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(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
LewisRichard CharlesCaptainLEWIS, RICHARD CHARLES, Captain, served in the South African War, 1900-1, in command of 1st Tasmanian Imperial Bushmen, and was present at the operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Rhenoster Kop. Operations in Orange River Colony, 1900, including actions at Lindley, Bethlehem and Wittebergen. Operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to February 1901; April and June 1901. Operations in Cape Colony, February to March 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 April 1901]; received the Queen's Medal and four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Richard Charles Lewis, Captain, Tasmanian Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented there. He was awarded the Volunteer Decoration in 1906. Lieutenant Colonel Lewis was the Officer Commanding the Australian Garrison Artillery, Tasmania.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Tasmania contingent
LichtenburgJohn WillsLieutenantLICHTENBURG, JOHN WILLS, Lieutenant, was born 19 June 1872, and joined the Army on 21 April 1900, as a Second Lieutenant in the 18th Hussars; became Lieutenant 1 May 1901. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902 (severely wounded). Took part in the operations in the Transvaal, December 1900 to September 1901, and November 1901 to 31 May 1902; in Orange River Colony, March and May 1902; also during the operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in September and October 1901; he was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 11 October 1901]: "John Wills Lichtenburg, Lieutenant, 18th Hussars. For gallantry in action on Oliphant's River (Maseppa Drift) 30 June 1901. Dated 30 July 1901". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902. He was promoted Captain on 29 November 1904. Captain Lichtenburg died 15 March 1912.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
18th (Victoria Mary, Prince of Wales's Own) Hussar
LilleyJames LindsayLieutenantLILLEY, JAMES LINDSAY, Lieutenant, was born in 1871. He joined the Victorian Military Forces; served in the South African War, 1900-1, and took part in operations in the Orange Free State. He was dangerously wounded. Lieutenant Lilley was also present at the operations in Cape Colony. He served as Adjutant, Victorian Contingent, from 13 January to 30 April, 1900; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "James Lindsay Lilley, Lieutenant, Victorian Mounted Rifles. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia was sent to South Africa; forwarded to the Colonial Office for transmission to Australia; sent to the Governor of Victoria, and presented by the Commanding Officer 27 December 1901. He retired from the Victorian Mounted Infantry in 1901. Captain Lilley married, in 1913, Olive Agatha Hope, youngest daughter of Reverend C E Cummings and Mrs Geoffrey Ffolkes, of Smytham, Little Torrington, Devon.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Victoria contingent
LindsayWalter Fullerton LodovicLieutenant ColonelLINDSAY, WALTER FULLERTON LODOVIC, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 15 May 1855, son of Captain Alexander Lindsay, 8th Hussars, and of Jane Christian, daughter of M Lindsay Carnegie, of Spynie and Boysack. He was educated at St Andrews and Wimbledon School, and was gazetted to the Royal Artillery as Lieutenant 28 January 1875; served in the Egyptian Expedition of 1882, being present at the action of Kassassin and at the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir (Medal with clasp, and Bronze Star). He was promoted to Captain 1 January 1884, and Major 27 January 1892. Major Lindsay served in the South African War from 1899 to 1900, and took part in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River (severely wounded) and Magersfontein; in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including the operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Karee Siding, Yet River (5 arid 6 May) and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal, May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 26 January 1900]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Walter Fullerton Lodovic Lindsay, Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 3 June, 1901. He had become Lieutenant Colonel 14 November 1900, and he was given the Brevet of Colonel 10 February 1904, becoming Colonel 29 November 1905. He was Staff Officer for Horse and Field Artillery, Southern Command, 29 November 1905 to 20 July 1906. Commander of Horse and Field Artillery, Southern Command, 20 August 1906 to 19 August 1907; Temporary Brigadier General, Commanding Artillery, 3rd Division, Southern Command, 20 August 1907 to 30 September 1908; Inspector of Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery 1 October 1908 to 30 April, 1912; promoted to Major General 7 February 1912; GOC, West Lancashire Division, Western Command, 3 June 1912 to 4 August 1914. He served in the European War, 1914-15, as Major General Commanding Royal Artillery from 5 August 1914, and Inspector of Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery from March 1915 to 8 April, 1915. For his services in the European War he was mentioned in Despatches, and created a KCB (1916). Sir Walter Lindsay retired in October 1917.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
ListerThomasLieutenantLISTER, THE HONOURABLE THOMAS, Lieutenant, was born in 1878, eldest son and heir to the 4th Lord Ribblesdale, and Charlotte Monckton (who died in 1911), daughter of Sir Charles Tennant, Baronet, of The Glen, Peeblesshire. He was gazetted to the 10th Hussars 1 December 1897, and was promoted to Lieutenant 5 November 1899. He served throughout the South African War, at the Battles of Paardeberg, Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek, Vet River, Diamond Hill, Wittebergen and the Relief of Kimberley, and was wounded once during this campaign. He was twice mentioned in Despatches, received both South African War Medals, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "The Honourable Thomas Lister, Lieutenant, 10th Hussars. For services during the operations in South Africa". In 1903 he was selected for special service in Somaliland, serving there as Remount Officer till January 1904, when he was killed whilst carrying Despatches at the Battle of Jidballi, 10 January.
KSA (2) (Capt DSO 10 Hus). Liverpool 1993 £98.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
10th (The Prince of Wales's Own Royal) Hussars
LivesayRobert O'HaraLieutenantLIVESAY, ROBERT O'HARA, Lieutenant, was born 27 June 1876, only son of Colonel R A Livesay, RE. He was gazetted to the Royal West Surrey Regiment 5 September 1896, and became Lieutenant 18 May 1898. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and took part in the Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and actions at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; in the operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900), and action at Pieter's Hill; in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to September 1901, and November 1901 to 31 May 1902; also during the operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in September and October 1901 (Despatches [London Gazette, 17 June 1902]; Queen's Medal with five clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps). He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Robert O'Hara Livesay, Lieutenant, Royal West Surrey Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa. The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC, Transvaal, and presented at Bloemfontein, 4 March 1903. He was promoted to Captain 1 January 1903, and was Officer, Company of Gentleman Cadets, Royal Military College, 1 August 1904 to 31 July 1908; and Adjutant (attached General Staff), Officers' Training Corps, 21 June 1909 to 21 January 1911. Captain Livesay went on retired pay 7 January 1914, joining the Reserve of Officers, his previous full-pay service being from 5 September 1896 to 6 January 1914. He was recalled, and served 1 year and 58 days. Captain Livesav served in the European War, 1914—18; from 5 August 1914 to 12 May 1916, as GSO2, Central Force, Home Defence, 48th Division, BEF; as GSO2, 3rd Army, British Armies in France, 13 May to 12 July 1916; as GSO1, British Armies in France, 13 to 21 July 1916; was Temporary Lieutenant Colonel 13 July 1916 to 2 June 1917; was GSO1, New Zealand Division, British Armies in France, 22 July 1916 to 27 October 1917. He was GSO1, American Staff School, France, 28 October 1917 to 15 March 1918; GSO1, 61st Division, British Armies in France, 16 March to 5 September 1918; Temporary Brigadier General from 6 September 1918, commanding the 24th Infantry Brigade. He was mentioned in Despatches; was given the Brevets of Major, 3 June 1916; Lieutenant Colonel, 3 June 1917, and Colonel, 3 June 1918; and created a CMG in 1919. He was also given the Legion of Honour by the French. In 1917 he married Margaret, only daughter of William Pretyman, of Five Ways, Torquay.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Queen's) Royal West Surrey Regiment
Livingstone-LearmonthFrederick Valiant CottonLieutenantLIVINGSTONE-LEARMONTH, FREDERICK VALIANT COTTON, Lieutenant, was born at Ercildoune, Victoria, 6 June, 1862, third son of Thomas Livingstone-Learmonth, of Park Hall, Stirlingshire, and of Louisa, youngest daughter of General Sir Thomas Valiant, KCB. He was educated at Westminster; obtained his degree, MA, at Pembroke College, Cambridge. At the early age of 21 went out to Australia, and took up squatting pursuits; went to South Africa, to help in the Boer War, with the 2nd Contingent, New South Wales Mounted Rifles, in January 1900; took part in engagements at Osfontein and Driefontein; in the march to Pretoria, under Lieutenant Colonel de Lisle, in General Ian Hamilton's Column; served under de Lisle at Diamond Hill; was in the Transvaal for two months, under Lieutenant Colonel Hickman, and subsequently up to April 1901, served continuously with Lieutenant Colonel de Lisle in his operations in the Orange River Colony and Cape Colony; was twice mentioned in Despatches. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order for his services in the field [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Frederick Valiant Cotton Livingstone-Learmonth, Lieutenant, New South Wales Mounted Rifles. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, forwarded by Lord Kitchener, and presented by the Governor of New South Wales 4 November 1901. During the European War he took up organizing work with the Volunteer Training Corps for Home Defence. He married, in October 1901, Rin, only daughter of the Reverend Canon Carlisle, of Melbourne, and had one son and two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
New South Wales contingent
LlewellynHoelCaptainLLEWELLYN, HOEL, Captain, was born 24 November 1871, son of Colonel Evan Henry Llewellyn, MP. He was educated for the Royal Navy, and as a Midshipman saw active service on the East Coast of Africa, 1888-90 (Despatches). He served as Artillery Officer in the Matabele War, 1893-94 (Despatches); commanding artillery for the Matabele War, 1896-97 (recommended for the VC by the General Commanding). He became Captain, British South Africa Police, and JP, Matabeleland, 1896; served throughout the South African War; commanded armoured trains north of Mafeking, and the artillery of General Plumer; was transferred to the South African Constabulary, 1901; was Commandant, Lichtenburg District, and JP, Transvaal Colony, 1902. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Hoel Llewellyn, Captain, British South Africa Police. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". (The Insignia, etc, sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, 13 July 1901. Presented in South Africa). He served with the Mediterranean Expeditionary Forces, 1914-15 (wounded); was promoted to the rank of Colonel, graded as AAG on the General Headquarters Staff, and appointed Provost-Marshal of Egypt and the British Mediterranean Expeditionary Force. He has been Chief Constable, Wiltshire, in 1908. Colonel Llewellyn married, in 1902, Winifred, youngest daughter of A Berens.
Knight Bachelor, DSO, KPM (GV) (Lt Col DSO, Ch Cons Wiltshire), BSAC Medal for Matabeleland Rhodesia 1896 (Lt, Salisbury Horse), QSA (3) RofM OFS Trans (Capt DSO, SAC), KSA (2) (Capt, DSO SAC), 1914-15 Star (Maj DSO, 2/City of London Yeo), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Lt Col), 1911 Coronation (Police) (Capt DSO, Ch Cons, Wilshire), 1935 Jubilee, 1937 Coronation. Spink 1997 £2,850.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
British South Africa Police
LloydArthur AthelwoldCaptainLLOYD, ARTHUR ATHELWOLD, Captain, was born 26 May 1864, son of Pennant Athelwold Lloyd, of Pentre Hobyn, Mold. He was educated at Wimbledon and Sandhurst, and entered the Army 7 February 1885; was promoted Captain, Northamptonshire Regiment, 1 April 1894; served in South Africa, 1899-1902 (slightly wounded), taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; during operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to November 1900, including action at Venterskroom (7 and 9 August); during operations in Orange River Colony (May and November 1900), including actions at Rhenoster River; afterwards served as Staff Officer to Officer Commanding, Eastern Districts, 30 December 1901 to 29 July 1902. He was mentioned twice in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal and four clasps; the King's Medal and two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Arthur Athelwold Lloyd, Captain, Northamptonshire Regiment. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902. Captain Lloyd retired from the Northamptonshire Regiment in 1905, and became Secretary to the Sussex Territorial Force Association in 1908. He served during the European War, and was awarded the OBE.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Northamptonshire Regiment
LloydLangford NewmanLieutenantLLOYD, LANGFORD NEWMAN, Lieutenant, was born 28 December 1873, son of Colonel E G K P Lloyd. He entered the Army as a Lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps 27 July 1899, and served in South Africa from 1899 to 1901, receiving mention in Despatches twice [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901], and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Langford Lloyd, Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC Troops, Bermuda. Presented by General Geary 12 February 1902. He also received the Queen's Medal with seven clasps. He became Captain 27 July 1902; served as Adjutant of RAMC, Volunteers, November 1905 to March 1908, and Adjutant, Territorial Force, April 1908 to October 1911; became Major 27 July 1911. Serving in the European War, he was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 1 March 1915; was employed as ADMS, 4th Army, France, 15 June to 31 October 1917; ADMS, 11th Division, France, from 1 November 1917, and Temporary Colonel from the same date. He was five times mentioned in Despatches for his war services, and was made a CMG in 1916. Lieutenant Colonel Newman was an MRCS and LRCP. He married Lilian May daughter of Surgeon General Sir W R Hooper, KCSI.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
LockettWilliam JefferyCaptainLOCKETT, WILLIAM JEFFERY, Captain, was born 29 November 1873, second son of Charles Harrison Lockett, of Redcliffe, New Brighton, Cheshire. He entered the 14th Hussars 14 March 1893; became Lieutenant 10 January 1894, and Captain, 1st Dragoon Guards, 4 July 1900. Captain Lockett served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and was present, at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg; actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, including action at Belfast. He was afterwards employed with Imperial Yeomanry 1 January to 2 May 1902, and was Adjutant Imperial Yeomanry, 1 July 1902 to 30 June 1907. For his services in the South African War he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "William Jeffery Lockett, Captain, 5th Lancers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted to Major, 13th Hussars, 8 January 1908, and was transferred to the 11th Hussars 4 December 1909. Major Lockett served in the European War in 1914 and 1915, and was wounded. He was Instructor, Machine Gun Corps Training Centre, 9 August to 3 September 1916; was Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, Machine Gun Corps, 1 October 1916; Deputy Commander, Machine Gun Corps Training Centre, from 19 December 1917, with the temporary rank of Colonel. He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 3 June 1919. Lieutenant Colonel Lockett married, in 1908, Janetta, daughter of Major G Payriter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
5th (Royal Irish) Lancers
LoganEdward TownshendCaptainLOGAN, EDWARD TOWNSHEND, Captain, was born at Valparaiso 6 November 1865, son of Edward Logan, of West Kirby and Chester, and was educated at Westminster. He joined the Army 27 June 1888, and served in the South African War, 1900-2, being present at operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Karee Siding, Vet River (5 to 6 May) and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg. He was employed with the Mounted Infantry. On one occasion Captain Logan conducted a very successful night march, which resulted in the capture of several Boer laagers near Kaffirs' Kraal, and at another time, while his company was acting as escort to an empty convoy, it was heavily attacked by the enemy a few miles out of Klerksdorp, on both flanks and in the rear, but the convoy and men were brought into Klerksdorp in safety with a loss of two men wounded. At another period during the operations (in January 1901) towards Potchefstroom, Captain Logan guarded the bridge at Nauenpoort, and he was commanding the company when in the following month they started out from Elandsfontein with the Scottish Horse to clear the country. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 23 April and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 23 April, 1901]: "Edward T Logan, Captain, 3rd Battalion the Cheshire Regiment. For gallant leading of the advanced guard on the occasion of the capture of Boer guns by Major General Babington's Column. Dated 24 March, 1901". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and were presented by Colonel Sir H S Rawlinson. After peace was restored in the Colony, Captain Logan joined the South African Constabulary. He was a strenuous advocate of universal military training, and was for some years Secretary to the National Service League in Cheshire and North Wales. He was a warm supporter of the Boy Scout movement, and in politics was a staunch Unionist. He married, 22 January 1906, at Rossett, Denbighshire, Hilda Emma Frances, daughter of Charles Carruthers Johnstone, of Chorlton Hall, Cheshire, and widow of Walter Duckworth. Lieutenant Colonel E T Logan served in the European War, and was killed in action in France 25-27 September 1915.
DSO, QSA (3) CC OFS Joh (Capt Cheshire Regt), KSA (2) (Capt DSO Cheshire Regt), BWM, Victory Medal (Lt Col). Spink 1967 £47.10.00
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Cheshire Regiment
LomasCourtneyStaffLOMAS, ERNEST COURTNEY, Staff Surgeon, was born 24 December 1864, son of George Lomas, of Didsbury, Lancashire. He was educated at Owens College, Manchester; MB, ChB, Victoria (MRCS, England, 1888). He became a Surgeon in the Royal Navy 11 February 1891. During the South African War, 1899-1900, he accompanied the Naval Brigade, attached to the Ladysmith Relief Column (Despatches; Medal, two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Ernest Courtney Lomas, MB, Staff Surgeon RN. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Admiralty 12 July 1901, and presented by the King 25 July 1901). Dr Lomas was specially promoted Staff Surgeon 21 October 1900; Fleet Surgeon 21 October 1904; Surgeon Captain 13 September 1918; retired 28 July 1919. He married, in 1901, Eleanor Mary Ruthven, daughter of Robert Howden, of East Lothian. He became a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons (Edinburgh), 1907. Dr Lomas was the Senior Medical Officer in charge of the Hospital Ships Maine and Rohilla when the vessels were totally wrecked in 1914; SMO of the Hospital Ship Garth Castle, 1915, and was created a CB in 1916 for his services during the war; Senior Medical Officer in charge of Royal Naval Hospital, Granton, Edinburgh, 1916-18.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
LongArthurMajorLONG, ARTHUR, Major, was born 26 February 1866, son of James and Elizabeth Long, of Henlow, Bedfordshire. He was educated at the Modern School, Bedford, joining the 1st Battalion Leinster Regiment, from the Militia, 16 November 1887, and being transferred to the Army Service Corps 10 February 1890. He became Lieutenant 16 November 1890, and Captain 1 January 1893; served in the South African War, as DAAG (Special Service), 9 October 1899 to 25 March, 1900, including actions at Elandslaagte, Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop. He served in the defence of Ladysmith, December 1899 to 25 March 1900, including action of 6 January 1900; became Major, Army Service Corps, 1 August 1900; was DAAG, Assistant Director of Supplies, South Africa, 27 March 1900 to 5 March 1902; on the Staff, General Hunter's Division, under General Sir lan Hamilton. He took part in the operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Lydenburg 5 to 8 September. Operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Zilikat's Nek. Operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River, including action at Ruidam. Operations in Cape Colony, December 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was slightly wounded; was mentioned in Despatches (Sir G S White, 2 December 1899, and 23 March 1900) [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Arthur Long, Major, Army Service Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by Major General A Wynne, CB, 19 November 1901. He was Assistant Director of Transport, South Africa, 25 June 1904 to 31 March 1905; was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, Army Service Corps, February 1908; and to Colonel, Army Service Corps, 4 October 1911; District Barrack Officer, Southern Command, 14 July 1913 to 15 October 1913; Assistant Director of Supplies and Transport, Southern Command, 16 October 1913 to 4 August 1914. He served in the European War from 1914; was Deputy Director of Supplies 5 August 1914 to 31 January 1915; Deputy Director of Supplies and Transport 1 February 1915 to 15 January 1916; Temporary Brigadier General from 7 January 1916; Director of Supplies and Transport in Macedonia and the Black Sea from January 1916. He was mentioned in Despatches by Sir A Murray 1 June 1916. He served with the Salonika Forces, Greece, 26 September 1916. He was created a CMG in 1910; a CB in 1917, and a KBE in 1919. Sir Arthur Long was mentioned in Despatches eight times during the war. He married Maud Eleanor, second daughter of the Reverend Canon S Davenport Kelly, of Manchester.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Army Service Corps
LongWalterCaptainLONG, WALTER, Captain, was born 26 July 1879, eldest son of the Right Honourable Walter Long, PC, JP, DL, FRS, LLD, MP, First Lord of the Admiralty, and Lady Doreen, fourth daughter of the 9th Earl of Cork and Orrery. He was educated at Harrow (Moretons, March 1893 to February 1898); was commissioned in the Scots Greys, 20 May 1899, from the Militia; became Lieutenant 10 July 1900, and Captain 23 April 1902. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and was severely wounded after the Relief of Kimberley, having taken part in the famous ride of Sir John French; part of the time he served as ADC to Sir John French. He was present during the operations in the Transvaal, May 1901 to May 1902; on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in September and October 1901, also in Cape Colony in May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 August 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Walter Long, Captain, 2nd Dragoons. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was ADC to Major General Scobell, 1st Cavalry Brigade, Aldershot, 1 April to 30 September 1903, and 1 October 1903 to 31 March 1906; Adjutant, Scots Greys, 11 October 1906 to 1909; ADC to the Governor-General and Commander-in-Chief, Dominion of Canada, 6 October 1911 to 5 October 1913. He was for a time ADC to Sir O'Moore Creagh, Commander-in-Chief in India: specially employed at the War Office 24 April to 31 May 1912; Staff Captain, War Office, 1 June 1912 to 25 January 1915; DAAG 26 January to 13 July 1915; AAG 14 July 1915. He went to France in August 1914, being then Captain in charge of a Squadron, and was shortly afterwards promoted Major (1 April 1915), then Lieutenant Colonel Commanding the 6th Battalion Wiltshire Regiment (from 14 December 1915), and received the CMG. He was several times mentioned in Despatches, and promoted to Brigadier General Commanding 56th Brigade, 19th Division, and made a Brevet Lieutenant Colonel. He was killed in action when in the trenches at Hebuterne on 28 January 1917. His Majesty the King wrote: "The Queen and I are deeply grieved to hear that your son has been killed in action after such a distinguished career, and in the prime of youth. I regret that my Army has lost one of its promising young Generals". HRH the Duke of Connaught wrote: "In Toby the Army and the Scots Greys have lost a splendid officer, who has always set the finest example and whose name will long be remembered. His has been a glorious death, falling in action in command of his Brigade". Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig wrote: "As the General under whom he was directly serving will have told you, his death deprives the Army of one of our best Brigadiers. As a soldier he was so practical, and thoroughly up to his work. I always felt he was sure to attain high rank, and, as a man, he was loved and admired by us all for his manly straightforward ways". At a meeting held in furtherance of the War Loan in the City Town Hall, Mr Walter Long was the chief speaker. "The Colonial Secretary, who had a very sympathetic reception, said it was no secret that an event, which had occurred this week in his domestic circle would in ordinary circumstances have led him to choose seclusion rather than appearance on a public platform; but he felt that it was his duty to come to the meeting in order to spread the lesson that they must all put their backs into the war in order to bring it to a triumphal conclusion. He had this further incentive that his wife and daughter-in-law desired him to come in order to say that their one thought was that the people of this country should not hesitate to do their duty. A still stronger incentive was the knowledge that there had come to him from the son whose loss he should deplore as long as he lived a message, silently given, that nothing should prevent him doing his duty. Until we at home realized the issue of this war, depended on ourselves and on the sacrifices that we were prepared to make, we should not have the determination that was necessary to make our cause triumphant. It was pitiful and almost incredible that at a time like the present men should have to be searched for and dug out in order to obtain their services. It was not because they were not patriotic or ready to serve, but because of the widespread prevalence of the idea that everything that was necessary was being done. Since he had been at the Colonial Office he had been very much struck by the liberality and spontaneity of the contributions from various parts of the Empire where money was none too plentiful. Recently separate contributions of £800, £200 and £20 had been received from three native treasury chests in Northern Nigeria, accompanied by expressions of fervent hope for our victory over Germany. With such examples before us, surely we, who had taken real liberty and real freedom into the countries over which we ruled, would give our last penny in order that the priceless assets might not only remain with us, but might be handed down unimpaired to those who came after. We were profiting by what our forefathers had done. Let us take care that our children should profit by what we were doing to-day. It was the duty of all to give to the Government every penny they could possibly spare, in order that our sailors and soldiers might have the reward they so much desired, namely, the winning of this war speedily. In talking matters over with a dear old friend, he had come to the conclusion that he might help those whom he was addressing to realize what duty really was if he referred to the example of the son whom he had lost. He was a very true Knight, sans peur et sans reproche; he lived his whole life for one thing, and one thing alone—duty—and he died as he had lived. The General Officer Commanding his son's division had written of him: "And now he is gone to join that gallant band to which we have all contributed, and will contribute without fear. They are never far from us out here—the gallant dead—they watch our progress keenly and cheer us by their memory and example". A fine thought for all of us to-day! That as the gallant dead are not gone but are cheering on their comrades to victory, so must they be cheering us on here to still greater effort, not blaming us, not reproaching us, but telling us, in voices to which our ears cannot be deaf, that it is our bounden and sacred duty to do our utmost to help our country in her time of difficulty and trial". Lieutenant Colonel Long was Champion Light Weight Boxer, and twice won the Middle Weight Boxing Championship of the British Army. He married, in 1910, the Honourable Sibell Johnstone, eldest daughter of Lord Derwent and Ethel (who died in 1901), eldest daughter of Captain H Strickland, late of the Life Guards, and they had one son.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys)
LongdenArthur EdmundMajorLONGDEN, ARTHUR EDMUND, Major, was born 27 March 1864. He was gazetted to the Lincolnshire Regiment, 7 February 1885, as Lieutenant; transferred to the North Staffordshire Regiment, on 23 March 1887; took part in the operations in Zululand in 1888; was transferred to the Army Service Corps 15 September 1890. He became Captain 3 April 1892, and subsequently Major. He served in the South African War, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Arthur Edmund Longden, Major, Army Service Corps. In recognition of services in the recent operations in South Africa". Major Longden died 20 April 1901.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Army Service Corps
LongridgeTheodoreCaptainLONGRIDGE, THEODORE, Captain, was born 20 July 1860, son of J A Longridge, of Greve d'Azette, Jersey. He was educated at Eton; entered the 16th Foot 14 January 1880; was Adjutant, Bedfordshire Regiment, 1 July 1881 to 30 April 1892; was promoted Captain 1 February 1889. He served in the Isazai Expedition. Captain Longridge served with the Chitral Relief Force, 1895, and was present at the storming of the Malakand Pass; at the action near Khar and the descent into the Swat Valley. He received the Medal with clasp. He was Adjutant, Militia, 1 October 1896 to 18 August 1898. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as Garrison Adjutant; as Adjutant, 3rd Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers, during the operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria; operations in Orange River Colony; operations in Cape Colony 30 November 1900 to March 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Theodore Longridge, Captain, Bedfordshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC, Transvaal and Orange River Colony, and were presented at Bloemfontein in January 1903. He became Major 11 January 1902; was Staff Officer, Transvaal and Orange River Colony, 1 December 1902 to 11 March 1903; became Lieutenant Colonel 2 May 1908, and retired from the Bedfordshire Regiment 2 May 1912, joining the Reserve of Officers; served during the European War from 1914, as Commandant at Headquarters. He married, in 1893, Emma Harriet Elizabeth, daughter of T E Fowle, of Chute Lodge, Hants, JP, DL.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bedfordshire Regiment
LovatLord Simon JosephMajorLOVAT, LORD (SIMON JOSEPH), Major, was born 25 November 1871, son of the 5th Baron, and Alice, daughter of T Weld Blundell, of Ince Blundell Hall, near Liverpool. He was educated at Fort Augustus Abbey, and at Oxford; succeeded his father in 1887; became Lieutenant, 1st Life Guards, and Captain, 1st Volunteer Battalion Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, being promoted to Major 13 December 1899; became temporary Captain in the Army 21 February 1900; raised and served with Lovat's Scouts in the South African War of 1899-1902; commanded Lovat's Scouts from the 20 September 1901 to 31 May 1902; in command mobile force from November 1901 to May 1902; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; operations in the Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions in the Wittebergen (1 to 29 July) and on Caledon River 27 to 29 November; operations in Cape Colony, north and south of Orange River, 1899-1900; operations in Cape Colony, Orange River Colony and the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902 (Despatches [London Gazette, 18 February and 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; Queen's Medal with two clasps; King's Medal with two clasps; created a CB, and a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Simon Joseph, Lord Lovat, Major, 1st Volunteer Battalion Cameron Highlanders. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Lieutenant Colonel, Lovat's Scouts, 30 March 1903; was created a CVO, 1903; became Colonel 9 November 1908; created a KCVO in 1908. On his return from South Africa Lord Lovat formed two Yeomanry Regiments, which formed part of the Highland Mounted Brigade. Major General Lord Lovat was created a Knight of the Thistle in 1914. He commanded the Highland Mounted Brigade in Gallipoli, 1915; IVth Mounted Division on East Coast of England, 1916; Lovat Scouts observers in France, 1916-17; was appointed Director of Forestry, BEF, April, 1917. He was a landlord who owned about 181,800 acres. He married, in 1910, the Honourable Laura Lister, second daughter of the 4th Baron Ribblesdale and Charlotte Monckton (who died in 1911), daughter of Sir Charles Tennant, 1st Baronet, and they had one son, Simon Christopher, Master of Lovat, born 9 July 1911, and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Queen's Own) Cameron Highlanders
LoweArthur CecilLieutenantLOWE, ARTHUR CECIL, Lieutenant, was born in 1868, son of Henry William Lowe, of Oakhill, Walton-on-Thames. He served in the South African War, with a Field Battery of the City of London Imperial Volunteers, taking part in operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, August and September 1900; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, August and September 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, including actions at Lindley (26 June), Bethlehem (6 and 7 July) and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Arthur Cecil Lowe, Lieutenant, Honourable Artillery Company. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He subsequently became Captain in the Honourable Artillery Company, and Major, and then Lieutenant Colonel, Territorial Force. He was created a CMG, and was killed in action 24 November 1917. An obituary notice says: "Brigadier General Arthur Cecil Lowe, DSO, RA, was killed on 24 November. Born in 1868, he was the son of Mr Henry William Lowe, of Oakhill, Walton-on-Thames. Formerly he was Major in the 2nd City of London Horse Artillery, Military member of the City of London Territorial Force Association, and Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, 2nd London Brigade, RFA. He served with the City Imperial Volunteers in the South African War, and was mentioned in Despatches and awarded the DSO. He married, in 1910, Amy Louisa, second daughter of W alter Samuel Partridge, of Tunbridge Wells".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
LowtherHenry CecilCaptainLOWTHER, HENRY CECIL, Captain, was born 27 January 1869, youngest son of Honourable William Lowther. He entered the Scots Guards 20 December 1888; became Lieutenant 13 April 1892; was Adjutant, Scots Guards, 17 February 1896 to 19 July 1901, and Captain 24 June 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as Adjutant, 1st Battalion Scots Guards (December 1900 to July 1901), and afterwards on the Staff. He was present in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont. Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action of Belfast (26 and 27 August); operations in the Transvaal, December 1900 to March 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, March to May 1902; operations in Cape Colony in December 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901 and 29 July 1902]; was placed on the list of officers considered qualified for Staff employment in consequence of service on the Staff in the Field; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Henry Cecil Lowther, Captain, Scots Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. Captain Lowther was Brigade Major, 1st Brigade, 1st Army Corps, 3 December 1902 to 8 October 1903; Staff Captain (Intelligence), HQ of Army, 9 October 1903 to 29 September 1905; was promoted to Major 12 March 1904; was Military Attache, Paris, Madrid and Lisbon 30 September 1905 to 30 September 1909; was created a CMG in 1911; was Military Secretary to HRH the Governor-General, Canada, 6 October 1911 to 8 October 1913; was created a CVO in 1913; became Lieutenant Colonel 9 October 1913. He served in the European War from 1914, in command of the 1st Scots Guards, and then of the 1st Guards Brigade, BEF, 13 September 1914 to 22 August 1915; as Military Secretary, BEF, 6 September to 18 December 1915; as Brigadier General, General Staff, Home Forces, 19 December 1915 to 15 March, 1919. He became Colonel 9 October 1917, and was Temporary Major General from 4 October 1917, to 15 March 1919. He was three times mentioned in Despatches; wounded at Troyon; created a CB in 1915, and a KCMG in 1918; was given the Brevet of Colonel 18 February 1915. Sir Henry Lowther received the Swedish Order of the Sword; Commander of the Legion of Honour, and the Spanish Order of Military Merit. He was M'P (Unionist), Northern Division of Westmorland, 1915-18. He wrote 'From Pillar to Post'.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Scots Guards
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