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(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
KinsmanWilliam Augustus CecilLieutenantKINSMAN, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS CECIL, Lieutenant, was born 15 April 1878, son of Harold John Kinsman, Colonel, Royal Artillery, and Emily Anne, daughter of Reverend R Fitzgerald, Ballydonaghue, of Tarbert, County Kerry. He joined the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, as a Second Lieutenant, 21 April 1900, and was promoted Lieutenant 14 December 1901. He served in the, South African War, 1899-1902, and was dangerously wounded; took part in the operations in Natal, 1899 to May 1900; in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony, February to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "William Augustus Cecil Kinsman, Lieutenant, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was an Adjutant of Volunteers and in the Territorial Force 9 October 1906 to 8 October 1911, receiving his Captaincy 13 January 1907; and was Recruiting Staff Officer, Belfast Recruiting Area, 1 April 1912 to 31 March 1914. He served in the European War, being employed as Assistant Inspector of Recruiting, Irish Command, until 11 December 1916, and afterwards as Assistant Inspector of Recruiting. He was Temporary Major from October 1915 to December 1918, and was given the Brevet of Major 1 January 1919. Major Kinsman married, in 1909, Frances Elizabeth, daughter of R J Newell, of Monkstown, County Dublin, and they had one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers
KirbyMark Thomas AnthonyLieutenantKIRBY, MARK THOMAS ANTHONY, Lieutenant, was born at Knightsbridge, London, 4 February 1874, son of Mark Dalton Kirby, late of Windsor. He was educated at Windsor, and joined when he was 18 years of age the Victorian Horse Artillery (Rupertswood Battery; Sir William J Clarke, Baronet). At 23 years of age he joined the Victorian Field Artillery Brigade, and he was selected 28 December 1899, as one of the officers for the 2nd Victorian Contingent for service in South Africa. He served in the South African War, 1900-2; took part in the main advance under Earl Roberts, through Colesberg, Orange Free State and the Transvaal, and was promoted to Captain on the field; received his discharge from the 2nd Victorian Contingent on 9 May 1901, and rejoined the Field Artillery Brigade. Captain Kirby returned to South Africa in command of a squadron of Commonwealth Horse. He was present at the operations in the Orange Free State, including actions at Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill. Operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, including action at Belfast. Operations in Cape Colony. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Mark Thomas Anthony Kirby, Lieutenant, Victorian Mounted Rifles. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented there. Captain Kirby served as ADC to Major General Sir E T Hutton.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Victoria contingent
KirkpatrickHedley JohnLieutenantKIRKPATRICK, HEDLEY JOHN, Lieutenant, joined the Army in 1900, and served in South Africa, 1899-1902, at first with the South Australian Horse. He was mentioned in Despatches, received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1902]: "Hedley John Kirkpatrick, Lieutenant, 6th Dragoon Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to the GOC, Transvaal, and presented at Pretoria 9 December 1903. Lieutenant Kirkpatrick resigned from the 6th Dragoon Guards in 1903.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
6th Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers)
KirkpatrickHenry PownallMajorKIRKPATRICK, HENRY POWNALL, Major, was born in 1862, eldest son of Edward Kirkpatrick, of Tyldesley, Lanes, and of Agnes, youngest daughter of James Pownall, of Peunington Hall, Leigh, Lanes. He was educated at Uppingham, and at Brasenose College, Oxford. He was gazetted to the 16th Lancers 5 December 1883, as Lieutenant, and was promoted to Captain 2 September 1890; was Adjutant, Yeomanry Cavalry, 4 January 1896; and Major, 30 August 1899. He served in the South African War, 1900-2. In command of the 16th Lancers, 11 November 1900 to 4 March 1902; operations in Cape Colony and Orange River Colony, 1900-2. He received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Henry Pownall Kirkpatrick, Major, 16th Lancers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was Second-in-Command of the 16th (Queen's) Lancers, and retired 23 May 1903. He married, in 1898, Ruby, only daughter of Major W B Morris, 7th Hussars. Lieutenant Colonel H P Kirkpatrick died 30 August 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
16th (The Queen's) Lancers
KirkwoodCarleton Hooper MorrisonMajorKIRKWOOD, CARLETON HOOPER MORRISON, Major, was born 4 February 1860, son of J Townsend Kirkwood, of Yeo Vale, North Devon. He was educated at Cheltenham College, and entered the 2nd West India Regiment 14 June 1882; was Garrison Adjutant, Jamaica, 1 December 1885 to 4 August 1886; was promoted Captain 18 January 1888; became Major 22 February 1900. Major Kirkwood served in the South African War, 1900-2, as Commandant, Waterval North, and afterwards Pietpotgietersrust. Operations in Orange River Colony, 1900, including actions at Bethlehem (6 and 7 July) and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to January 1901, and April 1901 to 31 May 1902; operations in Cape Colony, January to April 1901. He was in command of the 2nd Battalion Wiltshire Regiment, from 20 July 1900 to 9 February 1901; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Carleton Hooper Morrison Kirkwood, Major, Wiltshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Major Kirkwood was invested by the King 24 October 1902. He was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 6 January 1906; was given the Brevet of Colonel 6 January 1909; retired with the rank of Colonel 18 June, 1910. During the European War he was employed in France as Commandant on the Lines of Communication from August 1914; was mentioned in Despatches twice, and created a CMG in 1918. His favourite recreations were shooting, golf and fishing.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Duke of Edinburgh's) Wiltshire Regiment
KnatchbullReginald NortonCaptainKNATCHBULL, REGINALD NORTON, Captain, was born 7 February 1872, son of Colonel Norton Knatchbull, late Derbyshire Regiment. He entered the Leicestershire Regiment 4 March 1891, becoming Lieutenant 1 March 1893, and Captain 9 April 1900. He served in the South African War, 1899 to 1900, taking part in operations in Natal in 1899, including the actions at Talana and Lombard's Kop; Defence of Ladysmith, including action of 6 January 1900; operations in Natal (March to June 1900), including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenburg (5 to 8 September). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Reginald Norton Knatchbull, Captain, Leicestershire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to the GOC Troops, Cairo, 10 February 1902, and presented by the OC Troops, Alexandria, 2 March 1902. Captain Knatchbull was Adjutant, Leicestershire Regt, 4 April 1901 to 9 March 1905. He was employed with the Ceylon Volunteers 10 March 1905 to 14 March 1908, and was promoted to Major 10 September 1908. He married, in 1906, Winifred, daughter of W F Peel, and they had one daughter. Lieutenant Colonel Knatchbull died in August 1917, on an Eastern front, from the effects of heat.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Leicestershire Regiment
KnightWyndham CharlesCaptainKNIGHT, WYNDHAM CHARLES, Brevet Major, was born 30 November 1863, son of Captain William Brodnax Knight, late Queen's Bays, and grandson of Edward Knight, of Chawton, Hampshire. He was educated at Cheltenham College and Sandhurst, and was gazetted to the Worcestershire Regiment, as Lieutenant, 25 August 1883, and became Lieutenant, Indian Staff Corps, 29 April 1885, and Captain, Indian Staff Corps, 25 August 1894. He served on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98 (Mohmand), as Section Commandant (September to 5 October 1897). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 11 January 1898]; received the Medal with clasp. He served at Tirah, 1897-98, on the Staff; took part in the action of Dargai; at the capture of the Sampagha and Arhanga Passes; during the operations at and around Dwatoi, and action of 24 November 1897 (Despatches [London Gazette, 5 April, 1898]; clasp). He served in the South African War, 1900-2, as Special Service Officer; afterwards on Staff; took part in the Relief of Kimberley; in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein; in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902 (Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April 1901 and 29 July 1902]; Queen's Medal with five clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps). He was given the Brevet of Major 29 November 1900, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Wyndham Charles Knight, Captain and Brevet Major, Indian Staff Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted to Major, Indian Army, 25 August 1901; was DAAG, Allahabad District, India, from 31 May 1904 to 1908; Lieutenant Colonel 25 August 1909; was Commandant, 4th Indian Cavalry, 1910-12; was ADC to the King from 19 March 1912 to 30 December 1917, and was given the Brevet of Colonel 19 March 1912; was GSO1, Headquarters, India, from 22 July 1912. He commanded the Bombay Brigade, and was Embarkation Commandant from 10 December 1915 to 1917, and was promoted to Major General 1 January 1917; created a CB in 1916; a CSI, in 1917, and a KCIE in 1919. Sir Wyndham Knight married, 23 June, 1896, Harriet Monica, daughter of Francis Johnstone, and they had two sons: Austen Bertram and Christopher Wyndham.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Staff Corps
KnoxArthur RiceMajorKNOX, ARTHUR RICE, Major, was born 8 March 1863, son of Major General T Knox, RA. He was educated at Cheltenham College, and entered the Royal Artillery 21 March 1883; was promoted Captain 19 March 1892; became Major 13 February 1900. He served in the South African War, 1899-1900; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900), and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to October 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Arthur Rice Knox, Major, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901; the Warrant sent 24 January 1902. Major Knox retired 15 April 1908. He died 22 April 1917, of wounds received in action.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
LaingJohnCaptainLAING, JOHN STEWART, Captain, was born in Portpatrick, Scotland on 29 January 1868. At fifteen he went to sea for three years as an apprentice sailor; lived for a period in Brazil and Argentina, settling in South Africa in 1889. He went on active service on 1 October 1899, as a trooper in the Natal Carabineers; served with that regiment for a year and a half, and was then given a troop in the Johannesburg Mounted Rifles. He was three times mentioned in Despatches for his services in South Africa; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "John Laing, Captain, Johannesburg Mounted Rifles. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".He married, in 1901, Agnes Augusta, daughter of William O'Mash, of Oxford. They had one daughter, Sheila Agnes Laing, born 14 Nov 04. Post Boer War travel information:To the ticket issuing clerk, Natal Government Railways, Durban Station. I hereby certify that the bearer, John Laing, was resident in the Transvaal prior to the commencement of hostilities and left on 16 September 1899 on account of the war and he now wishes to return to his home in Johannesburg. As he is in destitute circumstances, and a discharged volunteer, I recommend that a free ticket be issued to him. Signed Lieutenant W Brayshaw. .As a discharged irregular of over 12 months service with a good conduct discharge, he is entitled to a free warrant which has not yet come forward from Cape Town. Signed Lieutenant W Brayshaw. He was employed in the South African Railways and Harbours as an engineer and served with the Wits Rifles (later the 10th Infantry) between the wars. During the Great War he served in South West Africa in the SAEC field engineer with the Northern Force (Temp Capt). He also served in East Africa with an Engineer Detachment. (Temp Capt). Slightly wounded Malangati 24 Jul 16. He caught malaria in early 1916 and was eventually invalided on 19th June 1917. He was admitted to the Mental Hospital at Westkoppies, Pretoria, on 3 April 1917. On 12 April 1917, the Superintendent granted a “Reception Order” for his detention. On 25 June 1917 he was declared to be of unsound mind and his wife was given permission to administer his estate and be sole guardian of their daughter. He died on 2 December 1918. There were two death notices, one signed by the Physician Superintendent at the hospital where John died and dated 3 December 1918 (the day after his death), and the other signed by John's wife, dated 13 December 1918. There is a copy of his Will in which he left everything to his wife and on her death, to his daughter. He appointed his wife, Agnes Augusta Laing (born O'Mash) and Reginald Tomlinson of Pietermaritzburg, Natal, to be the executors of his Will. At the time of his death, his assets included property in Illovo, Johannesburg (£1000), furniture (£196), 1300 shares in Auckland Park Sporting Club (£1,235), 25 shares in the National Bank of SA Ltd (£287), life policy (£500), and Royal Exchange insurance (£535).
DSO, QSA (3) DofL Trans LN (777 Tpr Natal Carb), KSA (2) (Capt DSO JMR), 1914-15 Star (Capt SAEC), BWM, Victory Medal (Capt). Spink 1999. Regimental Rifle Association Shooting Medal, S.A.R.E. (South African Railway Engineers) silver, reverse engraved, "1911-12 G M's SHIELD won by no 5 Coy Capt. J.S. Laing, D.S.O.' (acquired while employed with the South African Railways and Harbours).
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Johannesburg Mounted Rifles
LainsonAlexander JohnCaptainLAINSON, ALEXANDER JOHN, Captain, was born 24 July 1869, only son of J A Lainson, of Horringer House, Bury St Edmund's. He was educated at Elstree and at Harrow. He entered the King's Royal Rifle Corps 28 June 1890; saw active service in Burma, 1891-92, and was present at the operations in the Chin Hills; was promoted to Lieutenant 4 January 1893, and to Captain 18 February 1898. He served in South Africa, 1900, and was present at the defence of Ladysmith. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Alexander John Lainson, Captain, King's Royal Rifle Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia and Warrant were sent to tie Commander-in-Chief in India, and were presented by the Lieutenant General Commanding the Forces in the Punjab 5 March 1902. He retired 22 January 1904. He was promoted Major, Special Reserve Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps, in 1908, and served as Major, Labour Corps. Major Lainson married, in 1907, Ethel Mary, second daughter of John Eardley Yerburgh, of Wavendon Lodge, Buckinghamshire.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Royal Rifle Corps
LambertRobertCaptainLAMBERT, ROBERT, Captain, was born at Weston Green, Thames Ditton, in 1873, son of Captain Lambert, 43rd Light Infantry. He entered the 8th Hussars 29 May 1895; was promoted to Lieutenant 2 September 1896; was Adjutant, 8th Hussars, 14 October 1900 to 3 August 1904; became Captain 14 October 1900. He served in the South African War, 1900-2 (as Adjutant, 8th Hussars, 14 October 1900 to February 1902); was present at operations in the Orange Free State, April and May 1900, including actions at Houtnek (Thoba Mountain) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to November 1900, including actions at Reit Vlei and Belfast (26 and 27 August); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900; operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to February 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches {London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Robert Lambert, Captain, 8th Hussars. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was Adjutant, Montgomery Yeomanry, 1904-10, and retired from the 8th Hussars 2 September 1910. From 1910 to 1914 he was Brigade Major, South Wales Mounted Brigade. He retired in 1916, with the honorary rank of Major, Special Reserve. Major Lambert married, in 1908, Henrietta Isabella, daughter of George Lowther, of Swillington, Yorkshire, and they had one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
8th (The King's Royal Irish) Hussars
LambtonGeorge CharlesCaptainLAMBTON, GEORGE CHARLES, Captain, was born 10 November 1872, fourth son of Lieutenant Colonel Francis W Lambton (third son of William Henry Lambton, youngest brother of the 1st Earl of Durham, and Henrietta Lambton, co-heiress of Cuthbert Ellison, Junior, of Durham), and Lady Victoria Alexandrina Elizabeth Campbell, daughter of the 2nd Earl Cawdor. He was educated at Wellington, and joined the Worcestershire Regiment, 7 December 1895, becoming Lieutenant 2 March 1899, and Captain 23 June 1900. Captain Lambton served in the South African War, 1899-1902, employed with the Mounted Infantry. He took part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July), Ladybrand (2 to 5 September), Bothaville, Caledon River (27 to 29 November); operations in the Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to March 1902; operations in Cape Colony, February to March 1901, and September to October 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette 27 September 1901]: "George Charles Lambton, Captain, Worcestershire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC, Transvaal and Orange Free Stale. He was Adjutant, Indian Volunteers, 16 October 1909 to 25 July 1912, and became Major 4 May 1912. He served in the European War in 1914 and 1915; was Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, Worcestershire Regiment, 6 March 1915 to 5 May 1916; Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, commanding Local Reserve Battalion Royal Fusiliers, 14 July to 31 August 1916; commanding Training Reserve Battalion 1 September 1916 to 17 January 1918; commanding Graduated Battalion 18 January 1918; Acting Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, November 1918. For his services in the European War he was mentioned in Despatches, and given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 3 June 1915.
DSO, OBE (1st m), QSA (4) CC Joh D-H Witt (Capt Worc Regt), KSA (2) (Capt Worc Regt), 1914 Star and Bar (Maj DSO Worc Regt), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Lt Col). Glendinings 2000 est £1,200-1,500.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Worcestershire Regiment
LambtonWilliamMajorLAMBTON, THE HONOURABLE WILLIAM, Major, was born 4 December 1863, son of the 2nd Earl of Durham and of Lady Beatrix, daughter of the 1st Duke of Abercorn, and was a brother of the 3rd Earl of Durham. He was educated at Eton and Sandhurst, and joined the 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards 6 February 1884, as Lieutenant; was Adjutant, Coldstream Guards, 29 December 1888 to 28 December 1892, and became Captain 18 May 1892. He was employed with the Egyptian Army 31 December 1897 to 14 October 1898, and served in the Nile Campaign of 1898; was present at the Battles of Atbara and Oindurman. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898]; received the British Medal, and the Egyptian Medal with two clasps. He was promoted to Major 29 September 1898; was Military Secretary to Lord Milner, the High Commissioner, South Africa, Governor and Commander-in-Chief, Transvaal and Orange River Colony, 8 December 1900 to 29 April 1904. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein (wounded), and was afterwards on the Staff of Lord Milner. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 March 1900, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "The Honourable William Lambton, Major, Coldstream Guards. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 August 1901. He passed the Staff College, 1898. In 1904 he was created a CMG, and in 1907 an MVO. On 28 October 1906, he became Lieutenant Colonel, and on 28 October 1909, was given the Brevet of Colonel, being promoted to Colonel 1 August 1910. He commanded the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards in 1906, and the Coldstream Regiment in 1910, and was AA and QMG, London District, 1 January 1913 to 4 August 1914, and was created a CVO in 1914. He was Assistant Military Secretary to the Field-Marshal, Commanding-in-Chief in France, 5 August to 1 September 1914; was Temporary Brigadier General 2 September 1914 to 2 June 1915; Military Secretary 2 September 1914 to 5 September 1915; Major General 3 June 1915. He was created a CB, 1915; was a Commander of the Legion of Honour, and was created a KCB in 1918, and commanded the 4th Division, September 1915 to September 1917; Battles of the Somme, July and October 1916, and Arras, 1917.
KCB (m), CMG, CVO, DSO, Queens Sudan, QSA (4) Bel M-R OFS Trans, KSA (2), 1914-15 Star, BWM, Victory Medal, 1897 Jubilee, 1935 Coronation, Legion dHonneur (France), Khedives Sudan. National Army Museum, London, 1989.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Coldstream Guards
LamingHenry ThorntonMajorLAMING, HENRY THORNTON, Major, was born 28 July 1863, son of James Laming. He was educated at Eton and Sandhurst; entered the Army 10 March, 1883; became Captain, 1888, and Major 8 July 1898. He served in South Africa, 1899-1902, during operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Talana and Lombard's Kop; taking part in the defence of Ladysmith, including sortie of 7 December 1899, and action of 6 January 1900; taking part in the operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September). He was in command of the 18th Hussars 19 December 1900 to 9 April 1901; afterwards in command of the 24th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry 16 September 1901 to 31 May 1902; during operations in the Transvaal 30 November to September 1901; during operations in the Orange River Colony, September 1901 to 31 May 1902; he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901 (Sir G S White, 23 March 1900; Sir R H Buller, 9 November 1900), and [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]. He received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps; and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Henry Thornton Laming, Major, 18th Hussars. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902; the Warrant was sent 4 November 1902, to Major Laming. He retired from the 18th Hussars 7 October 1903. He served during the European War as Second-in-Command, 11th Reserve (now 5th Reserve) Cavalry. He was given the OBE, 1919. Major Laming married, in 1898, Ella Lostitia, daughter of Robert Cunliffe, DL. They had two sons and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
18th (Victoria Mary, Prince of Wales's Own) Hussar
LangfordCharlesLieutenantLANGFORD, CHARLES, Lieutenant, was born in 1873, son of Captain J C Langford, late 17th Foot. He served in the South African War from 1899 to 1901, with the Imperial Yeomanry. He was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Charles Langford, Lieutenant, 18th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He retired from the 8th King's Royal Irish Hussars. He served in the Great War, becoming Adjutant. Army Service Corps, in 1915, and Major in 1917, and was twice mentioned in Despatches. He married, in 1906, Agnes Sutherland, second daughter of Joseph Matterson, of Castle Tray House, Limerick, and they had one son.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
18th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
LangleyEdgar John FlynnLieutenantLANGLEY, EDGAR JOHN FLYNN, Lieutenant, was born 4 March 1878, son of P R Langley. He served in the South African War, 1900-2, taking part in operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill; operations in Orange River Colony; operations in. Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900, including action at Colesberg. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 2 July 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 2 July 1901]: "Edgar John Flynn Langley, South Australian Mounted Infantry. For gallantry during the action with Major Sladen's force". In the same Gazette [2 July 1901] it was announced that the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel has been given to Major J R F Sladen, the East Yorkshire Regiment, for seizing a large convoy with 200 men and gallantly defending the same, though attacked by superior numbers of the enemy for two hours". Sir A Conan Doyle, in 'The Great Boer War' (page 469), says that "Elliot's column had trekked during the month of May from Kroonstad to Harrismith, and then turning north, found itself upon that date near the hamlet of Reitz. Major Sladen, with 200 Mounted Infantry, when detached from the main body, came upon the track of a Boer convoy and ran it down. Over a hundred vehicles with forty-five prisoners were the fruits of their enterprise. Well satisfied with his morning's work, the British leader despatched a party of his men to convey the news to De Lisle, who was behind, while he established himself with his loot and his prisoners in a convenient kraal. Thence they had an excellent view of a large body of horsemen approaching them with scouts, flankers, and all military precautions. One warm-hearted officer seems actually to have sallied out to meet his comrades, and it was not till his greeting of them took the extreme form of handing over his rifle that the suspicion of danger entered the heads of his companions. But if there was some lack of wit, there was none of heart in Sladen and his men. With forty-five Boers to hold down, and 500 under Fourie, De Wet, and Delarey around them, the little band made rapid preparation for a desperate resistance; the prisoners were laid upon their faces, the men knocked loopholes in the mud walls of the kraal, and a blunt soldierly answer was returned to the demand for surrender. But it was a desperate business. The attackers were five to one, and the five were soldiers of De Wet, the hard-bitten veterans of a hundred encounters. The captured wagons in a long double row stretched out over the plain, and under this cover the Dutchmen swarmed up to the kraal. But the men who faced them were veterans also, and the defence made up for the disparity of numbers. With fine courage the Boers made their way up to the village and established themselves in the outlying huts; but the Mounted Infantry clung desperately to their position. Out of the few officers present Findlay was shot through the head, Moir and Cameron through the heart, and Strong through the stomach. It was a Waggon Hill upon a small scale, two dour lines of skirmishers emptying their rifles into each other at point-blank range. Once more, as at Bothaville, the British Mounted Infantry proved that when it came to a dogged pelting match they could stand punishment longer than their enemy. They suffered terribly. Fifty-one out of the little force were on the ground, and the survivors were not much more numerous than their prisoners. To the 1st Gordons, the 2nd Bedfords, the South Australians, and the New South Welshmen belongs the honour of this magnificent defence. For four hours the fierce battle raged, until at last the parched and powder-stained survivors breathed a prayer of thanks as they saw on the southern horizon the vanguard of De Lisle riding furiously to the rescue. For the last hour, since they had despaired of carrying the kraal, the Boers had busied themselves in removing their convoy; but now, for the second time in one day, the drivers found British rifles pointed at their heads, and the oxen were turned once more and brought back to those who had fought so hard to hold them. Twenty-eight killed and twenty-six wounded were the losses in this desperate affair. Of the Boers seventeen were left dead in front of the kraal, and the forty-five had not escaped from the bulldog grip which held them. There seems for some reason to have been no effective pursuit of the Boers, and the British column held on its way to Kroonstad". Major E J F Langley became Second-in-Command, 13th Regiment Australian (Victoria) Cavalry. He served in the European War, 1914-17.
DSO, QSA (5) CC OFS Joh D-H Belf (S Aus MR), KSA (2) (Lt DSO S Aus IB), 1914-15 Star (Maj 13/LH Regt AIF), BWM, Victory Medal, Croix de Guerre (France) with 2 palms and one star. Sotheby's 1981 est £1,000-1,200.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South Australia contingent
LascellesWalter CharlesCaptainLASCELLES, WALTER CHARLES, Captain, was born 5 July 1867, third son of the Reverend the Honourable J W Lascelles, Canon of Ripon. He was educated at Marlborough, and entered the Army 27 November 1888, becoming Captain 1 January 1897. Captain Lascelles served in the South African War, 1899 to 1900, and was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz, where he was severely wounded. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette 27 Sept, 1901]: "Walter Charles Lascelles, Captain, Durham Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 17 February 1901. Captain Lascelles married, in 1902, Louisa Gertrude, only daughter of Colonel Knox, of Creagh, Ballinrobe, Ireland. He retired 19 October 1904, and died 18 May 1911.
DSO, QSA RofL (Capt Durham LI). DLI Museum, Durham 2000.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Durham Light Infantry
LaurieClaude Villiers EmiliusMajorLAURIE, CLAUDE VILLIERS EMILIUS, Major, was born 25 November 1855, eldest son of Sir Emilius Laurie, 3rd Baronet and Maranne Sophia (who dies in 1909), daughter of Edward R Rice, MP, of Dane Court, Kent. He was educated at Eton, and Trinity College, Cambridge, and served in South Africa, 1900-2, as Commandant at Modder River, and afterwards at Jacobsdal; operations in the Transvaal, west, of Pretoria, September to October and November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, October to November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, Orange River, March to September and November 1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November to January 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, February to May 1902; operations in Cape Colony. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Claude Villiers Emilius Laurie, Major, 3rd Battalion King's Own Scottish Borderers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa." He was created a CB in 1901. He was Lieutenant Colonel, 2/5th King's Own Scottish Borderers 1914-16. Sir CVE Laurie was a Barrister.
CB (c), DSO, QSA (3) CC OFS Trans, KSA (2) (Maj DSO, KOSB). KOSB Regimental Museum, Berwick-upon-Tweed.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Own Scottish Borderers
LawrenceFrederick GeorgeLieutenantLAWRENCE, FREDERICK GEORGE, Lieutenant, was born 21 August 1874, son of Hugh M Lawrence. He was gazetted Second Lieutenant, in the South Wales Borderers 10 October 1894, and became Lieutenant 15 November 1896. He served in South Africa, 1899-1902; as Railway Staff Officer 14 January to 4 March 1900, and 5 March 1900 to 18 August 1902, in Cape Colony, Orange River Colony and the Transvaal; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Frederick George Lawrence, Lieutenant, South Wales Borderers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. He was Adjutant, 3rd South Wales Borderers, Brecon, 1 September 1902 to 13 September 1905; was promoted to Captain 3 March 1906; was Officer, Company of Gentleman Cadets, Royal Military College, 1 February 1910 to, 31 January 1914. He served in the European War; was promoted to Major 28 April 1915; held a Special Appointment, GHQ, BEF, 23 October 1915 to 31 March 1916; Temporary Lieutenant Colonel 1 April to 20 August 1916; DAQMG, 4th Army, British Armies in France, 19 November 1916 to 28 January 1917; AQMG, 15th Army Corps, British Armies in France, 29 January to 15 September 1917. He was AQMG, Southern Command, from 31 March 1918, and Temporary Lieutenant Colonel; GSO3. He married, in 1902, Frances Mary, daughter of Osborne E Mortimer, and they had one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South Wales Borderers
LawsonWilliam Arnold WebsterMajorLAWSON, THE HONOURABLE WILLIAM ARNOLD WEBSTER, Major, was born 10 March 1864, youngest son of the 1st Baron Burnhtun and of Ethel Georgians, only daughter of B N Webster. His elder brother was the 2nd Baron Burnham, now created a Viscount. The Honourable W A W Lawson was educated at Eton and Sandhurst, and entered the Scots Guards in 1884; was promoted to Captain in 1897, and retired to the Reserve of Officers in 1899. He raised the 38th Company, Imperial Yeomanry, in 1899, and commanded the 10th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry in South Africa, 1900-1. He was present at operations in the Orange Free State, March to May 1900; operations in the Orange River Colony, May and June 1900; operations in Cape Colony, March 1900; operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, 30 November 1900 to May 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 7 May and 10 September 1901], received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, was promoted to Major, Reserve of Officers, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "The Honourable William Arnold Webster Lawson, Major, 10th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 29 October 1901. In August 1903, he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel. On the outbreak of war in 1914, he was called up as RSO at Paddington. In September 1914, he raised the 2/1st Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars. He was mentioned in Despatches in 1916; was given the Brevet of Colonel 1 January 1918, and received the War Medal. Colonel Lawson married, in 1887, Sybil Mary (whom he divorced in 1912), eldest daughter of Sir Frederick Marshall; they had two sons and two daughters: Edward Frederick, DSO, MC, Captain, Royal Bucks Hussars, Temporary Acting Lieutenant Colonel, 1/1st Middlesex Hussars (twice mentioned in Despatches), born 1890; William Bernard Webster, Lieutenant, Scots Guards (who was killed in action 22 October 1914, at Steenstraate), born 1893; Margery, married Captain J F Harrison, Royal Horse Guards, and Olive, married Major Jack Murray Smith, Royal Horse Guards.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
10th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
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