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 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
HuntingtonArthurCaptainHUNTINGTON, ARTHUR, Captain, was born 21 February 1871. He served in the South African War, 1900-1; was mentioned in Despatches twice; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Arthur Huntington, Captain, 8th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He became Major, Duke of Lancaster's Imperial Yeomanry, and resigned his commission. He was Honorary Captain in the Army. Major Huntington married, in 1906, Gladys Blanche, daughter of C W Hazlehurst, of Moreton Court, Herefordshire.
DSO, QSA (3) CC OFS SA 01 (Capt 8th IY), BWM, Victory Medal, Territorial FWM (Maj D of LOY). Spink 1975 £170.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
8th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
HutchensHarold JohnSurgeon CaptainHUTCHENS, HAROLD JOHN, Surgeon Captain, served in the South African War, with the Queensland Contingent, 1901-2; in operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony, April 1901 to May 1902; operations in Cape Colony, April, July and August 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; awarded the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Harold John Hutchens, Surgeon Captain, Queensland Contingent. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Professor of Comparative Pathology at Durham University. He was a Master of Arts, a Member of the Royal College of Surgeons, a Licentiate of the Royal College of Physicians, and held the Oxford Diploma of Public Health. Captain Hutchens married, in 1906, Ada Muriel, daughter of Charles Clay, MRCS, of The Manor House, Dewsbury, and had one son.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Queensland contingent
HutchinsonHugh MooreLieutenantHUTCHINSON, HUGH MOORE, Lieutenant, was born 7 June, 1874, son of Reverend S Hutchinson, MA. He was educated at Cheltenham and Sandhurst; entered the Connaught Rangers as a Second Lieutenant 10 October 1894. He was promoted Lieutenant 19 October 1898, and was employed from October 1898, for thirteen months with the West African Regiment, serving in the Protectorate Expedition in Sierra Leone, for which he had the Medal and clasp. He next saw active service in South Africa, 1899 to 1901, taking part in the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 24 February, in which he was dangerously wounded (with wounds in five places, 23 February); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, August to 29 November 1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November to December 1900; operations in the Orange River Colony, December 1900 to June, 1901; operations in Cape Colony, December 1900 to February 1901, and June to July 1901 (severely wounded in three places, 14 July). For his services in the South African War Lieutenant Hutchinson was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 Sep. 1901] was awarded the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Hugh Moore Hutchinson, Lieutenant, Connaught Rangers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. Becoming Captain 12 April, 1902, he was employed until 10 April, 1912, with the Egyptian Army, and besides commanding the 1st Egyptian Battalion on Cholera Duty (4th Class Medjidih), took part in three campaigns in the Soudan, viz: Operations against the Nyam Nyam Tribes, in the Bahr-el-Ghazal Province, 1905 (Egyptian Medal with clasp); operations in Southern Kordofan at Talodi, 1906 (clasp to Egyptian Medal), and in Southern Kordofan, 1910 (Soudan Medal with clasp; 3rd Class Osmanieh). During this period he commanded the 12th Soudanese, 1900-12. He, was promoted Major 3 June, 1914, and was Officer and Commander of a Company of Gentleman Cadets at Sandhurst from December 1914 to April, 1915, and subsequently served in the European War as Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, and was created a CMG in 1918. He became Temporary Lieutenant Colonel in command of the 3rd Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers 21 February 1919. Major Hutchinson married, in 1914, Eileen Millicent, youngest daughter of Minton Goode, and they had one son.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Connaught Rangers
HuthPercival CuthbertSecond LieutenantHUTH, PERCIVAL CUTHBERT, Second Lieutenant, was born 22 February 1879, son of Percival Huth, of Freshford Manor, near Bath, and Marion, daughter of the Reverend Dodd. He was educated at Malvern College, and at Oxford Military College, Cowley. He entered the Militia 3 May 1900 and saw active service in the Ashanti Campaign of 1900, receiving the Medal. He served in the South African War, 1901-2, employed with Mounted Infantry (severely wounded); took part in the operations in the Transvaal, July 1901; in Orange River Colony, May to June 1901; July 1901 to January 1902, and February 1902; also in Cape Colony, January 1902 (Despatches [London Gazette, 25 April 1902]; Queen's Medal with five clasps). He was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Shropshire Light Infantry 23 April, 1902, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1902]: "Percival Cuthbert Huth, Second Lieutenant, Shropshire Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The following is an official account of the services for which the DSO was awarded: "Gallant defence of a position against heavy odds on one occasion; carrying a wounded man back under a heavy and accurate fire on another occasion". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the Commander-in-Chief, India, 12 June, 1903; presented at Khaniket 21 July 1903. He was promoted Lieutenant 1 November 1906; Captain 6 October 1914. He served in the European War, 1914-18; was given the Brevet of Major 18 February 1915; was Brigade Major, 16th Reserve Infantry Brigade; 11th Reserve Infantry Brigade, 4 March to 6 September 1915; Temporary Major, 6th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, 14 April 1916 to 2 July 1917; became Major 23 April 1917. He was twice wounded, and was mentioned in Despatches. He married, 27 June 1912, at Ballynatray, Youghal, County Cork, Helena Anna Mary More, daughter of Colonel John Harry Graham Holroyd Smith, CMG, and Lady Harriet Holroyd Smith, daughter of the 5th Earl of Mount Cashell. They had one son, Percival Henry, born 5 November 1915.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's) Shropshire Light Infantry
HuttonGilbert MontgomerieCaptainHUTTON, GILBERT MONTGOMERIE, Captain, was born 13 June, 1865, son of Captain F W Hutton, FRS, late 23rd Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He was educated at Christchurch College, and Canterbury College, New Zealand (BA); became Lieutenant, Royal Engineers, 3 February 1886, and Captain 22 October 1895. He served in the Chin Lushai Expedition (Medal and clasp); in South Africa, 1899-1901; was present at the Relief of Lady-smith, including action at Colenso; during operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; during operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; during operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900), and action at Pieter's Hill; during operations in Natal (March to June, 1900), including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); during operations in the Transvaal, east, of Pretoria, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September). During operations in the Transvaal, November 1900, to May 1901, and October 1901, to February 1902; during operations in Cape Colony, July to October 1901. He was mentioned in Sir R H Buller's Despatches (30 March and 9 November 1900) [London Gazette, 8 February 1901], and received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Gilbert Montgomerie Hutton, Captain, Royal Engineers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was decorated for services in Natal and the Transvaal as Staff Officer, Royal Engineers. Captain Hutton's recreations were 'anything that's going'. He died 19 October 1911.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
HyslopJamesMajorHYSLOP, J, Major, was born 3 March 1856, son of Thomas Hyslop, Wood Park, Kirkcudbrightshire. He was educated at Hutton Hall, Edinburgh University, Berlin, Vienna and Munich (MB, CM, Edinburgh University). He was formerly Assistant Medical Officer, Border Counties Asylum, Melrose, and Assistant Physician, Royal Edinburgh Asylum, Morningside. He was a delegate from the Natal Government to the Conference of South African States and Colonies on Plague, held at Pretoria in 1899. He served in the South African War, and took part in operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop; defence of Ladysmith, including action of 6 January 1900; operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek. In command, Natal Volunteer Medical Corps. Operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal, September and October 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 April 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "James Hyslop, Major (PMO), Natal Volunteers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 29 October 1901. He served in the Natal Native Rebellion, 1905; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 25 June 1907], and received the Medal and clasp. Lieutenant Colonel J Hyslop was Medical Superintendent of the Natal Government Asylum and President of the Natal Medical Council. He published 'Investigation Anatomy of the Central Nervous System'. His favourite recreations were cricket, golf, tennis and photography. He married, in 1882, Christina Flemming Cullen Elphinstone Brown. Lieutenant Colonel Hyslop died 5 October 1917.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Natal Volunteer Medical Corps
InglefieldFrancis SeymourLieutenant ColonelINGLEFIELD, FRANCIS SEYMOUR, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 6 December 1855, at Devonport, son of Rear Admiral Valentine Otway Inglefield, and Mrs Inglefield, daughter of Baron Tiebault. He was educated at private schools; was gazetted to the 15th Foot, as Sub Lieutenant, 13 June 1874; became Lieutenant, East Yorkshire Regiment, 13 June 1874; Captain 30 June 1884. He passed the Staff College in 1885; was Brigade Major at Gibraltar 21 September 1888 to 4 January 1892; was promoted to Major 2 July 1892; was Instructor, Royal Military College, 1 September 1892 to 25 June, 1896. Major Inglefield was on Special Service in South Africa 3 November 1899, to 10 February 1900; was Brigade Major and AAG to General Smith-Dorrien 11 February 1900 to 25 December 1900. He was present at the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February), actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, including actions at Lydenberg (5-8 September); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July and August 1900 (two horses shot); operations in Orange River Colony, March, 1901, to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned twice in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Francis Seymour Inglefield, Lieutenant Colonel, East Yorkshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented there. He was given the Brevet of Colonel 10 February 1904; became Colonel 1 November 1905: was AAG, 7th Division, and GSO, First Grade, 5th Division, 1 November 1905 to 21 July 1909: was created a CB in 1908. He commanded the 12th Infantry Brigade 22 July 1909 to 6 June, 1912; became Major General 7 March, 1912; commanded the 54th East Anglian Division (TF), and the 72nd Division from 1913 and during the European War in England, Gallipoli and Egypt. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 28 January 1916]; brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War on the 24th February 1917, for valuable services rendered in connection with the War; 1914-15 Star; British War Medal and Victory Medal. Major General F S Inglefield married, on 18 July 1885, at St Andrew's Church, Wells Street, London, W Zoe Sophia Barbara, second daughter of Henry Linwood Strong, and they had one son, Valentine Erskine, born on 6 May 1886.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
East Yorkshire Regiment
InglefieldNorman BruceMajorINGLEFIELD, NORMAN BRUCE, Major, was born 6 December 1855, son of Rear Admiral V 0 Inglefield. He was educated at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and entered the Royal Artillery, as Lieutenant, 19 August 1875. Lieutenant Inglefield served in the Afghan War, 1878-79 (Medal). He was promoted Captain 27 August 1884; served as Adjutant, Royal Artillery, 16 November 1884 to 31 January 1889, and attained his Majority 1 October 1892. He was Brigade Major, School of Gunnery, 1 January 1894 to 31 December 1898, and qualified as Interpreter in French in October 1897. He served in the South African War, 1899 to 1902, being employed from 15 June 1901 to 8 July 1902, as DAAG, Field Force. Took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, April to May 1900, in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July 1900; in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Zilikat's Nek; in Orange River Colony, May to July 1900; also in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900; again in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to June 1901; again in Orange River Colony, June 1901 to 31 May 1902 (Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; Queen's Medal with three clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps). He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1902]: "Norman Bruce Inglefield, Major, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Lieutenant Colonel 6 June, 1902; served as Chief Instructor, School of Gunnery, 15 February 1904 to 14 February 1908; was given the Brevet of Colonel 6 June 1905, and became Colonel 13 July 1907. In 1909 he became Brigadier General in command of the South Irish Coast Defences, and was created a CB in 1910. Brigadier General N B Inglefield died at Cork 7 December 1912. He had married, in 1888, Catherine, daughter of W F Burnley, and left one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
Ingouville-WilliamsEdward CharlesMajorINGOUVILLE-WILLIAMS, EDWARD CHARLES, Major (Local Lieutenant Colonel), was born 13 December 1861, son of General Sir J W C Williams, KCB, and of Isabella Georgiana, daughter of John Ingouville, of La Fregoniere, Jersey. He was gazetted to the 3rd Foot, as Second Lieutenant, from the Militia, 23 April 1881, and became Lieutenant, The Buffs, 1 July 1881. He served in the Sudan Expedition, 1884-85 (Nile), as Special Officer for Boats (Staff Captain), and received the Medal with clasp, and Khedive's Star. He was promoted to Captain 1 November 1892; was Adjutant, The Buffs, 20 May 1894 to 21 January 1898. From 22 January 1898 to 10 April 1899, he was specially employed with the Egyptian Army, as Special Service Officer, and served in the Nile Expedition of 1898, taking part in the battles of Atbara and Khartoum. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 24 May and 30 September 1898]; was given the Brevet of Major 16 November 1898; received the Medal and the Egyptian Medal with two clasps. In the Nile Expedition of 1890 he served as DAAG to the Kordofan Field Force, and received a clasp to the Egyptian Medal. He served in the South African War, 1899 to 1902, on Sir Charles Warren's Staff; as Provost-Marshal, November 1899 to 19 May 1900; Brigade Major from May to 31 December 1900; Commanding Mounted Infantry Corps, and Commanding a Mobile Column 1 January 1901 to 25 September 1902; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 17 to 24 January 1900; action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 January 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 1900, and action at Pieter's Hill. Operations in Natal, March to June 1890, including actions at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June). Operations in Orange Free State and Transvaal. Operations in Orange River Colony, January to May 1901. Operations in the Transvaal, May 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette 8 February 1900 (Sir R H Buller); 30 March, 17 June, and 9 November 1900 and London Gazette, 9 July to 11 October 1901]; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 12 October 1901; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps; King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Edward Charles Ingouville-Williams, Major (now Local Lieutenant Colonel), The Buffs (East Kent Regiment). In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented in South Africa. He was transferred to the Worcestershire Regiment 4 April 1903; commanded the 2nd Battalion Worcestershire Regiment, 1904 to 1908, and became Lieutenant Colonel 10 March 1904. He was created a CB in 1910; was Commandant, School of Mounted Infantry, Longmoor Camp 1 March 1910 to 17 June 1912; was given the Brevet of Colonel 25 December 1905; became Colonel 10 March 1908; Temporary Brigadier General 18 June 1912 to 2 June 1915; Commanding 16th Infantry Brigade, Irish Command, 16 June 1912 to 4 August 1914. On the outbreak of war with Germany he took his Brigade to France, commanding it until he was promoted to Major General, in June 1915, for distinguished service in the field, and given command of the 34th Division, which he trained and took to the front in January 1916, being in the front line till 4 July when the division was withdrawn to refit, but was again put into the line, with two fresh brigades to replace the 102nd and the 103rd, which had lost heavily. The Division was in the fighting line till the 19th July when it was again withdrawn to rest and to refit. On the 22nd July Major General Ingouville-Williams went with his ADC to the Bois-de-Mametz to make a personal reconnaissance of the ground where he was to take his Division into action the following week; was caught in a barrage of fire, hit by a piece of shell and killed instantly. He had been mentioned in Despatches four times for his services in the European War.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Buffs) East Kent Regiment
InnesJames ArchibaldLieutenantINNES, JAMES ARCHIBALD, Lieutenant, was born 30 July 1875, son of James Innes, of Roffey Park, Horsham. He joined the Rifle Brigade, and served in South Africa, 1899-1902; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; during operations of 17 to 24 January 1900; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; during operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February and action at Pieter's Hill; during operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900. Also during operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to September 1901; in the operations in Orange River Colony, September to December 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches (Sir R H Buller, 30 March and 9 November 1900 [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]); received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "James Archibald Innes, Lieutenant, Rifle Brigade. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was Captain, Rifle Brigade, 1901 to 1909, and became a Major in the Sussex Yeomanry. Lieutenant Colonel J A Innes married (1st), Marjorie (who died in 1912), third daughter of Abraham John Roberts; and (secondly), in 1914, Barbara, eldest daughter of the Honourable E L Lowther, and they had a son and a daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince Consort's Own) Rifle Brigade
IrvingLewis Erskine WentworthLieutenantIRVING, LEWIS ERSKINE WENTWORTH, Lieutenant, was born in Hamilton, Canada, 16 August 1868, fifth son of Sir Aemilius Irving, KC, Treasurer of the Law Society of Upper Canada, who had fought at Waterloo (Medal), and of Augusta Louisa, daughter of Colonel Gugy, Quebec. He was educated at the Upper Canada College, Toronto, the McGill College, Montreal, and Trinity University, Toronto (MD, CM); became Captain, Canadian Artillery, in 1891; Lieutenant, Royal Canadian Artillery, in 1899; served in the South African War in 1899, and took part in the advance from Beira to Mafeking, in the Rhodesian Field Force. He was mentioned in Despatches 16 April 1901; received the Brevet of Major, 1901; Queen's Medal and four clasps, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Lewis Erskine Wentworth Irving, Lieutenant, Royal Canadian Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa; returned by Lord Kitchener to be forwarded to the Governor-General of Canada, and sent to Colonial Office for transmission to Canada. He was placed on the Reserve of Officers 17 May 1901. Major Irving served in the European War, 1914-18.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Canada contingent
IvesCharles MarshLieutenantIVES, CHARLES MARSH, Lieutenant, was born at Bradfield Hall, Norfolk, 10 September 1872, son of George Ives, of Bradfield Hall, Norwich. He was educated at Queen Elizabeth's School, Ipswich; was a Pastoralist in the interior of Australia; volunteered for active service at the outbreak of the Boer War, South Africa, and was given a commission, and served as Acting Lieutenant of the South Australian Mounted Infantry, taking part in the operations in the Transvaal and Rhodesia. He was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal and five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Charles Marsh Ives, Lieutenant, South Australian Mounted Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 25 July 1901. The following is an account of the particular deed for which he was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order: "The British troops were surrounded at Ottoshoop by Boers, but in touch (by telegraph) with General Lord Methuen's Column. Information was received that the Boers were expecting reinforcements with artillery on a certain date. Lieutenant C M Ives volunteered to locate Boer laager, and ascertain the strength of Boers and artillery. He got through the Boer lines at night, located enemy laager ten miles from British camp, and returned with the necessary information, which enabled General Lord Methuen to surround and capture the laager". He was offered a commission in the British Army, but was unable to accept; volunteered for service in the European War, but failed in eyesight test. He married, 23 June, 1900, at Adelaide, South Australia, Beatrice, daughter of William and Jane Dobbie, and they had two children: Barbara, and Philip, born in 1913.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South Australia contingent
JacksonGeorge Hanbury NobleLieutenantJACKSON, GEORGE HANBURY NOBLE, Lieutenant, was born 20 December 1876. He entered the Army, as a Second Lieutenant in the Border Regiment 20 February 1897, becoming Lieutenant 8 August 1900. He took part in the South African War, 1899 to 1902, serving in 1900 as Adjutant of Imperial Light Infantry, and was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900) and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in the Transvaal, May and June, 1900; operations in Natal (March and June, 1900), including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. For his services he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "George Hanbury Noble Jackson, Lieutenant, Border Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant und Statutes were sent to the GOC, Transvaal; presented by the GOC, South Africa, at Pretoria, 25 March 1903. He became Captain 15 March 1907, and was Adjutant of the Border Regiment 1 October 1907 to 30 September 1910. Captain Jackson served in the European War. After being employed for a period at home, he became GSO3, 13th Division, New Armies, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, 20 January 1915; was promoted Major 18 May 1915; became GSO2, 2nd Australian Division, September 1915, and GS01, of the same Division, December 1915. He served with this Division in the Dardanelles and in France, and as GSO1, 3rd Australian Division in France, from July 1916 to January 1918; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel, June 1910. On 20 January 1918, he was given command of the 87th Infantry Brigade, and became Brevet Colonel 3 June 1919. For his services in the Great War, Major Noble was mentioned in Despatches, and created a CMG in 1917. He married, in 1917, Eileen, youngest daughter of Hume Dudgeon, Merville, Booterstown, Ireland.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Border Regiment
JacksonHerbert KendallMajorJACKSON, HERBERT KENDALL, Major, was born 17 March 1859, son of Thomas Jackson, of Springfield Place, Chelmsford. He was educated at Wellington College, and at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and joined the Royal Artillery, as Lieutenant, 18 December 1878; became Captain 29 October 1886; Major 1 November 1896. He served in the South African War, 1900-1901; was present at the Relief of Mafeking. He received the Queen's Medal with four clasps; Despatches, 16 April 1901, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Herbert Kendall Jackson, Major, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented in South Africa, 14 August 1901, by the Duke of Cornwall and York. He became Lieutenant Colonel 5 August 1904; Brevet Colonel 5 August 1907; Colonel 5 August 1909; Temporary Brigadier General 1 April 1910 to 31 March 1914; Commanding RA, 2nd Division, Aldershot Command; Temporary Brigadier General 5 August 1914; Brigadier General H R Jackson served in the European War, 1914-15. He was twice mentioned in Despatches, and created a CB in 1915. He retired from the Staff 27 December 1917, with the rank of Brigadier General. Major Jackson married, in 1901, Winifred Gladys, daughter of G W Llewhellin, of Brookfield, Blandford, and they had one son and two daughters.

CB (m), DSO, QSA (4) RofM OFS Trans SA 01 (Maj RHA), 1914 Star and Bar (Brig-Gen DSO), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Brig-Gen). Midland Medals 1979 £875.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
M Battery, RHA
JacksonJohn EdwardLieutenantJACKSON, JOHN EDWARD, Lieutenant, was born at Ormskirk, Lancashire, in 1872, the youngest son of Thomas Jackson. He was educated at the Grammar School, Ormskirk. He joined Kitchener's Horse in 1900, and fought right through the South African War, 1899-1901; was present at the Relief of Mafeking, at Paardeberg; took part in the marches to Bloemfontein and to Pretoria, under lan Hamilton; was at the Diamond Hill action; took part in the Wittebergen operations and subsequent pursuit of De Wet, and served for six months in Cape Colony. He received the South African War Medal with seven clasps, and for the conspicuous gallantry displayed by him in the field at Osfontein, Orange River Colony, in 1900, he was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "John Edward Jackson, Lieutenant, Kitchener's Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent, to South Africa, and presented to him by the Officer Commanding, Cape Town District. He was promoted to Captain. Captain Jackson married, in 1902, Winifred Mabel, youngest daughter of B Dennis, St James, Cape Town.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Kitchener's Horse
JacksonThomas DareCaptainJACKSON, THOMAS DARE, Captain, was born 14 June 1876, eldest son of Sir Thomas Jackson, 1st Baronet, and Amelia Lydia Dare. He was educated at Cheltenham College, and joined the Royal Lancaster Regiment 1 December 1897, becoming Lieutenant 16 August 1899. He served in South Africa, 1901-2, taking part in operations in Cape Colony, Orange River Colony and the Transvaal, March 1901 to April 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 17 January 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Thomas Dare Jackson, Captain, King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Captain 7 October 1901; was Adjutant, Royal Lancaster Regiment 11 August 1902 to 10 August 1905; was ADC to Lieutenant General, India; ADC to GOC, Southern Army, India, 22 June 1906 to 21 October 1908. He was promoted Major 3 September 1914. Major Jackson served in the European War, 1914-17. He was in command 1st Battalion King's Own Regiment for 1 year; in command 11th Battalion Manchester Regiment for 1 year; in command 55th Infantry Brigade for 1 year, and retired 6 November 1919, with honorary rank of Brigadier General. He was mentioned in Despatches; received the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1916, and was awarded a Bar to the DSO [London Gazette, 1 January 1918]: "Major and Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Sir Thomas Dare Jackson, Baronet, MVO, DSO, Royal Lancaster Regiment". Lieutenant Colonel T D Jackson succeeded his father as 2nd Baronet in 1915. Sir Thomas Jackson married, 25 January 1919, Mary Lilian Vera, eldest daughter of Brigadier General S E Massy Lloyd, of Westwood House, Ipswich.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Royal Lancaster Regiment
JardineJames BruceLieutenantJARDINE, JAMES BRUCE, Lieutenant, was born in Edinburgh 6 January 1870, eldest son of M L P Jardine, late 86th and 67th Regiments. He was educated at Charterhouse and Sandhurst, and entered the 5th Lancers, as Second Lieutenant, 12 March 1890, becoming Lieutenant 2 July 1892. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, taking part in operations in Natal in 1899, including actions at Elandslaagte, Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop; defence of Ladysmith, including sortie of 7 December 1899, and action of 6 January 1900; operations in Natal, March to June 1900; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900. He received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "James Bruce Jardine, Lieutenant, 5th Lancers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 24 October 1902. He was promoted to Captain 5 October 1901. During the latter part of the South African War he was Staff Officer to Colonel Callwell's Column, and he took part in General French's operations in the South-Eastern Transvaal and Cape Colony. Captain Jardine was attached to the Japanese Army in Manchuria 30 April 1904 to 6 July 1905, during the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-5, and received the Japanese War Medal and the Order of the Sacred Treasure (4th Class). He became Major 2 October 1907. From 1914 to 1918 he served in the European War as Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, 5th Lancers, 23 September 1914 to 31 August 1915; as Temporary Brigadier General 1 September 1915 to 2 March 1917 commanding the 97th Infantry Brigade, New Armies, BEF, and British Armies in France, 1 September 1915 to 2 March 1917. He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 16 January 1917; commanded the 7th Cyclist Brigade Home Forces, in Great Britain, 12 June 1917 to 29 April 1919. He was mentioned in Despatches four times; given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 18 February 1915; created a CMG in 1916, and made an Officer of the Legion of Honour. He married, in 1908, Agnes, eldest daughter of Sir A Hargreaves-Brown, 1st Baronet, and Henrietta, daughter of C R Blandy, of Madeira, and they had two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
5th (Royal Irish) Lancers
JardineWCaptainJARDINE, W, Captain, served in South Africa with the Imperial Light Horse, from 1899 to 1902. He was present in operations in Natal, 1899, including the actions at Reitfontein and Lombard's Kop; the defence of Ladysmith, including the sortie of 7 December 1899, and the action of 6 January 1900; the Relief of Mafeking; operations in the Transvaal, east and west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Frederickstad (17 to 25 October); operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 17 January and 25 April, 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "W Jardine, Captain, 1st Imperial Light Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Captain, Northern Mounted Rifles, Transvaal, 12 December 1902, and Adjutant, 1 July 1907. He took part in the quelling of the Natal Native Rebellion in 1906.
DSO, QSA (3) RofM DofL Trans (SIF 19 Hus), KSA (2) (Capt ILH), Natal 1906 1906 (Capt DSO Trans MR). Spink 1977 £465. March 1978 £650. Spink 1999 no sale. Liverpool 2002 £,2950.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Light Horse
JebbGladwyn DundasCaptainJEBB, GLADWYN DUNDAS, Captain, was born 27 March, 1877, son of Captain J G Jebb, 54th Foot, of Barnby Moor House, Nottinghamshire and of the Honourable Mrs Jebb, sister of the 5th Viscount Melville. He was educated at Charterhouse, and joined the Army 5 September 1896, as a Second Lieutenant in the Bedfordshire Regiment; became Lieutenant 22 January 1898, and Captain 11 January 1902. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; was on Police Duty under Military Governor, Pretoria, 15 June to 4 September 1900, and afterwards as a Signalling Officer from 11 September 1900. He was employed with the Mounted Infantry; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899 to 1900, including the actions at Colesberg, 1 January to 12 February; operations in Orange River Colony, 30 November 1900 to May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches twice [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; awarded the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Gladwyn Dundas Jebb, Captain, Bedfordshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He passed the Staff College; served on the Staff there from May 1908 to May 1912, and held Staff appointments from January 1913 throughout the European War. He was on active service in the European War (Temporary Brigadier General, 1915), from August 1914 till March, 1917. From 5 August to 17 September 1914, he was DAQMG, GHQ, BEF; from 18 September 1914 to 6 February 1915. DAA and QMG, 1st Cavalry Division, BEF; from 7 February to 13 July 1915, he was AAQMG, 2nd Division, BEF; from 31 December 1915 to 1 December 1916, DAQMG, 10th Army Corps, BEF, British Armies in France; from 2 December 1916 to 15 March, 1917, DAQMG, 15th Army Corps, BEF; from 19 June 1917 to 4 March 1918, DAQMG, Northern Army, Home Force; from 5 March 1918, Brigadier General in charge of Administration, Western Command. He was five times mentioned in Despatches, and was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel; created a CMG June, 1916, and CBE December 1919. Brigadier General Jebb married, at Farnborough, 2 January 1912, Norah May daughter of Lieutenant General S H Lornax and Mrs Lomax, and they had two children: David Gladwyn, born 18 December 1912, and Michael, born 18 June 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bedfordshire Regiment
JebbJoshua Henry MilesCaptainJEBB, JOSHUA HENRY MILES, Captain, was born 12 March 1875, second son of J G Jebb, of Barnby Moor House, Notts. He was educated at Charterhouse, and was gazetted to the Manchester Regiment 28 September 1895; became Lieutenant 19 December 1896; was Adjutant, Manchester Regiment, 1 December 1899 to 30 November 1903, and was promoted to Captain 27 December 1899. Captain Jebb served in the South African War, 1900-2, as Station Staff Officer; served as Adjutant, 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment; operations in the Orange Free State, April 1900; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, August to September and November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Biddulphsberg and Wittebergen; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, April 1900; operations in the Transvaal in July 1901; operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Joshua Henry Miles Jebb, Captain, Manchester Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested with the Insignia by the King 18 December 1902. He became Major 8 May 1912, and retired 20 July 1912, and was Lieutenant Colonel Commanding the 4th Battalion Manchester Rifles, 1913 to 1919. He was mentioned in Despatches; was given the Brevet of Colonel, and promoted to Colonel, April, 1919.
DSO, QSA (3) CC Trans Witt (Capt, Man Regt), KSA (2) (Capt Man Regt), Order of the Crown (Prussia) 4th Class. Spink 1964 £45. Lovell 1978 est £390. Neate 1993 £1135.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Manchester Regiment
Page 27 of 59
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