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 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
FeildenGranville CholmondeleyMajorFEILDEN, GRANVILLE CHOLMONDELEY, Major, was born 11 February 1863, eldest son of Reverend J P Feilden, Honourable Canon of Norwich Cathedral, and of the Honourable Frances Blanche Ann Calthorpe (who died 17 April 1899), second daughter of the 4th Baron Calthorpe. He entered the Seaforth Highlanders 12 November 1884, as Lieutenant, and became Captain 2 September 1891. From 16 July 1894 to 31 July 1899, he was Adjutant, Militia. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, taking part in the advance 01 Kimberley, including the action at Magersfontein. He was in command of the 2nd Battalion Seaforth Highlanders from 12 Dec 1899 to 23 January 1900; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900 including operations at Paardeberg (severely wounded); operations in the Transvaal, March to August 1901, and March to 31 May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, January to March 1902; operations in Cape Colony, February and March 1901, and August 1901 to January 1902. He received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Granville Cholmondeley Feilden, Major, Seaforth Highlanders. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted to Major 22 December 1901, and retired 15 March, 1905. He became Adjutant, Corps of Commissionaires, commanding its London Division. Major Feilden married, in 1894, Edith Margaret Catherine Colquhoun, daughter of Sir H C MacAndrew, of Aisthorpe, Inverness, and they had four daughters and had a son, Granville John Henry, born 27 August 1895. He joined the Seaforth Highlanders, and went to France in September 1914. He was killed at St Julien, Ypres, on Sunday, 25 April, 1915. Major Feilden's four daughters were: Frances Blanche Mary, Dorothy Robina Elliott, Millicent Edith, and Eugenic Cecilia Fiona.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Duke of Albany's Ross-shire Buffs) Seaforth Highl
FeildingGeoffrey Percy ThynneCaptainFEILDING, GEOFFREY PERCY THYNNE, Captain, was born 21st September 1866, eldest son of General the Honourable Sir Percy R B Feilding, KCB, and Lady Louisa Thynne, only daughter of the 3rd Marquis of Bath. He was educated at Wellington College, and entered the Army 28 April, 1888; was promoted to Lieutenant 27 November 1890, and to Captain 6 April 1898. He served throughout the South African War, 1899-1901, taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont, Modder River, Magersfontein and Paardeberg, and in the march into Bloemfontein. He afterwards acted as ADC to Major General Sir Mildmay Wilson, KCB, commanding the Western Transvaal. He was transferred to the 11th Mounted Infantry, and commanded the 14th Mounted Infantry to the end of the war. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 26 January 190O, and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal and four clasps, the King's Medal and three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 Sept, 1901]: "Geoffrey Percy Thynne Feilding, Captain, Coldstream Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902. He was promoted Major 29 November 1903; was Commandant Guards' Depot, 1 June 1908 to 31 May 1911; became Lieutenant Colonel 3 September 1912. Lieutenant Colonel Feilding saw active service in the European War; went to France in August 1914, with the original Expeditionary Force, in command of the 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards, serving with the 4th Guards' Brigade. Lord Ernest Hamilton describes the fight at Landrecies in 'The First Seven Divisions' (published by Messrs Hutchinson), pages 43-47. He tells us how the 4th (Guards) Brigade had reached Landrecies at 1 pm, very tired, and had had about four hours' rest when there came an alarm that the Germans were advancing on the town, "and the brigade got to its feet. The four battalions were split up into companies - one to each of the exits from the town. The Grenadiers were on the western side; the 2nd Coldstream on the south and east; and the 3rd Coldstream to the north and north-west. The Irish Guards saw to the barricading of the streets with transport wagons and such-like obstacles. They also loopholed the end houses of the streets facing the country. As a matter of fact, the attack did not take place till 8.30 pm, and then it was entirely borne by two companies of the 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards. At the north-west angle of the town there is a narrow street known as the Faubourg Soyere. Two hundred yards from the town this branches out into two roads, each leading into the Foret de Mormal. Here, at the junction of the roads, the Honourable A Monck's company had been stationed. The sky was very overcast, and the darkness fell early. Shortly after 8.30 pm infantry was heard advancing from the direction of the forest; they were singing French songs, and a flashlight turned upon the head of the column showed up French uniforms. It was not till they were practically at arm's-length that a second flashlight detected the German uniforms in rear of the leading sections. The machine gun had no time to speak before the man in charge was bayoneted and the gun itself captured. A hand-to-hand fight in the dark followed, in which revolvers and bayonets played the principal part, the Coldstrearn being gradually forced back by weight of numbers towards the entrance to the town. Here Captain Longueville's company was in reserve in the Faubourg Soyere itself, and through a heavy fire he rushed up his men to the support of Captain Monck. The arrival of the reserve company made things rather more level as regards numbers, though - as it afterwards transpired - the Germans were throughout in a majority of at least two to one. Colonel Feilding and Major Matheson now arrived on the spot, and took over control. Inspired by their presence and example, the two Coldstream companies now attacked their assailants with great vigour and drove them back with considerable loss into the shadows of the forest. From here the Germans trained a light field-gun on to the mouth of the Faubourg Soyere, and firing shrapnel and star shells at point-blank range, made things very unpleasant for the defenders. Flames began to shoot up from a wooden barn at the end of the street, but were quickly got under with much promptitude and courage by a private of the name of Wyatt". Lord Ernest Hamilton here describes one of the acts for which Wyatt was later awarded the Victoria Cross. "In the meantime, Colonel Feilding had sent off for a howitzer, which duly arrived, and was aimed at the flash of the German gun. By an extraordinary piece of marksmanship, or of luck, as the case may be, the third shot got it full, and the field-gun ceased from troubling. The German infantry thereupon renewed their attack, but failed to make any further headway during the night, and in the end went off in their motor-lorries, taking their wounded with them. It turned out that the attacking force, consisting of a battalion of 1,200 men, with one light field-piece, had been sent on in these lorries, in advance of the general pursuit, with the idea of seizing Landrecies and its important bridge before the British could arrive and link up with the 2nd AC. The attack qua attack failed conspicuously, inasmuch as the enemy was driven back with very heavy loss; but it is possible, that it accomplished its purpose in helping to prevent the junction of the two AC's. This, however, is in a region of speculation, which it is profitless to pursue further. The Landrecies fight lasted six hours and was a very brilliant little victory for the 3rd Coldstream; but it was expensive". Lord Hawarden and the Honourable A Windsor Clive were killed, while Captain Whitehead, Lieutenant Keppel and Lieutenant Rowley were wounded. Among the rank and file the casualties amounted to 170. Sergeant Fox and Private Thomas showed great gallantry - as did many others - and each of them was awarded the DCM. The German losses were certainly very much higher than ours. At 3.30 am on the 26th Lord Ernest tells us that "the 4th Brigade left Landrecies and continued its retirement down the beautiful valley of the Sambre". At Zonnebeke, on the 21st October, the casualties in the Guards' Brigade were considerable, especially so in the 3rd Coldstream. The Honourable C Monck and Lieutenant Waller were killed, and Colonel Feilding, Lieutenant Darrell and Lieutenant Leese wounded. For his gallantry on this occasion Lord Feilding won the DSO. From 2 September to 26 September Colonel Feilding commanded the 4th Guards' Brigade, owing to the Brigadier being wounded. During this time, the Brigade fought at the crossing of Le Petit Morin and the Battle of the Aisne. The brilliant capture of the Cour de Sempir Farm by the Guards' Brigade, when Colonel Feilding was acting Brigadier, is described by Lord Ernest Hamilton in his enthralling book. In this engagement, in the 3rd Coldstream, Captain Banbury, Lieutenant Ives, Lieutenant Bingham and Lieutenant P Wyndham were killed, and Captain Vaughan and Lieutenant Fane wounded, while the casualties among the rank and file amounted to 160. The important position then gained was never afterwards lost, but, from 14 September on, was held by the Guards' Brigade for twenty-nine consecutive days, despite a quick succession of the most determined counter-attacks by the Germans. Colonel Feilding commanded the 149th Infantry Brigade from 26 April 1915 to June, 1915; the 4th Guards' Brigade from June 1915 to 3 January 1916, and the Guards' Division from 3 January 1916 to 1918. For this distinguished record of services he was mentioned in Despatches February 1915, was given the Brevet of Colonel 18 February 1915; was mentioned in Despatches in January and June, 1916, and again in January 1917; was Temporary Brigadier General from 3 January 1916; Major General 1 January 1918; created a CB, 1916, and CMG, 1917, and a KCB in 1919. Sir Geoffrey Feilding was also a Commander of the Order of St Maurice and St Lazarus, and Commander of the Order of Coldstream Guards
FelthamJohn Alric PercyLieutenantFELTHAM, JOHN ALRIC PERCY, Lieutenant, was born at Bridport, Dorset, 12 May 1862, son of Henry John Feltham, and Louisa du Rieu, of Stellenberg, Kenilworth, Cape Town. He gained his degree BA at Cambridge University. He served in the Matabeleland Campaign in 1896 (thrice wounded; Despatches; Medal with clasp, "Mashonaland, 1897") as Captain, Rhodesian Horse Artillery. He took part in the South African War as Lieutenant, afterwards Captain, in the Protectorate Regiment, 1899-1902, being present at operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902; was thrice wounded; mentioned in Despatches; Queen's Medal with three clasps ('Siege of Mafeking', 'Transvaal' and 'Free State'), and the King's Medal. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "John Alric Percy Feltham, Lieutenant, Protectorate Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent to South Africa and presented by Colonel Crewe at Morriesburg. He was Captain, Reserve of Officers, South African Defence Force. Captain Feltham was an Attorney, Supreme Court, Transvaal. He married, in 1903, Beatrice Jane, daughter of Frederick W Good, of Alington, Wickford, Essex, and widow of A Pinsent Scott, of Adelaide.
DSO, BSA Co Medal for Rhodesia 1896, QSA (3) DofM OFS Trans, KSA (2). Johannesburg Africana Museum 1965.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Protectorate Regiment
FenwickHenry ThomasMajorFERNYHOUGH, HUGH CLIFFORD, Captain, was born 22 September 1872. He was gazetted to the Yorkshire Light Infantry 21 October 1893, becoming Lieutenant 4 December 1894, and serving on the NW Frontier of India, 1897-98, with the Tirah Expeditionary Force, when he was present at the affair at Shinkamar (Medal with two clasps). He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; became Captain 2 March, 1900: was Brigade Signalling Officer 14 May to 7 December 1900, and Signalling Officer 8 December 1901 to 13 November 1902. He took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Belmont and Enslin (wounded); operations in Orange River Colony (May to August 1900), including actions at, Lindley (26 June), Bethlehem (6 and 7 July) and Witterbergen (1 to 29 July); operations in the Transvaal, August to 29 November 1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November to December 1900, and March 1901 to 31 May 1902; operations in Cape Colony, January to March, 1901; was severely wounded. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 11 April and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Hugh Clifford Fernyhough, Captain, Yorkshire Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. Captain Fernyhough was transferred to the Army Ordnance Department in 1906; was Ordnance Officer, 4th Class, 1 February 1906 to 31 January 1913, and 1 February to 22 May 1913; was promoted to Major 23 May 1913; was Chief Ordnance Officer, Sierra Leone; was Ordnance Officer, 3rd Class, 23 May 1913. He served in the European War, 1914-18, as Ordnance Officer, 2nd Class (Temporary), 13 April, 1915; AQMG, GHQ, British Armies in France, 4 April 1917 to 22 May 1918; Ordnance Officer, 1st Class (acting), 23 May 1918; Assistant Director of Ordnance Services. He was mentioned in Despatches twice, created a CMG in 1917, and given the Brevets of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1916, and Colonel 3 June 1919. Colonel Fernyhough married, in 1903, Beatrice, daughter of H A James, of Suffolk Hall, Cheltenham.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Horse Guards
FernyhoughHugh CliffordCaptainFENWICK HENRY THOMAS, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, was born 20 December 1863, second son of Henry Fenwick and Jane Sutwidge, daughter of John Cookson, of Meldon Park, Northumberland. He joined the Royal Horse Guards 11 March 1885, as Lieutenant, becoming Captain 15 April 1891, and Major 19 September 1896. He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 7 October 1899, and became Second-in-Command, and served in the South African War, 1899-1900, taking part in the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February), actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, 1900, including action at Elands River (4 to 16 August); operations in Orange River Colony, May to November 1900, including actions at Bethlehem (6 and 7 July) and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including actions at Colesberg (5 January to 2 February). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Henry Thomas Fenwick, MVO, Major and Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Horse Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 29 October 1901. He had been created an MVO in 1901. He became Lieutenant Colonel 7 October 1903, and Colonel 27 October 1909, and commanded the Royal Horse Guards, retiring 14 October 1911. Colonel Fenwick was created a CMG in 1917. He was MP for Houghton-le-Spring, Durham, 1892-95.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Yorkshire Light Infantry
FiaschiThomas HenryMajorFIASCHI, THOMAS HENRY, Major, was born in Florence 3 May 1853, son of Professor L Fiaschi, of Florence, and Clarissa Fisher. He was educated at the Pisa and Florence Universities (MD, ChD, Pisa and Florence); went to Australia in 1875; practised in Windsor, New South Wales, and settled in Sydney in 1883; he was Honorary Consulting Surgeon, Sydney Hospital. He was attached as Medical Officer to the New South Wales Lancers; obtained leave of absence for six months, and joined the Italian Army in Abyssinia in 1896; marched with them to Kassala; was awarded the Cross of Cavaliere dei SS Maurizio e Lazzaro from King Humbert, for special merits during the Italo-Abyssinian Campaign. He took part in the South African War, 1899-1900, in command of the New South Wales No 1 Field Hospital; specially mentioned by Lord Roberts for services rendered at Paardeberg; was SMO to General Button's Brigade, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Thomas Henry Fiaschi, Major, New South Wales Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa; forwarded by Lord Kitchener, and presented by the Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales 4 December 1901. He was promoted Colonel, Army Medical Corps, 8 June, 1911; appointed PMO of the Militia (Australian Commonwealth) in conjunction with Colonel Stokes; practised as Surgeon in Sydney Hospital; appointed PMO for New South Wales. In the European War he served with the Australian Imperial Force, at Lemnos, as Officer Commanding the 3rd Australian General Hospital; was invalided to England; went to Italy, and served as Surgeon with the Italian Red Cross, 73 Ospedale de Guerra, at Schio. He has published 'Da Cheren a Cassala' (1896). Colonel Fiaschi married, in 1886, Katherine Anna, daughter of James W Reynolds.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
New South Wales contingent
FieldenHaroldCaptainFIELDEN, HAROLD, Captain, was born 4 April, 1868, son of Joshua Fielden, of Nutfield Priory, Redhill. He joined the 7th Hussars 28 June 1890, becoming Lieutenant 26 June 1893, and Captain 26 June 1899. Captain Fielden served in the South African War, 1899 to 1901, employed with the 1st Regiment Damant's Horse, and afterwards with the Prince of Wales's Light Horse. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Harold Fielden, Captain, 7th Hussars. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 29 October 1901. Captain Fielden retired 4 February 1904.
DSO, QSA (5) CC Wep Trans Witt SA 01 (Maj DSO 7/Hus), 1902 Coronation. DNW Apr 2001 £2,200.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
7th (The Queen's Own) Hussars
Finch-HattonEdward HeneageCaptainFINCH-HATTON, EDWARD HENEAGE, Captain, was born 4 January 1868, fifth son of Reverend W R Finch-Hatton, and Agnes, sister of Sir Percy Oxenden, 10th Baronet He was educated at Haileybury, and gazetted to the East Kent Regiment 17 January 1891, becoming Lieutenant, 26 April 1893, and Captain 21 October 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; was present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May and June, 1900: operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Edward Heneage Finch-Hatton, Captain, East Kent Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 18 December 1902. Captain Finch-Hatton was Adjutant, Militia, 10 October 1902 to 9 October 1907, and was promoted to Major 4 July 1908. He served in the European War, 1914-18; became Lieutenant Colonel 27 April 1915; commanded the 118th Infantry Brigade, British Armies in France, 13 July 1916 to 24 January 1917; and the Edinburgh Reserve Infantry Brigade, Home Forces, 25 January 1917 to 1 December 1918; was promoted to Colonel 27 April 1919, and created a CMG in 1916. He married, in 1912, Dagmar Gladys, daughter of Colonel Wiehn, of Littlebourne Lodge, Sandgate, and they had two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Buffs) East Kent Regiment
FirmanRobert BertramLieutenant ColonelFIRMAN, ROBERT BERTRAM, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 13 September 1859, son of H B Firman, of Brayton, Yorkshire. He was gazetted to the Middlesex Regiment, and served in the Nile Expedition of 1884-85, employed on Transport duties; and was present at the action of Kirbekan (Medal with two clasps and Khedive's Star). He served in the Burmese Expedition of 1886-87 (Medal with clasp). He became Captain 21 April 1886; retired from the Middlesex Regiment, and joined the Reserve of Officers. He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, in command of the 11th Imperial Yeomanry Battalion, and took part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900. Operations in Orange River Colony, May to 28 November 1900, including actions at Biddulplisberg, Bethlehem, Wittebergen, Witpoort and Caledon River. Operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Robert Bertram Firman, Lieutenant Colonel, Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to Lord Roberts in South Africa, and were presented by Lieutenant General Lyttelton at, Newcastle 28 April 1902. Lieutenant Colonel R B Firman married, in 1896, N Eveline, daughter of Anthony Hordern, of Sydney.
DSO, 1897 Jubilee (removed from the group in 1995), Egypt (2) The Nile 1884-5 Kirkeban (Lt & Adj 2 RW Fus), IGS 1854 Burma 1885-7 (1/RW Fus), QSA (3) CC Trans Witt (Lt Col 35th IY), KSA (2) (Lt Col 33rd Coy IY), Khedives Star. Dixon 1983 £750. Liverpool 1984 £950. Bostock 1994 £2195. DNW est £900-1200. Spinks 1999 £1700.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Yeomanry
FisetMarie Joseph EugeneLieutenant ColonelFISHER, HAROLD, Lieutenant, was born 3 March, 1877, at Fulham, London, son of the Reverend Frederic Horatio Fisher, MA, Honourable Canon of St Albans, of Church Croft, Hemel Hempstead, and Agnes Jeune, daughter of John Jackson, Bishop of London. He was educated at Haileybury, and entered the Manchester Regiment, from the Suffolk Artillery Militia, 4 May 1898, becoming Lieutenant 6 May 1899. He served in the South African 'War, 1899-1902, and took part in the operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Elandslaagte and Lombard's Kop; Defence of Ladysmith (severely wounded), including action of 6 January 1900; in Natal, March to June, 1900; in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Belfast (26 and 27 August); again in the Transvaal, 1901-2. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1902 (Sir G S White, 2 December 1899, and 23 March, 1900), and London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order 29 November 1900 [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Harold Fisher, Lieutenant, Manchester Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 12 May 1902. He was promoted to Captain 14 July 1901. He was killed in action 16 December 1914, near La Bassee.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Canada contingent
FisherHaroldLieutenantFISET, MARIE JOSEPH EUGENE, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 15 March, 1874, at Rimouski, Province of Quebec, Canada, son of Lieutenant Colonel the Honourable Senator Jean Baptiste Romuald Fiset, MD, and Aimee Flamandon, daughter of Honore Plamandon, of Quebec. He was educated at Rimouski College; Laval University (MB, 1896; MD, CM, 1898); specially qualified for treatment of ears, nose and throat, London and Paris, 1891. He entered the Volunteer Militia at the age of 16, and joined the 89th Regiment, 11 July 1890, as Provisional Second Lieutenant; served during the South African War, 1899-1900; was present at the operations in Orange Free State, including operations at Paardeberg, actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek, Zand River; operations in Orange River Colony, and Eastern and Western Transvaal; was mentioned three times in Despatches; received, the Queen's Medal and four clasps; was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902] for bravery in the field: "Marie Joseph Eugene Fiset, Lieutenant Colonel, Canadian Army Medical Staff. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was Principal Medical Officer, Coronation Contingent, London, 1902; Director, General Medical Service, Canada, 1903-6; appointed Honorary Surgeon to His Excellency the Governor General of Canada, 1905; Deputy Minister of the Department of Militia and Defence, 1906, and Vice President of the Militia Council. Surgeon General Fiset was created a CMG in 1914. He married, 22 May 1902, Stella Taschereau, daughter of Liniere Taschereau, KC, and Zoe Alleyn, and they had three daughters: Alleyn, Gabrielle and Allison.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Manchester Regiment
FitzGeraldGeorge AlfredCaptainFITZGERALD, GEORGE ALFRED, Captain, was born 31 January 1868, son of Captain M G B FitzGerald, 16th Lancers, and of Louisa Anna FitzGerald (deceased), daughter of the Reverend J S Halifax. He was educated at Clifton College. He entered the Royal Artillery 16 February 1887; became Lieutenant 16 February 1890, and Captain 9 October 1897. Captain FitzGerald served in the South African War, 1899-1901, and was present in operations in Orange Free State, February to May 1900; operatic is in Orange River Colony, May to July 1900, including the actions at Lindley (1 and 26 June), where he was wounded. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "George Alfred FitzGerald, Captain, Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901; the Warrant sent 25 January 1902. Major FitzGerald rejoined the Army on the outbreak of hostilities in Europe, as Assistant Director of Remounts, British Expeditionary Force; accompanied the British Expeditionary Force to France, 1914-18; appointed Deputy Director of Remounts 22 May 1916 (Temporary Colonel); promoted Brevet Lieutenant Colonel (Reserve of Officers), New Year's Honours List, 1 January 1917, and created a CMG. He was promoted Colonel in the Reserve of Officers on ceasing to be employed in April, 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
FitzgeraldPercy DesmondLieutenantFITZGERALD, PERCY DESMOND, Lieutenant, was born 18 April, 1873, son of the Honourable N Fitzgerald, of County Galway, Ireland, and of Moira, St Kilda, Australia, and of Marian, daughter of Sir John O'Shanassy. He was educated at Oscott Roman Catholic College; joined the Royal Kent Regiment as Second Lieutenant, from Local Military Forces, Victoria, 23 December 1893, and the 11th Hussars 24 January 1894; was made Lieutenant, 11th Hussars, 20 November 1897; served in South Africa, 1899-1900, as Intelligence Officer, graded DAAG; as Adjutant, Imperial Light Horse, from 22 October 1899, to 15 March, 1900; during operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop; took part in the Defence of Ladysmith, including sortie of 7 December 1899, and action of 6 January 1900, afterwards on the Staff; during operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September); during operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; was mentioned in Despatches (Sir G S White, 2 December 1899, and 23 March, 1900; Sir R H Buller, 9 November 1900 [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]). He received the Queen's Medal and four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Percy Desmond Fitzgerald, Lieutenant 11th Hussars. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia was sent to South Africa, forwarded to Egypt, and presented in Egypt 29 November 1901. He was appointed Adjutant, 11th Hussars, 6 May 1902 to 10 December 1903; became Captain, 11th Hussars, 12 November 1904; Major, 23 December 1908; promoted Brigade Major, 1st Cavalry Brigade, Aldershot Command, 16 April 1909 to 15 April 1913; GSO3, War Office, 1 April 1914 to 13 September 1914; GSO2, 2nd Mounted Division, Central Force, Home Defence, 14 September 1914 to 1 February 1915; GSO2, 1st Cavalry Division, British Expeditionary Force, 8 February 1915 to 3 May 1915; GSO1, 2nd Cavalry Division, British Armies in France, 4 May 1915 to 8 August 1916; Inspector of Mounted Troops, Egypt (Temporary Brigadier General) 19 August 1916 to 9 April, 1917; Brigade-Commander, 5th Mounted Brigade, Egyptian Expeditionary Force, 10 April 1917 to 3 December 1917; Brigade-Commander, 22nd Mounted Brigade, Egyptian Expeditionary Force, 4 December 1917 to 7 April 1918. He was mentioned in Despatches; made an Officer of the Legion of Honour; given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1917. He married, in 1917, Millicent, Duchess of Sutherland.
DSO, QSA (4) DofL OFS L-N Belf (Lt 11/Hus), 1914-15 Star (Maj), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Brig-Gen), 1935 Jubilee, Legion dHonneur (France) 4th Class, Order of the Star (Rumania) 3rd Class with swords. Spinks 1974 £300.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
11th (Prince Albert's Own) Hussars
FitzherbertFrancis EdwardMajorFITZHERBERT, THE RIGHT HONOURABLE FRANCIS EDWARD (LORD STAFFORD), Major and Honourable Lieutenant Colonel, was born at Swynnerton Park 28 August 1859, son of Basil Thomas Fitzherbert, DL, JP, of Swynnerton Park, Stone, Staffordshire, and Emily Charlotte, daughter of the Honourable Edward Stafford Jerningham, second son of the 8th Baron. He was educated at Beaumont College, Windsor, and joined the Lancashire Militia in 1877. He served with the Staffordshire Yeomanry from 1882 to 1898; in the South African War, 1900-2; was Commandant, Staffordshire Volunteer Regiment during the war. He was mentioned in Despatches; awarded the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "The Right Honourable Francis Edward Fitzherbert, Major and Honourable Lieutenant Colonel, 3rd Battalion Royal Lancashire Regiment, and Lieutenant Colonel Commandant, Staffordshire Volunteer Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 12 March 1902; the Warrant sent 24 January 1902. He succeeded to the peerage in 1913, and was the 12th Baron (created 1640, confirmed 1825). His brother, Basil John, born 28 October 1861, was his heir. Lord Stafford held King Edward's and King George's Coronation Medals. He was Deputy Lieutenant and Justice of the Peace for Staffordshire. He married, in London, in the Brompton Oratory, 20 April 1903, Dorothy Hilda, third daughter of Albert 0 Worthington, DL JP, of Maple Hayes, Lichfield.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Royal Lancaster Regiment
FitzwilliamWilliam Charles De Meuron WentCaptainFITZWILLIAM, EARL (WILLIAM CHARLES DE MEURON WENTWORTH-FITZWILLIAM), Captain, Born 1872, son of Viscount Milton, JP, and Laura, daughter of Lord Charles Beauclerk. He was the 7th Earl Fitzwilliam. The first Earl served five times as Queen Elizabeth's Lord Deputy in Ireland, being created Baron Fitzwilliam in 1620. He was educated at Eton and at Trinity College, Cambridge; was ADC to the Marquess of Lansdowne in India, 1892-93; Major, 4th Battalion Oxfordshire Light Infantry. He was MP (Liberal Unionist) for Wakefield, 1895 to 1902. Lord Fitzwilliam served in South Africa, 1900, being employed under the Director of Supplies, Army Headquarters (graded as a Staff Captain), and taking part in the operations in Cape Colony and Orange River Colony, 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "William Charles De Meuron, Earl Wentworth-Fitzwilliam, Captain, 4th Battalion Oxfordshire Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 25 July 1901. He succeeded his grandfather in 1902; became a Member of the County Council, Wicklow, and JP, County Wicklow and West Yorkshire, also DL, County Wicklow. Earl Fitzwilliam travelled much in India, Europe and America, and was much interested in engineering, especially mining engineering. His favourite recreations were hunting, riding, shooting, cycling and polo. He was created KCVO in 1911. He became a Major, 4th Battalion Oxfordshire Light Infantry, and Major, West Riding Royal Horse Artillery, 1908, and was promoted to Brevet Lieutenant Colonel in 1913. He served in the European War from 1914; was mentioned in Despatches, and created a CBE in 1919. In 1896 he married Lady Maud Frederica Elizabeth Dundas, daughter of the 1st Marquess of Zetland, and they had one son, Viscount Milton, born 31 December 1910, and four daughters.
KCVO, CBE (1st m), DSO, QSA (4) CC OFS Joh Belf, 1914 Star and Bar, BWM, Victory Medal with MID, 1897 Jubilee in silver, 1902 Coronation, 1911 Coronation. KRRC Museum Winchester 1996.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Oxfordshire Light Infantry
FlanaganEvelyn BranscombeSecond LieutenantFLANAGAN, EVELYN BRANSCOMBE, Second Lieutenant, was born 19 March, 1881. He served in the South African War from 1899 to 1901, for which he was mentioned in Despatches, received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Evelyn Branscombe Flanagan, Second Lieutenant, 4th Cheshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 17 December 1901. He subsequently joined the 10th Gurkhas, Indian Army.
QSA (3) CC OFS Trans (2nd Lt Cheshire Regt), 1914-15 Star (Cpl E Surrey Regt), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (2nd Lt RAF). Harpers 1997.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Cheshire Regiment
FletcherWilliam Alfred LittledaleLieutenantFLETCHER, WILLIAM ALFRED LITTLEDALE, Lieutenant, was born at Childwall 25 August 1869, son of Alfred Fletcher, JP, DL. He was educated at Eton, and Christ Church, Oxford (Eton Eight, 1890; Oxford 'Blue' for Rowing, 1890-1893); served in the South African War with the 2nd Battalion Imperial Yeomanry from 1899 to 1900. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "William Alfred Littledale Fletcher, Lieutenant, Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He again saw service in the European War from 1914 to 1918, receiving for his services the Brevet of Major, three mentions in Despatches, and the Legion of Honour. He died 14 February 1919. Major Fletcher, besides being a great oarsman, went in for big game shooting, and had travelled considerably. He was world-famous as an oarsman, coach, umpire, and a member of important rowing committees. He gained the highest honours in rowing, first appearing at Henley in the Eton College Eight of 1888, which beat Radley, but went under to Pembroke College, Cambridge, in the semi-final of the Ladies' Plate. In the following year he was at 7 in the Christ Church, Oxford Crew, which won the Leander Plate and Thames Cup, and he rowed for the College in 1890 in the same two events unsuccessfully. In the next year he was at 6 in the powerful Leander Eight, stroked by C W Kent, which won the Grand Challenge Cup and beat record against London in the final, and was also in the final for the Goblets, being partnered by F Wilkinson, and losing to Lord Ampthill and Guy Nickalls by a foot only. In 1892 he was again in the winning Leander Eight for the Grand, and won the Goblets with Vivian Nickalls. His record in the University Boat Race was the very brilliant one of four successive wins. He stroked the winning Oxford crew in 1890; was at 7 to Kent in 1891; at 6 to C M Pitman in 1892, and to M C Pilkington in 1893. In addition Colonel Fletcher has done splendid service for rowing in coaching, by umpiring at Henley, and by his work on the committee of management of Henley Regatta, and on the committee of the Amateur Rowing Association. His death caused widespread regret, and some obituary notices of him read as follows: "We regret to announce that Lieutenant Colonel William Alfred Littledale Fletcher, DSO, the Oxford Rowing Blue and coach, died of broncho-pneumonia yesterday at Allerton, Liverpool, aged 49. The name of W A L Fletcher is classical in the literature of rowing. There are many who would say that he was the finest of all heavy-weight oarsmen, and certainly among the welter-weights there are not half a dozen names that could possibly be classed with his. The eldest son of Mr and Mrs Alfred Fletcher, he was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford. His prowess as an oarsman was not so remarkable at Eton as at Oxford, but he rowed in the Eton crew of 1888 for the 'Ladies'. In January 1889, he went up to Oxford, and thenceforward developed very rapidly in weight and strength, besides improving out of knowledge as an oarsman. In the summer of 1889 he rowed '7' in the Christ Church eight, which won both the Ladies' Plate and the Thames Cup at Henley. This was followed by a remarkable success in the spring of 1890, when he stroked the Oxford crew, which beat Cambridge after four successive Cambridge victories. The tide of success in the University Boat Race had turned, and Oxford won for nine years consecutively, in the first four of which Mr Fletcher was a mainstay of the Oxford crew. He rowed stroke in 1890 (at the record weight for the thwart of 13st.), '7' in 1891, and '6' in 1892 and 1893. As a '6' he was undoubtedly at his best. It is regarded by many as the most important position in the boat, and certainly a big man at '6', who is also a superlatively good oar, can 'make' a crew to an extent that is not possible even at stroke or '7'. Mr Fletcher rowed in many very good crews and contributed greatly to their excellence. He also rowed in several college crews of fair standard that would have been of decidedly poor class without him. With Mr Fletcher at '6' it would hardly have been possible for an eight, after a reasonable period of training, to be a bad one. His record of victories is not so remarkable as that of several oarsmen of less calibre, but they were nearly all victories of the very first class. A period of comparatively few years covers his rowing career, and during that period he never entered for more than two events in any one regatta at Henley. In the races for which he entered he was almost invariably victorious. He won 'the Grand' on every occasion on which he rowed for it—namely, in the Leander crews of 1891, 1892 and 1893. In 1891 he was beaten in the final for 'the Goblets,' but in both the two following years, partnered by Mr V Nickalls, he won the event handsomely. This pair was probably the fastest that ever rowed at Henley. It may be added that the Leander eights of 1891 and 1893 were of exceptional excellence, and that the former won the final in record time. Subsequently, Mr Fletcher became famous as a coach. He trained and coached many Cambridge as well as Oxford crews with conspicuous success. His oarsmanship was remarkable for its length and power, and in hardly less degree for its smooth and finished style. Added to a long reach and vast strength, Mr Fletcher showed indomitable pluck and was possessed of great stamina. He was a man of strong and virile character, but, none the less, universally popular. Several years of his life were devoted to world-wide travel, which included an expedition into Tibet. In the South African War he won the DSO, and in stages of the present war he commanded the 2/6th (Rifles) King's Liverpool Regiment in France". "The great oarsman and coach, Lieutenant Colonel W A L Flelcher, DSO, died yesterday, a few hours after he had been elected chairman of the Henley Regatta Management Committee. He stroked the Oxford eight to victory against Cambridge in 1890, rowed '7' in the winning boat in 1891, and was '6' in the winning boats in 1892 and 1893". "The rowing record of Colonel W A L Fletcher, DSO, who died of pneumonia yesterday, is inscribed among the classics of sport. His other leading interest in life is less well known—he was an enthusiastic traveller. One of his journeys was an expedition into Tibet, in which he got within 43 miles of Lhassa. As might be expected, he made a fine soldier—his dauntless courage, his great power of physical endurance, and his determined character soon lifted him into the ranks of the first-class fighting men. He won his DSO in the South African War for a splendid resistance put up by himself and a force reduced to 16 men, who barricaded themselves in a beleaguered house at Hamelfontein, and held out for the best part of a day and all night".
DSO, QSA (2) CC OFS (Lt IY), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Lt Col), Legion dHonneur (France) 5th Class. Christies 1992 est £500-600. Dixon 1994 £1200.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Yeomanry
FlintoffThomasLieutenant ColonelFLINTOFF, THOMAS, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 16 November 1851, son of Thomas Flintoff. He was educated privately and at the New Veterinary College, Edinburgh, and entered the Royal Artillery 23 June, 1875, as Veterinary Surgeon. He was transferred to the 8th Hussars in 1878, and served with them through the Afghan War of 1879 to 1880, for which he received the Medal. He became 1st Class Veterinary Surgeon 23 June, 1885; was transferred as Veterinary Officer to the 2nd Life Guards 10 June, 1891, and became Veterinary Major 23 June 1895; Veterinary Lieutenant Colonel, 1901. He served in the Boer War of 1899-1902; received the Queen's Medal, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1902]: "Thomas Flintoff, Veterinary Lieutenant Colonel, Army Veterinary Department. For services in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were presented by the GOC, South Africa, 29 July 1903. Lieutenant Colonel T Flintoff retired from the Army in 1904. He died suddenly on 24 August 1907, at Felixstowe, at the age of 55. He married, in 1885, Kate Hannah Frost (deceased), daughter of Isaac Frost, of High Street, Norwich.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Army Veterinary Department
FoleyFrank WigramCaptainFOLEY, FRANK WIGRAM, Captain, was born 24 June 1865, fourth son of Captain Edward Foley, Royal Navy. He was educated at Tonbridge School, and entered the Royal Berkshire Regiment 8 December 1886, as Lieutenant; was promoted Captain 25 October 1897. Captain Foley served with the Mounted Infantry in the South African War, 1899-1901, taking part in operations in the Orange Free State, March to May 1900; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to October 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to October 1900 including actions at Rhenoster River and Lindley; operations in Cape Colony, November 1900 to April, 1901. He received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Frank Wigram Foley, Captain, Royal Berkshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by King Edward VII; the Warrant sent 24 January 1902. He was Instructor in Military Engineering, Royal Military College, Sandhurst from September 1901 to September 1905. He served in the European War 1914-16, being promoted Lieutenant Colonel in August 1914; raised 5th Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment in August 1914, and went in command with it to France and commanded it there till severely wounded at Givenchy 21 December 1915. He was awarded the CBE, May 1919; promoted full Colonel 10 May 1919. Captain Foley married, in 1903, Baroness Berkeley, and they had two daughters, the Honourable Mary Lalle and the Honourable Cynthia Ella.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Princess Charlotte of Wales's) Royal Berkshire Re
ForbesDavidCaptainFORBES, DAVID, Captain, was born 13 December 1864, son of David Forbes, of Athole, District of Ermelo, Transvaal (late of Perthshire, Scotland), and of Mrs Forbes. He was educated privately, and started stock farming in the Transvaal and Mining in Swaziland; was a Member of the first Swaziland Government, formed under a Charter granted by the Swazi King, Umbandini, and at one time was Acting Chairman to that body. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; was on General Sir John Dartnell's Staff for Intelligence; on General Bullock's Staff on the Mobile Column, Transvaal and Orange River Colony; General Spens' Staff, Transvaal and Orange River Colony; commanded the Lubounto Intelligence Scouts in the Southern Transvaal (Despatches by Lord Roberts, Lord Kitchener and General Sir John Dartnell); awarded South African Medals and clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "David Forbes, Captain, Field Intelligence Department. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the Colonial Office, and presented at Ermelo 15 May 1903. Captain Forbes later became General Manager and Director of the Swazi Coal Mines, Limited, Swaziland.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Field Intelligence Department
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