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 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
LawtonT ELieutenant ColonelLAWTON, T E, Lieutenant Colonel, joined the Cape Garrison Artillery, and served in the South African War, 1899-1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with a clasp, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "T E Lawton, Lieutenant Colonel, Natal Garrison Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He retired with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Cape Garrison Artillery
LaycockJoseph FrederickCaptainLAYCOCK, JOSEPH FREDERICK, Captain, was born 12 June 1867, only son of R Laycock, MP, and Annie, second daughter of Christian Alhusen, of Stoke Court, Bucks (she married, secondly, Lord D'Arcy Osborne, who died in 1895, brother of the 9th Duke of Leeds). He served in the South African War as ADC to the GOC, Cavalry Division, and was present at operations in Natal in 1899, including actions at Elandslaagte, Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop. He took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the action at Magersfontein, and in the Relief of Kimberley; also in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899 to 1900, including actions at Colesberg (1 January to 12 February). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 4 May 1900, and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: ''Joseph Frederick Laycock, Captain, Nottinghamshire Yeomanry Cavalry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 17 December 1901. He served in the European War, 1914-18 (Nottinghamshire Horse Artillery, Territorial Force); was mentioned in Despatches; given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel; created a CMG in 1917, and a KCMG in 1919. He was Honorary Captain in His Majesty's Army. Sir Joseph Laycock married, in 1902, Katherine M, third daughter of Hugh Henry Hare, and they had two sons and two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Yeomanry
LaytonEdwardCaptainLAYTON, EDWARD, Captain, was born 21 March 1857, and joined the Army, 1877; became Lieutenant, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, 2 July 1890, and was promoted Captain, South Staffordshire Regiment, 20 June 1894. He was Adjutant, South Staffordshire Regiment, 1 February 1899 to 1901. Major Layton served in the South African War, 1900-2, as Adjutant of 1st Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment, from April 1900 to 13 August 1901; operations in the Orange Free State, April and May 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to September 1901; operations in the Transvaal, October 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Edward Layton, Captain, South Staffordshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to the GOC, Natal District, 15 November 1902, and were presented by the Governor of Natal at Pietermaritzburg 19 April, 1903. He was promoted Major, West Yorkshire Regiment, 14 August 1901; was subsequently appointed DAQMG, Natal, and Staff Captain, Middelburg Sub-District, Transvaal. He retired from the Army 21 March 1905. Major Layton died in the early days of the war. He had married, in 1884, Jane Elizabeth, eldest daughter of J Clexton, of Queen's County, and they had one daughter.
DSO, QSA (3) CC Witt Trans (Maj W Yorks Regt), KSA (2) (Maj W Yorks Regt). Spink 1958 £12.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South Staffordshire Regiment
Le GraveWilliamReverendLE GRAVE, THE REVEREND WILLIAM, was born 5 September 1843. He was educated at St Edmund's College, Ware, and was ordained in 1867. He taught mathematics at St Edmumd's College, 1860-78; became a 4th class Chaplain to the Forces 18 January 1878; was promoted 3rd class Chaplain 18 January 1888; 2nd class, 18 January 1893, and 1st class 18 January 1898. He saw service in Malta and Bermuda, and was with the Ashanti Expedition in 1895 and 1896. He served as Senior Roman Catholic Chaplain in South Africa, 1900 to 1902, and was present in operations in Natal, Orange River Colony and the Transvaal, May to 29 November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony and the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "The Reverend William Le Grave, Chaplain (1st Class). In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Invested by the King 18 December 1902. He retired 11 November 1903.
Ashanti Star (unnamed), QSA (3) CC OFS Trans (Rev, C to F), KSA (2) (Rev, DSO, C to F). Spink 1997 est £200-250.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Army Chaplain's Department
Le MarchantLouis St GratienCaptainLE MARCHANT, LOUIS ST GRATIEN, Captain, was born at Little Rissington, Bourton, Gloucestershire, 2 December 1866, son of the Reverend Robert Le Marchant, Rector of Little Rissington. He joined the East Lancashire Regiment 10 November 1886, from the Gloucester Militia; was promoted Captain 11 December 1895; served in the Chitral Expedition in 1895 (Medal and clasp). He was Adjutant, 1st Battalion, from 29 October 1898 to 28 October 1902. Captain Le Marchant served in the South African War, 1900-2, as Adjutant, 1st, Battalion East Lancashire Regiment, taking part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Karee Siding, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May 1900 including action near Johannesburg; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to October 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, October 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901 and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Louis St Gratien Le Marchant, Captain, East Lancashire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1901: the Warrant, sent, 4 November 1902. He was promoted Major 11 April 1906; became Brigade Major, 1906; DAAG, 2 March 1908, and Lieutenant Colonel 1913. When the European War commenced, Lieutenant Colonel Le Marchant accompanied the Expeditionary Force to France and Flanders. He was mentioned in Despatches 19 October 1914, and 10 December 1914, and fell at La Ferte-sous-Jouarre, at the Battle of the Marne, 9 September 1914. He was unmarried. One of the Senior Officers of the regiment, in writing to the family, says: "It is with the deepest regret that I have to inform you of the death of our Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Le Marchant, on Wednesday, 9 September, about 10.30 am The battalion was at that time in action in a town, and he went forward to visit and encourage a party of men who were in a loft of one of the houses. As he reached the loft and passed a small window he was struck by a bullet in the neck and expired immediately. He was, as you know, absolutely without personal fear, constantly exposing himself to danger in encouraging others, and cool and collected in action. To us, as you know, his loss is irreparable, and we can only ask you to accept our deepest sympathy in the grief you must feel. He was loved and honoured by all ranks, but by none more than by those who knew him best".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
East Lancashire Regiment
Le MotteeEdward D'AlbretLieutenantLE MOTTEE, EDWARD D'ALBRET, Lieutenant, was born 20 October 1873, at Guernsey, Channel Islands, eldest son of Colonel John Edward Le Mottee, retired Army Officer, ADC to King Edward VII and King George V, and of Laura Lukin, daughter, of Fred Lukin, of Guernsey. He was educated at Twyford School, Rugby, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and joined the Army 21 January 1893. He became Adjutant, 1893; was retained for a longer term in that appointment, during the South African War, 1899-1902, including the Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Poplar Grove and Driefontein; operations in Orange River Colony; operations in Transvaal (mentioned in Despatches twice; Queen's South African Medal and clasps); Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Driefontein and Transvaal (Queen's and King's Medals and six clasps, 1901-2), and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Edward D'Albret Le Mottee, Lieutenant, Gloucestershire Regiment. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". He became Captain 21 January 1902; Major 8 November 1914, and was appointed GSO2, 9th Division, in the European War; was present at the Battle of Loos 27 September 1915, since when he was missing. He served in India and Aden after passing out of the Staff College in 1905, as DAAG, Brigade Major and DAA and QMG; joined the 1st Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment at home in 1912; commanded Company of Gentlemen Cadets (GSO, 2nd Grade), RMC, 1 August 1914 to January 1915; GSO, 2nd Grade, 9th Division, January 1915; went to France 10 May 1915; known to have very pluckily gone forward into trenches to rally the troops at Fosse 8, Battle of Loos, 27 September 1915. The position was lost, and no more definite news has ever come through of him. He married, 20 November 1912, at St Mary's Church, Eastbourne, Charlotte Muriel Watts, second daughter of George Keiupthorne Watts, and they had one daughter, Ethel Mary. The following are extracts from letters: "You will have heard by now that we are unable to trace the whereabouts of your husband. He very pluckily went forward on the morning of 27th September to a place called Fosse 8, where there were very heavy casualties and fighting, and went into the trenches to rally the troops, and he did not return, and all inquiries failed to get any news of him. The position he went up to was retaken by the Germans, so there is a chance that he may have been slightly wounded and unable to get away, and that he is in their hands. I cannot say how sorry I am at this bad news. Your husband was a great friend of mine, and we are all very sad at his being unaccounted for. We can only hope he is in good hands and some news may come through of him soon.—With very sincere sympathy from us all". "I am most grieved at this distressing news. But you must not despair, in spite of all the anxiety you will feel, for until there is definite news hope cannot be gone. Any news I get, of course you shall have, but it is hard to get any. I am so very, very sorry for you, for your anxiety must be terrible, and my most heartfelt sympathy is with you. Your husband was such a help to me always, and I pray that better news may be forthcoming". "I was very sorry to hear the sad news. Your husband was a great friend of mine, and we worked together for all those months so happily. You know how much I grieve his loss, and how sincerely I sympathize with you". "I am sorry to say there is no more news, but I do not think we can expect any now unless it comes through from the German side. A message was received from your husband about 5.45, 27 September 1915, saying he was coming back, and asking for a car to be sent to Vermelles (the limit for cars) to meet him. As the situation was an anxious one, General Thesiger went down to Vermelles in the car to meet your husband and hear the latest news from him of Fosse 8. After General Thesiger had started, affairs at Fosse 8 became very critical, and the General evidently went up there to try and re-establish the situation. Your husband must have gone with him, and has not been heard of since. I feel so much with you, and one cannot do anything to clear up the situation; but I don't despair, as I don't see any reason why he should not be in the hands of the Germans".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Gloucestershire Regiment
Le Roy-LewisHermanLieutenant ColonelLE ROY-LEWIS, HERMAN Lieutenant Colonel, was born 27 June 1860, second son of General Robert Le Roy and Amelia, cousin of J Delaware Lewis, MP. He was educated at Eton, and at Trinity College, Cambridge (MA), and became a Member of the Inner Temple; was an FRGS and FSS, and was DL and JP for Hampshire, and assumed the additional name of Lewis in 1884. He became Major, Hampshire Yeomanry Cavalry (Carabiniers) 3 July 1895, and Lieutenant Colonel 20 April 1901, and served in the South African War, 1899-1901, as Commandant of a Battalion of Yeomanry (3 October to 31 December 1900), and afterwards as Commandant, Imperial Yeomanry, Cape Town (graded as an AAG). Operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900. Operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900. Operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, August 1900. Operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July and September to November 1900. Operations in Orange River Colony, including actions at Lindley (1 June) and Rhenoster River. Operations in the Transvaal 30 November to December 1900. Operations in Orange River Colony, December 1900 to January 1901. Operations in Cape Colony, January to February 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Herman Le Roy-Lewis, Lieutenant Colonel, Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 17 December 1901. He was a DAAG, Headquarters of Army, from 1901; a Member of the Auxiliary Force Advisory Board from 1902; Brigade Commander, 1st South-West Mounted Brigade, from 1908 to 1912. He became Colonel. He was Military Attache in Paris, 1915 to 1919. He received the Territorial Decoration in 1909; was created a CB in 1912, and a CMG in 1918; was a Commander of the Legion of Honour and was awarded the Croix de Guerre avec Palme; the Belgian Croix de Guerre; the Order of Danilo, 2nd Class (in 1917), and the Crown of Roumania. He wrote articles for the 'National Review', the 'United Service Magazine', 'The National Defence Magazine', 'Baily's', 'The Army Review', etc. Colonel Lewis married, in 1888, Kathleen Teresa Turner, eldest daughter of A H Turner Newcomen, of Kirkleatham Hall, Yorkshire, and they had one son, Henry, born 28 February 1895, and four daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Yeomanry
LeckieJohn EdwardsLieutenantLECKIE, JOHN EDWARDS, Lieutenant, was born in Canada 19 February 1872, son of Major R G Leckie, Sudbury, Ontario. He was educated at Lennoxville; graduated from the Royal Military College after four years' course; postgraduate course at King's College (BSc); served in the South African War as Lieutenant (16 March 1901), Lord Strathcona's Horse, and Captain, 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles. He was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "John Edwards Leckie, Lieutenant, Lord Strathcona's Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented by Major General Stephenson at Friedrichstad 4 April 1904. He became Captain, 72nd Seaforth Highlanders of Canada, and was promoted Major in the same regiment 30 September 1913. He served throughout the European War from 1914, and commanded the 16th Battalion Canadian Scottish from 1915. He became Colonel, and was created a CMG in 1917. Colonel Leckie was a mining engineer, and was a member of the Canadian Mining Institute and American Institute of Mining Engineers.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Canada contingent
LeckyFrederic BeauchampMajorLECKY, FREDERIC BEAUCHAMP, Major, was born 11 October 1858, son of John Frederic Lecky, DL, of Ballykealey, Tullow, County Carlow. He was educated at Uppingham School, and at the RMA, Woolwich, and entered the Royal Artillery 31 January 1878. He took part in the Egyptian Expedition, 1882, and was present at the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir (Medal and clasp, and Bronze Star). He became Captain 24 March 1886, and Major 1 April 1896. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; was present at the Relief of Kimberley; at the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Reitvlei and Belfast (26 and 27 August); operations in the Transvaal, 30 November 1900 to January 1902, and March to 31 May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, January to March 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Frederic Beauchamp Lecky, Major, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 August 1901. He became Lieutenant Colonel 17 August 1903; was given the Brevet of Colonel 17 August 1908, and retired with the rank of Colonel 17 August 1908.
DSO, Egypt (1) Tel El Kebir (Lt 1/2 Bde), QSA (6) RofK Paard Drief Joh D-H Belf (Maj DSO T Batt RHA), [KSA (2)], Khedives Star. Spink 1983 £400. Christies 1991 est £450-500. Neate 1993 £1,100. Dixon 1994 £795.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
LeeGeorge LeonardMajorLEE, GEORGE LEONARD, Major, was born at West Maitland, New South Wales, 25 June 1860, son of John Leonard Lee, Leeholme, Paterson, New South Wales, and of his wife, Mary Ann Lee. He was educated at the Grammar School, Armidale, New South Wales; entered the Military Forces in 1888, and commanded the New South Wales Lancers in the South African War, 1899-1900. He was present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February) and actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal, May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Reit Vlei and Belfast; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including actions at Colesberg (1 January to 12 February). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901 ]: "George Leonard Lee, Major, New South Wales Lancers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to Australia, and presented by Brigadier General Finn at Sydney 26 April 1902. He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel, and was on the Instructional Staff, New South Wales Military Forces. After the outbreak of the European War he was appointed Brigadier General, commanding 2nd Military District (Queensland), Military Forces of the Commonwealth. He was created a CMG in 1917, and promoted to Major General. He married, at Homebush, New South Wales, 2 January 1896, Emma Ormo Town, daughter of Andrew Town, of Richmond, New South Wales.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
New South Wales contingent
LeesElliottCaptainLEES, SIR ELLIOTT, 1st Baronet, Captain, was born in Lancashire 23 October 1860, son of T Evans Lees, of Woodfield, Oldham, and Bernarda, daughter of Elliott Bay Turnbull. He was educated at Eton, and Christ Church, Oxford (MA). He married, in 1882, Florence, daughter of Patrick Keith, and they had three sons and five daughters. He was MFH, South Dorset Hunt, 1885-86, and winner of the House of Commons Point-to-Point, 1888-90. He contested Rochdale in 1885; was MP for Oldham, 1886-92; defeated Sir J T Hibbert in 1886, but was defeated by him in 1892. He contested Pontefract in 1893; was MP for Birkenhead, 1894—1900, and for some years subsequently, and was a Director of the 'People' newspaper. He was created a Baronet in 1897. Sir Elliott Lees served in the South African War in 1900, in command of the 26th Dorsetshire Company, Imperial Yeomanry; was twice mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Sir Elliott Lees, Baronet, Captain, 7th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 29 October 1901. He became Honorary Lieutenant Colonel, Dorset (Queen's Own) Yeomanry. Sir Elliott Lees died 10 October 1908, and was succeeded by his eldest son, Thomas Evans Keith Lees, who became the 2nd Baronet.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
7th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
LefroyBertram PercevalLieutenantLEFROY, BERTRAM PERCEVAL, Lieutenant, was born 18 May 1878, in London, son of Thomas Charles Perceval Lefroy, of 11, Ashburn Place, London, and Isabella Napier, daughter of Alexander Hastie, of Carnock, Fifeshire. He was educated at Harrow and Sandhurst, and joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 7 May 1898; became Lieutenant 10 May 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1901 (dangerously wounded); was present at the Relief of Ladysmith; took part in the operations in the Transvaal in June 1900; in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July 1900; in Orange River Colony, June 1900; in the Transvaal, December 1900 to August 1901; also during the operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in September 1901, including defence of Fort Itala. He was mentioned in Despatches 11 October 1901; received the Queen's South African Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 11 October 1901]: "Bertram Perceval Lefroy, Lieutenant, The Royal Dublin Fusiliers". The DSO was awarded "for gallantry in the Defence of Forts Prospect and Itala". The defence of the two forts, though so few were engaged, was considered one of the most brilliant affairs in the war, the attacking force being about four times the number of the defenders, and the Boer loss larger in proportion than in almost any other action. Major Chapman was in command at Fort Itala. Lieutenant Lefroy (with Lieutenant Kane, South Lancashire Regiment, who was killed) commanded about 90 of the Mounted Infantry at the outpost on the top of Itala Hill. He himself shot Potgieter, the enemy commander, and was very severely wounded. Lord Kitchener himself sent in Lieutenant Lefroy's name for the DSO, and for his promotion, in getting which he was transferred to the 3rd Battalion The Royal Warwickshire Regiment. The latter eventually proved in some ways unfortunate, as this battalion was one of those subsequently done away with, and caused Captain Lefroy a serious loss of seniority. The following is an extract from a letter written by Lieutenant B P Lefroy while he was lying wounded after Itala (he had been wounded in four places, two of which just escaped being fatal): "When we heard that we were going to be attacked at Itala, I was sent right up to the top of the Itala Hill with about 90 men, to try and hold it, and prevent the Boers from attacking the camp from that direction. At about 2 am, 26 September, they attacked my post five or six hundred strong. It was fairly dark, and the ground was covered with little rocks, which made it very hard to distinguish people. We kept up a heavy fire on both sides. They worked right round our right, and then rushed the position. It was a very plucky rush, but as they were about five to one, we couldn't keep them out, and it ended in a sort of grand melee. I have a vivid recollection of popping off my revolver with Boers all round me, and then I got too full of lead to continue the operation. They took about 37 prisoners and held the position all day. We people with bullets in us had to lie all day on pur backs in the sun, and we didn't get down again till 3 am next morning, when the people in the camp, finding the Boers had cleared, sent up for us. It was bitterly cold during the night, and a damp mist. The camp held out splendidly all night and day, until the Boers didn't think it worth while losing any more men. There were about 1,500 Boers, and about 300 of us, so we didn't do so badly". He became Captain 2 August 1902. After the Boer War, he served in England, Gibraltar, again in South Africa, returned to England, and went through the Staff College. At the outbreak of the Great War he was holding an appointment as General Staff Officer at the War Office. In August 1914/he went out on the Staff of the First Division. After seven months he returned to England to serve on the Staff of the 26th Division at Warminster until July 1915, when he went out to command the 2nd Battalion Warwickshire Regiment. He was made Brevet Major in the King's Birthday Honours List, 1915; Major 8 August and Lieutenant Colonel 1 September 1915. Lieutenant Colonel Lefroy was fatally wounded at the Battle of Loos 25 September 1915, and died in the Field Ambulance on the 27th. He was three times mentioned in Despatches during the War (17 September 1914; 14 January 1915 and 31 May 1915); received the Cross of the Legion of Honour. He was much beloved by his men, and they would have followed him anywhere. The dying message he left for them was made a battalion order, and will not be forgotten by those of the old regiment who survive. It was: "Tell them my last thoughts are with them. I pray that their bravery in the hour of severe testing may win them through to success. Would to God I had been spared to serve and lead them a little longer. But as it is I trust that the men of the Warwickshire Regiment will pull together, work together and uphold the credit, the good name and the traditions that the Regiment has so nobly won. May God's blessing rest on them in their hour of danger or peace, and may the heroic self-sacrifice of their officers, non-commissioned officers and men who have fallen inspire them to deeds of unfaltering and unfailing bravery".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Dublin Fusiliers
LeggettArchibald HerbertLieutenantLEGGETT, ARCHIBALD HERBERT, Lieutenant, was born in 1877, son of Major G E Leggett, late 77th Regiment of Foot. He was educated at Clifton College, and received his first commission in the Royal Scots Fusiliers 15 May 1897. He served as Adjutant of the 2nd Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers, 1899 to 1902, in the South African War, and was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February), and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in the Transvaal, May and June 1900; operations in Natal, March and April 1900; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Frederiekstad (17 to 25 October); operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900, to 31 May 1902; was promoted Captain 25 September 1901, and was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Archibald Herbert Leggett, Lieutenant, West Yorkshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902. Captain Leggett was Instructor, Royal Military Academy, from 1903 to 1907, and served from 1908 to 1910 in Japan, being attached to the British Embassy at Tokyo, 1909 to 1910, serving for six months with the 29th Regiment of Infantry, Imperial Japanese Army, and passing as a 2nd Class Interpreter in Japanese. He was Brigade Major of the Hampshire Infantry Brigade from 1911 to 1913, when he retired from the Service (19 June). He served in the European War from 1915 to 1918, commanding the 5th (Territorial) Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers from 1915 to 1917, and the 156th Infantry Brigade from 1917 to 1919. He was awarded a Bar to the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 12 March 1917]: "Archibald Herbert Leggett, DSO, Reserve of Officers, late Royal Scots Fusiliers. For conspicuous gallantry, coolness and resource when in command of an infantry battalion. He showed exceptional powers of leadership when attacked by the enemy, upon whom he inflicted a severe defeat". He was given the Brevets of Major 3 January 1916, and of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 918; was created a CMG in 1918; was four times mentioned in Despatches, and was awarded the Russian Order of St Ann, 3rd Class, in 1916. On demobilization, 20 March 1919, he was given the rank of Honorary Brigadier General. Brigadier General A H Leggett married, in 1903, Lilian Rose, eldest daughter of Major J C O'Neal, late Inniskilling Dragoons, and they had two sons and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince of Wales's Own) West Yorkshire Regiment
LeggettEdward Humphrey ManistyLieutenantLEGGETT, EDWARD HUMPHREY MANISTY, Lieutenant, was born 7 December 1871, son of Major G E Leggett, 77th Regiment. He was educated at Clifton College, and at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich (Pollock Gold Medallist, 1900), and on the Staff of the London and North Western Railway. He was Board of Trade (British) Delegate to the International Railway Congress, 1895. He became Second Lieutenant, Royal Engineers, 25 July 1890; Lieutenant, 25 July 1893; Railway Traffic Manager, Woolwich Arsenal, 15 August 1895 to 6 October 1899. He served in the South African War, as Deputy Assistant Director of Railways, 30 October 1899 to 26 November 1901; was Deputy Assistant Director of Railways, Headquarters, South Africa, 27 November 1901 to 1 July 1902, and Officer Commanding National Scouts and Orange River Colony Volunteers. He was present at operations in the Orange Free State; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1909, including actions near Johannesburg and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900; operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; was given the Brevet of Major 26 June 1902; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Edward Humphrey Manisty Leggett, Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC, Transvaal, and presented by the GOC, Forces in South Africa, at Pretoria, 25 March 1903. He was promoted to Captain 1 April 1901, and was employed under the Civil Government in the Transvaal, 20 October 1902 to 14 February 1906; was employed in the East African Protectorate 1 February 1907 to 1910, being lent to the Colonial Office for special duty under the Council of the British Cotton-Growing Association in East Africa and Uganda, 1907-10. Member of the Legislative Council of British East Africa, 1908-9; retired from the Army, with the rank of Major, 4 February 1911. Major Leggett married, in 1907, Ada, daughter of John Dyson, of Merriott, Crewkerne, formerly Judicial Commissioner of Oudh.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
LeighChandosLieutenantLEIGH, CHANDOS, Lieutenant, was born in August 1873, son of the Honourable Sir E Chandos Leigh, KC, of 45, Upper Grosvenor Street, London, and of Lady Leigh. He was educated at Harrow and Cambridge, and joined the King's Own Scottish Borderers, through the Warwickshire Militia, 29 May 1895, becoming Lieutenant 22 Sept, 1897. He served in the South African War, 1900-2, employed with the Mounted Infantry, and took part in the Relief of Kimberley; operations in Orange Free State, 1900, including operations at Paardeberg; actions at Poplar Grove, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Diamond Hill; operations in Orange River Colony in 1900, including actions at Wittebergen and Bothaville; operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September. 1901]: "Chandos Leigh, Lieutenant, King's Own Scottish Borderers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 29 October 1901. He was promoted to Captain 1 April 1901. Captain Leigh then spent ten years in the Egyptian Army. He took part in the operations against the Nyam Nyam Tribes in the Bahr-el-Ghazal Province, and received the Orders of the Medjidie and Osmanieh, and the Bahr-el-Ghazal Medal and clasp. Major Leigh went to France with his regiment, and was reported missing on the 23rd August 1914, at Mons. When last seen he was, though wounded, waving his men on, and telling them not to mind about him. Six months later returned wounded prisoners reported that he died in August 1914, of wounds received in action at Mons. He was the first Harrovian to fall in the war. His only brother, Lieutenant E H Leigh, 2nd Battalion Rifle Brigade, was killed on the Aubers Ridge in May 1915, and their grief-stricken father died three days later. Major Leigh was a fine steeple-chase rider and polo player, as well as a keen cricketer and rider to hounds. He married Winifred, daughter of Right Honourable A F Jeffreys, MP, of Buckham, Hampshire.
DSO, QSA (6) CC Paard Drief Joh D-H Witt SA 01 (Capt KOSB), Order of the Osmanieh (Turkey) 4th Class, Khedives Sudan Nyam Nyam. Spink 1981 £1,200. Spink 1983 £1,200. Spink £1985 £1,100. Spink 1989 £985.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Own Scottish Borderers
LempriereHenry AndersonCaptainLEMPRIERE, HENRY ANDERSON, Captain, was born 30 January 1867. He was gazetted to the 7th Dragoon Guards 14 March 1888, becoming Lieutenant 23 December 1891. He was Adjutant, 7th Dragoon Guards, 1 April 1900 to 8 February 1903, and was promoted Captain in January 1898. Captain Lempriere served in the South African War, 1899-1902, on the Staff; as Adjutant, 7th Dragoon Guards, from April 1900 to 31 May 1902, and as DAAG till 26 June 1902. He was present at operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, 1900, including action at Belfast (26 and 27 August); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, March 1900; operations in the Transvaal, December 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, February 1901 to 31 May 1902; operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in October 1901; operations in Cape Colony, December 1900 to February 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]: was given the Brevet of Major 22 August 1902; placed on the list of officers considered qualified for Staff employment in consequence of service on the Staff in the Field; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Henry Anderson Lempriere, Captain, 7th Dragoon Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC, Natal District, 15 November 1902, and the Insignia were presented to Captain Lempriere by Major General Fetherstonhaugh at Pietermaritzburg 24 December 1902. He was Adjutant, Cavalry Depot, 9 February to 5 May 1903; became Major 1 April, 1903; was Brigade Major, 3rd Cavalry Brigade, 3rd Army Corps, 23 May 1903 to 21 January 1904. He was at the Staff College in 1904; was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel in 1911. Lieutenant Colonel Lempriere served in the European War in 1914, and was killed in action 23 December 1914.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
7th (The Princess Royal's) Dragoon Guards
LeslieGCaptainLESLIE, G, Captain, served in South Africa, 1900, as Medical Officer to Roberts's Horse. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "G Leslie, Medical Officer, Captain, Roberts's Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to the Colonial Office, and presented privately 30 November 1903.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Roberts' Horse
LethbridgeErnest Astley EdmundCaptainLETHBRIDGE, ERNEST ASTLEY EDMUND, Captain, was born 26 December 1864, second son of Sir Wroth A Lethbridge, 4th Baronet, and of Anne Williams Benyon. He was educated at Eton, and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; entered the Army 10 October 1885; promoted Captain 27 September 1893; Major 2 September 1904, and Lieutenant Colonel 25 October 1913. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; was present at the Relief of Kimberley; during operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February), actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein; during operations in Orange River Colony, May to November 1900; taking part in the operations in Orange River Colony, December 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches twice [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal and three clasps; King's Medal and two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 Sept, 1901]: "Ernest Astley Edmund Lethbridge, Captain, Oxfordshire Light Infantry. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902. He served during the European War; commanded the 1st Battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry in Mesopotamia from 1914 to April, 1916, to the termination of the Siege of Kut; he was three times mentioned in Despatches, and created a CMG, 1910 and received the Brevet of Colonel.
CMG, DSO, QSA (3) RofK Paard Dreif, KSA (2), 1914-15 Star, BWM, Victory medal with MID, Order of Leopold (Belgium) 5th Class. KRRC Regimental Museum, Winchester 1996.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Oxfordshire Light Infantry
LewinArthur CorrieCaptainLEWIN, ARTHUR CORRIE, Captain, was born 26 July 1874, son of Frederick T Lewin, DL, of Castlegrove, County Galway, and Cloghans, County Mayo, and of Lucy, daughter of William Byrom Corrie, of Cheltenham. He was educated at Cheltenham College, and at Trinity Hall, Cambridge; was gazetted to the King's Regiment 7 December 18957 became Lieutenant, 4 February 1899, and Captain 5 December 1900. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, with the 1st Mounted Infantry, taking part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg, actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal, June 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, June to November 1900, including actions at Rhenoster River and Wittebergen. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; awarded the Queen's Medal and five clasps; the King's Medal and two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Arthur Corrie Lewin, Captain, The King's (Liverpool) Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". In 1905 he was transferred to the 19th Hussars, and he retired from that Regiment 25 January 1908, and was appointed to the 3rd Battalion Connaught Rangers, in which he was promoted to Major in 1910, and of which he assumed the command in 1913. In the war of 1914-19 he served in the Dardanelles Campaign; was appointed to the command of the 5th (Service) Battalion Wiltshire Regiment, September 1915, and promoted Brigadier General, 40th Infantry Brigade, October 1915. On the evacuation of Suvla he was transferred to Helles, and took part in the final withdrawal from that place. From 1916 to 1919 Brigadier General Lewin served in Mesopotamia. He took part in the operations with the Kut relieving force in 1916; the advance on Baghdad, and the subsequent fighting up to, and including, the final overthrow of the Turkish forces on the Tigris at the Battle of Shergat, October 1918, during (the latter fighting in command of the column operating against the Turkish right wing. He commanded Troops in North Persia, July to September 1918. He was mentioned in Despatches six times; was awarded the British and Allies' Medals, and the 1915 Star. He was created a CMG 1916; CB 1916; was given the Brevet of Colonel in 1917; was appointed ADC to the King 1918. He also has the Order of St Anne of Russia. He relinquished his commission in 1919. He was a Magistrate for County Galway; was High Sheriff, County Mayo, 1912. In 1900 Brigadier General Lewin married Norah Constance, daughter of William Higgin, of Rosganna, Carrickfergus, and they had two sons: Patrick William, born in 1903, and Thomas Chippindale Colquitt, born in 1907.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's) Liverpool Regiment
LewisBridges GeorgeMajorLEWIS, BRIDGES GEORGE, Major, was born 3 March, 1857, son of the Reverend G B Lewis. He was educated at Uppingham and Sandhurst, and was gazetted to the 30th Foot 27 March 1878, becoming Lieutenant, East Lancashire Regiment, 31 July 1879. He was Instructor of Musketry, East Lancashire Regiment, 6 April 1881 to 1 November 1889; Captain 18 March 1885; Adjutant, 2nd Battalion East Lancashire Regiment, 1 April 1888 to 31 March, 1892; Adjutant, Militia, 18 February 1893 to 17 February 1898; Major 14 March 1895. He served in the South African War, 1900-01; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May 1900, including actions near Johannesburg; operations in the Transvaal to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, February 1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to July 1901, and August to October 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, July to August 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Bridges George Lewis, Major, East Lancashire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to South Africa, and he was invested by the Commander-in-Chief 30 December 1901. He became Lieutenant Colonel 23 September 1901; was given the Brevet of Colonel 23 September 1904; commanded the 1st Battalion East Lancashire Regiment; became Colonel 25 February 1907; retired 23 March 1910. Colonel Lewis served in the European War, 1914-18, as Temporary Brigadier General, commanding 56th Infantry Brigade, 2nd New Army, from September 1914. He was given the honorary rank of Brigadier General 13 November 1917, and was created a CB, 1918. He was a JP, County Carlow. Brigadier General Bridges married (1st), in 1879, Mary (who died in 1917), daughter of the Reverend Canon Burn-Murdoch; and they had one son and one daughter. He married (secondly), Laura Montgomery, daughter of the Reverend W Glean, and they had one son.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
East Lancashire Regiment
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