knibis, near Gibeon, in German South-West Africa. Sir George was fatally injured, and only lingered until the next morning. He was one of the best-known men in South Africa, and had contributed to the progress of that country by legislative work, and by attention to mining and agricultural enterprise. He married, on 3 June, 1893, at Johannesburg, Ella Mabel, daughter of Dr Charles Waylen, IMS, and had six daughters: Helen Mabel; Muriel Frances; Gwendoline; Georgina Marjorie; Kathleen Elizabeth and Ella Marguerite. Lady Farrar lived at Chicheley Hall, Newport Pagnall, Bucks, and had a residence in South Africa, Bedford Farm, near Johannesburg, Transvaal.
DSO, QSA (4) CC Wep Trans Witt (Capt DSO, Kaff Rifles). Holditch 1983 £1250.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Kaffrarian Rifles
FarrarJohn PercyCaptainFARRAR, JOHN PERCY, Captain, was born in 1857, son of Charles Farrar, MD, and brother of Sir George Farrar. He served in the South African War of 1899-1902; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "John Percy Farrar, Captain, Kaffrarian Rifles. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to South Africa, returned to England, and presented by the King. Captain Farrar married, in 1886, Mary, daughter of F Beswick, of Queenstown.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Kaffrarian Rifles
FayleRobert James LeachMajorFAYLE, ROBERT JAMES LEACH, Major, was born 1 April, 1857, son of B W Fayle, of Moor Park, Parsonstown. He joined the Army 4 February 1882; became Major, Royal Army Medical Corps, 4 February 1894 (previous service, 12 years). He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; took part in the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Robert James Leach Fayle, Major, Royal Army Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to Major Fayle through Colonel Byng. He became Lieutenant Colonel 4 February 1902, and retired 29 October 1902. Lieutenant Colonel Fayle married, in 1887, Mary, daughter of Joseph Leach, of Burwalls-Leigh Woods, near Bristol.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
FeildenCecil William MontaguCaptainFEILDEN, CECIL WILLIAM MONTAGU, Captain, was born 13 January 1863, at Quebec, son of Lieutenant General Feilden, CMG, of Witton Park, Blackburn, MP for North Lancashire. He was educated at Eton and Sandhurst, and was gazetted as Lieutenant to the Royal Scots Greys 2 August 1882; became Captain 14 February 1891; was ADC (extra) to the Lord Lieutenant, Ireland, 2 February 1891 to 17 August 1892; ADC to the Lord Lieutenant, Ireland, 3 October 1892 to 8 July 1895; ADC to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (Lord Cadogan) 30 July 1895 to 31 October 1895; also Military Secretary to Earl Cadogan. Private Secretary to Viscount Wolseley, Commander-in-Chief, 1 November 1895 to 15 January 1897; ADC (extra) to the Lieutenant General and Governor General, Ireland, 26 January 1897 to 15 November 1899. He served in the South African War, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Cecil William Montagu Feilden, Captain, 2nd Dragoons. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was a JP for Lancashire and Cheshire. Captain Feilden died 7 February 1902.
DSO, QSA (6) RofK Paard Drief Joh D-H Belf (Major DSO 2 Dragoons), KSA (2) (Major DSO 2 Dragoons). Midland 1978 £380. DNW 2000 £5000.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys)
Page 17 of 59
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