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 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
ManceHarry OsborneLieutenantMANCE, HARRY OSBORNE, Lieutenant, was born 2 October 1875, at Karachi, India, son of Sir Henry Christopher Mance, Kt, CIE, LLD (the inventor of the heliograph), and Annie, daughter of John Sayer, of Yatton. He was educated at Bedford Grammar School and the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich; was gazetted Second Lieutenant, Royal Engineers, 15 March 1895. He became Lieutenant 15 March 1898, and served through the South African War, 1899-1901, as Staff Officer to the Assistant Director of Railways, and afterwards as Deputy Assistant Director of Railways, and DADR of Armoured Trains, Kimberley Line, from 1 January 1900 to 30 September 1902, taking part in the operations in Cape Colony, north of the Orange River, in 1899. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's South African Medal and clasp for Belmont; the King's South African Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Harry Osborne Mance, Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Captain 1 April 1904. From 4 July 1908 to 9 January 1912, Captain Mance was employed in Northern Nigeria on the construction of the Baro-Kano Railway. Captain Mance was Staff Captain at the War Office 2 December 1912 to 23 January 1915, and became Major 30 October 1914. He was DA Director, War Office (temporary) 29 January to 22 April 1915; given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 April 1915; Assistant Director of Railway Transport, War Office (temporary), 23 April 1915 (Temporary Brigadier General from 14 August 1916) and Director of Railways, Light Railways and Roads, War Office, and Temporary Brigadier General from 26 September 1916. He was created a CMG in 1917, and CB in 1918, and was mentioned in Despatches in 1917 and 1918 for distinguished services at the War Office. He acted as Transportation Adviser to the British Delegation at the Peace Conference, and as one of the British Delegates on the Ports, Waterways and Railways Commission, and on the commission for the revision of the treaties of 1839, and has also been President of the Communications Section of the Supreme Economic Council. He was Revolver Champion of the Army in 1914. He married, at St Albans, 2 November 1911, Elizabeth Hope, youngest daughter of Major General W Stenhouse, Indian Army, and their children were: Henry Stenhouse Mance, born 5 February 1913; Herbert William, born 15 June 1919, and Mary Hope Jeanne, born 20 August 1916.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
ManglesRoland HenryCaptainMANGLES, ROLAND HENRY, Captain, was born 9 February 1874, son of Ross L Mangles, VC (Bengal Civil Service), and of Henrietta Anne Mangles, daughter of James More-Molyneux, of Lesley Park, Guildford. He was educated at Marlborough; joined the Royal West Surrey Regiment 12 December 1894, becoming Lieutenant 21 November 1896; was employed with the West African Frontier Force 5 March 1898 to 15 October 1899, and took part in operations on the Niger River and served in Borgu (Despatches; Medal with clasp). He was promoted to Captain 20 February 1902. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902 (as Brigade Signalling Officer 24 August 1900 to 30 June 1902), and took part in the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February, and action at Vaal Kranz: operations on Tugela Heights and action at Pieter's Hill; subsequently in the operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek, and finally on the Staff as a Brigade Signalling Officer, and took part in operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony. He was wounded in the attack on Monte Cristo; was mentioned in Despatches, and awarded the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Roland Henry Mangles, Captain, The Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was specially employed at the War Office 21 March to 20 June 1910; GS03, War Office, 15 October 1910 to 8 March 1912; Brigade Major, 16th Brigade, Irish Command, 9 March 1912 to 4 August 1914. He served in the European War, 1914-18, as Brigade Major, 16th Infantry Brigade, BEF, 5 August 1914 to 19 February 1915; GSO2, 20th Division, New Armies, BEF, 1 March 1915 to 8 February 1916; GSO1, 1st Grade, 34th Division, BEF, British Armies in France, 9 February 1916 to 18 February 1917; GSO1, War Office, 19 February to 5 November 1917; GSO1, 58th Division, British Armies in France, 16 July 1918; Brigadier General, General Staff, 5th Army Corps, British Armies in France, from 16 July 1918; Brigadier General, General Staff, 20th Army Corps, Egypt, from 18 May 1919. He was mentioned in Despatches, (February 1915; January and June 1916; January and June 1917; June 1918: January and June 1919); awarded the Brevets of Major, Lieutenant Colonel and Colonel, and was awarded the CMG and Order of St Ann with Cross Swords. Captain Mangles married, in December 1909, Sylvia Amy Rhys, daughter of Reverend W Hand, and they had two sons: Ross Patrick and David Ross, born 19 March 1912, and 22 October 1916, respectively.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Queen's) Royal West Surrey Regiment
ManglesWalter JamesCaptainMANGLES, WALTER JAMES, Captain, was born 13 September 1862, eldest son of Ross Mangles, VC. He entered the Army 12 November 1884; became Major 26 June 1902. He served during the South African War, 1899-1902; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; during operations 5 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; during operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900) and action at Pieter's Hill; taking part in the operations in the Transvaal, May and June 1900; operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek; during operations in Orange River Colony, June 1900, also in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Walter James Mangles, Captain, Royal Lancaster Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested with the Insignia of the Distinguished Service Order by the King 18 December 1902. Major Mangles retired 7 January 1903.
DSO, QSA (5) T-H OFS RofL Trans L-N (Capt), KSA (2) (Major DSO). Dixon 1986 £685.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Royal Lancaster Regiment
MannersLord Robert William OrlandoCaptainMANNERS, LORD ROBERT WILLIAM ORLANDO, Captain, was born 4 February 1870, fourth son of the 7th Duke of Rutland and of the Duchess of Rutland, and half-brother of the 8th Duke. He was educated at Wellington College, and gazetted to the King's Royal Rifles 4 February 1891, serving in the Isazai Expedition in 1892. During the South African War, 1899-1902, he took part in the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso; was present at the actions of Spion Kop and Vaal Kranz, in the operations on Tugela Heights, and in the action at Pieter's Hill. During the Natal operations he was in the action of Laing's Nek, 1900, and in the Transvaal he fought in the actions of Belfast and Lydenberg. For these services he was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and for his services with the Natal Bearer Company he was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Lord Robert William Orlando Manners, Captain, King's Royal Rifles. In recognition of services during the War in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to the Commander-in-Chief, South Africa, and presented by Colonel T E Hickman, CB, DSO. He attained to the substantive rank of Major in 1908, and retired to the Reserve of Officers in 1910, having previously served for some years as Adjutant of the 22nd RVC (Central London Rangers), 1903-9. A keen sportsman and a good rider to hounds, he accepted the joint mastership of the Belvoir Hounds, his partner in the mastership being Major T Bourke, and they hunted the country successfully until the outbreak of the European War, when both returned to active service. An officer of great experience in South African fighting, Lord Robert Manners was gazetted a Brigade Major in October 1914, and in July 1916, was given the command of a service battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers. For his services on the Somme, August-September 1916, he was created a CMG, 1916. The Northumberland troops had been actively engaged with the enemy at Villeret, north-east of St Quentin, and had succeeded in pushing them back about three-quarters of a mile, when Lord Robert fell in action, 11 September 1917, a week after Sir Douglas Haig's communique specially mentioning the splendid services rendered by the Northumberland Fusiliers. Lord Robert married, in 1902, Mildred Mary, daughter of the Reverend Charles Buckworth and widow of Major H E Buchanan Riddell, and there was one daughter, Elizabeth.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Royal Rifle Corps
ManselGeorge ClavellMajorMANSEL, GEORGE CLAVELL, Major, was born 9 February 1861, youngest son of Lieutenant Colonel George Pleydell Mansel, of Smedmore, Dorset, and of Jemima Henrietta, daughter of William Gambier, and Henrietta, Countess of Athlone. He was educated at Eton and Sandhurst, and was gazetted to the 68th Foot, as Second Lieutenant, 11 August 1880, and became Lieutenant 1 July 1881, and Captain 1 April 1889. He was promoted Major on 9 August 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso, and in the operations of 17 to 24 January 1900; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900); actions at Pieter's Hill; operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June). Operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches by Sir R H Buller, 30 March and 9 November 1900 (London Gazette, 3 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps; King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "George Clavell Mansel, Major, Durham Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". He became Lieutenant Colonel 29 February 1904; was given the Brevet of Colonel 1 March 1907; retired 13 June 1908, with the rank of Colonel, having served the whole of his service (28 years) in one battalion of the Durham Light Infantry. He died 12 July 1910, and an obituary notice of him appeared in the ‘The Times'.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Durham Light Infantry
MantellPatrick RinersMajorMANTELL, PATRICK RINERS, Major, was born 28 December 1862, son of Lieutenant Colonel Mantell, late IMS. He was gazetted to the Leinster Regiment as Lieutenant 30 August 1883; became Lieutenant, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, 20 October 1883; served in the Burmese Expedition, 1885-87 (Medal with clasp), and in the Hazara Expedition, 1891. He was promoted to Captain 13 July 1892, and to Major, 6 October 1900. From 1899 to 1902 Major Mantell served in the South African War, being present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso; operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900) and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, including actions at Frederickstad (17 to 25 October); operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River, including action at Ruidam; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to September 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, September 1901 to May 1902. He was Garrison Adjutant at Potchefstroom and Commandant at Frederickstad, and was slightly wounded; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Patrick Riners Mantell, Major, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 28 March 1903. He became Lieutenant Colonel 21 August 1907, and Colonel 30 August 1911, and retired 5 June 1912. Colonel Mantell married, in 1904, Helen Campbell, daughter of Colonel G Campbell Ross.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Welsh Fusiliers
MardenArthur WilliamCaptainMARDEN, ARTHUR WILLIAM, Brevet Major, was born 21 September 1868, son of Thomas Marden, of Weston Priory, Bath. He was gazetted to the Manchester Regiment 11 February 1888; became Lieutenant 31 July 1889; was Adjutant, Manchester Regiment, 18 April 1896 to 1 November 1896, and was promoted to Captain 6 October 1896. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as Adjutant, 1st Battalion Manchester Regiment (21 October 1899 to 1 March 1900, and 14 May to 29 November 1900); took part in the operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Elandslaagte and Lombard's Kop; Defence of Ladysmith, including action of 6 January 1900 (slightly wounded); again in Natal (March to June 1900); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Belfast (26 and 27 August), and again during operations in the Transvaal, 1901, as Staff Officer to Brigadier General. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901 (Sir G S White, 2 December 1899, and 23 March 1900), and London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; was given the Brevet of Major 1 June 1902; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Arthur William Marden, Captain and Brevet Major, Manchester Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Major 29 November 1900, retiring from the Manchester Regiment 22 April 1911. He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel, and was promoted to Colonel in the Army 19 October 1917. Colonel Marden married, in 1903, Laura Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph Deakin, of Ellerhow, Grange-over-Sands.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Manchester Regiment
MarjoribanksDudley ChurchillLieutenantMARJORIBANKS, THE HON DUDLEY CHURCHILL (LORD TWEEDMOUTH), Lieutenant, was born 2 March 1874, only son of the 2nd Baron Tweedmouth and Lady F O L Spencer Churchill, daughter of the 7th Duke of Marlborough. He was educated at Harrow; joined the Royal Horse Guards 3 July 1895, and became Lieutenant 13 January 1897, and served with a composite regiment of Household Cavalry in South Africa, 1899-1902; was present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, in 1900, including actions at Elands River (4 to 16 August); operations in Orange River Colony, May to November 1900, including actions at Bethlehem (6 and 7 July) and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including actions at Colesberg (1 January to 12 February). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "The Honourable Dudley Churchill Marjoribanks, Lieutenant, Royal Horse Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King. He was promoted to Captain 25 March 1904; was Military Secretary to the High Commissioner in South Africa 29 April 1905 to 31 March 1908; was given the Brevet of Major 12 August 1908; was DAA and QMG, West Lancashire Division, Western Command, 9 April 1908 to 31 March 1910. On the death of his father in 1909, he became the 3rd Baron Tweedmouth. Lord Tweedmouth served in the European War in 1914 and 1915; was Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Horse Guards, 7 December 1914 to 6 November 1918; served with the Guards' Machine Gun Regt, 10 May 1918 to 4 March 1919; was Temporary Lieutenant Colonel 10 May to 6 November 1918; was Lieutenant Colonel, Household Cavalry, from 7 November 1918. He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 31 January 1915, and created a CMG, 1915. He was Lord-in-Waiting to HM the King. Lord Tweedmouth married, in 1901, Muriel, eldest daughter of the 9th Viscount Midleton, and of Lady Hilda Charteris (who died in 1901), daughter of the 9th Earl of Wemyss, and they had two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Horse Guards
MarkerRaymond JohnCaptainMARKER, RAYMOND JOHN, Captain, was the son of Richard Marker, JP, of Combe, Honiton, and the Honourable Venetia Alexandrina (nee Digby), eldest daughter of Edward, 9th Baron Digby. He was born at Upcerne Manor, Dorchester, 18 April 1867; was educated at Evelyn's Preparatory School, Eton, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and was gazetted Second Lieutenant, Coldstream Guards, 15 November 1888, becoming Lieutenant 29 September 1890. From 1892 to 1896 he was Adjutant of the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, and from 1896 to 1897 ADC to Sir J West Ridgeway, Governor and Commander-in-Chief in Ceylon, and from 1899 to 1900 ADC to Lord Curzon, Viceroy of India. He was on Special Service in South Africa 7 April 1900 to 8 March 1901, and ADC to Lord Kitchener, Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in South Africa, 9 March 1901 to September 1902. He served throughout, the campaign, taking part in the operations in the Orange Free State, April to May 1900, including actions at Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal, May to June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill. Operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to August 1900, including the action at Belfast; operations in Orange River Colony, September to 29 November 1900, and 30 November to December 1900. Operations in Cape Colony, December 1900 to March 1901, and operations in the Transvaal, March 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was three times mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 23 April, 7 May and 10 September 1901]; was given the Brevet of Major 26 June 1902; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps; was placed on the list of officers considered qualified for Staff employment in consequence of services on the Staff in the Field, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 23 April 1901]: "Raymond John Marker, Captain, Coldstream Guards. For the capture of De Wet's gun and pom-pom in Cape Colony. Dated 23 April 1901". The Insignia were presented to him by the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 August 1901. Captain Marker and the then Colonel Hubert Hamilton brought home Peace Despatches to the King at Windsor in June 1902. He accompanied Lord Kitchener to India as ADC (28 November 1902 to 30 April 1904]; became Major 29 November 1903, and in 1904 proceeded to the Staff College, qualifying in the following year. For part of 1905 he was Private Secretary to Mr Arnold Forster, Secretary of State for War, and he was later appointed ADC to the Commander-in-Chief in India (5 November 1905 to 27 October 1906). From 1 April 1908 to 12 June 1910, he was GSO2, Home Counties Division, Eastern Command; became Lieutenant Colonel 11 March 1911, and from March 1912 to November 1913, was in command of the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards. He was AQMG, Aldershot Command, 29 November 1913 to August 1914; was promoted to Colonel 5 August 1914, and accompanied the British Expeditionary Force to France as AA and QMG, 1st Army Corps; served through the Retreat from Mons, the battles of the Aisne and the Marne; was twice mentioned in Sir John French's Despatches [London Gazette, 19 October 1914, and 17 February 1915], and was made an Officer of the Legion of Honour for his services during the retirement from Mons. Colonel Marker was hit by a shell on the 4th November 1914, outside the reporting centre of the 1st Army Corps at Ypres, and died of his wounds at Boulogne on the 13th of the same month. He was buried at Gittisham, Honiton. He had married, on 21 November 1906, at the Guards' Chapel, Wellington Barracks, Beatrice Minnie Shrieve, third daughter of Sir Thomas Jackson, Baronet, and Amelia Lydia Dare, and they had one son, Richard Raymond Kitchener, born 18 June 1908.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Coldstream Guards
MarksClaud LaurieCaptainMARKS, CLAUD LAURIE, Captain, was born 11 December 1863, son of Reverend P W Marks. He served in South Africa in 1880,1881,1884,1889 and 1900; He served in the Sekukuni War with Ferreira's Horse, and also took part in the Basuto War with Dyme's Rifles and the Warren Expedition of 1884 with Carrington's Guides. He assisted in organising a company of the East Kent Yeomanry and commanded it in South Africa, being twice mentioned in despatches, received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Claud Laurie Marks, Captain, 14th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He became Honorary Captain, 4th Battalion Highland Light Infantry. Major Marks married, in 1887, Caroline, daughter of A Hoffnung, and they had two sons. He died 1 April 1910, and an obituary notice of him appeared in the 'Times' of 2 April 1910.
DSO, QSA (2) CC Witt (Capt 53rd Co IY). Back of the QSA clasps replaced. This his sole medal entitlement. Liverpool Medals Dec 05 £3,000.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
14th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
MarriottJohnCaptainMARRIOTT, JOHN, Captain, was born 3 November 1861, son of John Marriott, of Stowmarket, Advocate General, Bombay. He joined the Norfolk Regiment 5 December 1883; was promoted Captain 5 September 1890. He was captured by brigands in Asia Minor in October 1896, who demanded a ransom of £16,000, but was released by Turkish troops. He served in the South African War, 1900-2; being present at operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Karee Siding, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of tie Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "John Marriott, Captain, Norfolk Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to the GOC, Transvaal and Orange River Colony, 15 November 1902 and presented by Brigadier General Munro at Potchefstroom 11 January 1903. He was promoted Major 12 March 1904, and was specially employed on the Military Survey and Reconnaissance of Manaqualand and Bechuanaland, South Africa, 1907. He became Lieutenant Colonel 12 January 1909; was created an MVO in 1909, and promoted Colonel 30 October 1912. He was Brigade Commander, Surrey Infantry Brigade, from 1913, and during the European War he commanded the following brigades: The Surrey, 2/1st Surrey, 112th, in France, 200th and 221st Mixed Brigade. He was specially mentioned for valuable services in connection with the War in 1918; was created a CBE in 1919, and retired from the Staff with the honorary rank of Brigadier General 11 April 1919. General Marriott was a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and of the Royal Zoological Society, and was an authority on big game. He married, in 1902, Cordelia C Nevers, of St Johnsburg, Vermont, USA, and they had three daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Norfolk Regiment
MarriottRichard George ArmineCaptainMARRIOTT, RICHARD GEORGE ARMINE, Captain, was born 26 January 1867, son of Humphrey R G Marriott, of Abbot's Hall, Shalford, Essex, and of Edith Alice Smyth, youngest daughter of Thomas White, JP, DL, of Wethersfield, Essex, and of Colchester. He was educated at Harrow; was gazetted to the Buffs 4 May 1887; was promoted Lieutenant 1 April 1890; and Captain 25 June 1896. He served in South Africa, 1899-1902; was present at the Relief of Kimberley, and at operations in the Orange Free State in February and May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 23 February) (severely wounded); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900. He was Commandant at Pienaar's Poort; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. Captain Marriott was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Richard George Armine Marriott, Captain, East Kent Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 18 December 1902; the Warrant sent 17 January 1903. He was promoted Major 26 August 1906; retired and entered the Reserve of Officers 28 August 1907. He was a JP for Essex. Major Marriott married, in 1912, Eileen Anita, eldest daughter of Brigadier General Robert Albert Hickson, CB, late of The Buffs, and of Ballytaggart, County Kerry, and of his wife, Annette Emilie, youngest daughter of T W Younghusband, of Bamburgh, Northumberland, and they had three daughters and one son.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Buffs) East Kent Regiment
MarsdenGeorgeLieutenantMARSDEN, GEORGE, Lieutenant, was born 9 February 1874, son of Captain Richard Marsden, RNR, JP. He was educated at St Paul's School, and joined the 3rd West Yorkshire Regiment; passed the School of Instruction, Chelsea; resigned his commission. He joined the Perth (Western Australian) Artillery; was employed on a special mission to inquire into the condition of the aborigines of Western Australia, 1896-97. He was appointed ADC to the Governor of Western Australia (Sir Gerard Smith, KCMG); resigned in 1899, and in the same year joined the South African Light Horse. He served in the South African War of 1899-1902; was mentioned in Despatches three times, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "George Marsden, Lieutenant, South African Light Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa and presented in South Africa. He later joined the 4th Battalion The Cheshire Regiment. Captain Marsden married, in 1904, Julia, daughter of George Booker, and they had one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South African Light Horse
MarshCunliffe HebbertLieutenantMARSH, CUNLIFFE HEBBERT, Lieutenant, was born 30 October 1878, son of Colonel Hippisley Cunliffe Marsh, late Indian Staff Corps, and of Emma Brett, second daughter of Colonel W G Hebbert, RE. He was educated at Repton; joined the 1st South Lancashire Regiment (from the Militia), as Second Lieutenant, 20 May 1899; became Lieutenant 8 August 1900; served in South Africa, 1899-1901; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; during operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; taking part during operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 1900 (he was wounded 23 February), and action at Pieter's Hill; during operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); during operations in Orange River Colony, June 1900; taking part in the operations in the Transvaal, July to 29 November 1900. He served during operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to August 1901; in the operations in Cape Colony, August to September 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901], and received the Queen's Medal with seven clasps; was recommended for the Victoria Cross for services at Pieter's Hill, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Cunliffe Hebbert Marsh, Lieutenant, South Lancashire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent to South Africa, and presented at Nowgong, 28 October 1903. He was transferred to the Indian Army, as Lieutenant in the 18th King George's Own Lancers 6 September 1902; became Captain in the Indian Army 20 May 1908. Captain Marsh proceeded to France with the Indian Cavalry in November 1914. He was promoted Major 1 September 1915. In November 1915, he was appointed Second-in-Command of a Service Battalion King's Own Scottish Borderers, and shortly afterwards Lieutenant Colonel (temporary), commanding the 7th Battalion of Cameron Highlanders (mentioned in Despatches, January 1917). He was recalled to India 9 June 1918 to command a battalion, Indian Infantry, and was appointed to the 2/10th Jats. He married, in 1909, Nina Helen, eldest daughter of George James Smith, of Row, Dumbartonshire, and they had two daughters: Helen Barbara, born 15 August 1910, and Sylvia Mary, born 25 February 1913.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince of Wales's Volunteers) South Lancashire Re
MartonRichard OliverCaptainMARTON, RICHARD OLIVER, Captain, was born 19 August 1872, son of Colonel George Blucher Heneage Marion, JP, DL, and the Honourable Caroline Gertrude, daughter of the 5th Viscount Ashbrook. He was gazetted to the Royal Artillery 23 November 1891, becoming Lieutenant 23 November 1894, and Captain in December 1899. He served in the South African War on Special Service 3 January 1900 to 19 January 1900; employed with Transport 20 January 1900 to 10 July 1900, and was present at operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal, May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria, and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, including action at Reit Vlei; operations in the Transvaal, May to September 1901; operations on the Zululand frontier of Natal, September and October 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, December 1901 to 21 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Richard Oliver Marton, Captain, Royal Garrison Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 29 October 1901. Captain Marton was 4th Assistant Superintendent of Experiments, School of Gunnery, 20 June 1902 to 31 January 1903; 3rd Assistant Superintendent of Experiments, School of Gunnery, 1 February 1903 to 11 May 1905; 2nd Assistant Superintendent of Experiments, School of Gunnery, 12 May 1905 to 31 May 1905; 1st Assistant Superintendent of Experiments, Experimental Staff, 1 June 1905 to 31 December 1905; Instructor, School of Gunnery, 1 April 1910 to 31 March 1913. He was promoted to Major 29 May 1912; was Major-Instructor, School of Gunnery, 1 April 1913 to 31 March 1914; became Lieutenant Colonel 1 May 1917; Superintendent of Experiments, School of Instruction for RH and RFA, Chapperton Down Artillery School, 10 November 1917. Lieutenant Colonel Marton served in the European War, and was created a CMG in 1916. He married, in 1899, Margaret Isabel, daughter of Egerton Leigh, of Jodrel Hall, Cheshire, and they had two sons.
CMG, DSO, QSA (4) CC OFS Joh D-H (Capt 15 Coy SD RFA), KSA (2) (Capt DSO), 1914 Star and Bar (Maj DSO RGA), BWM, Victory Medal with MID. Lusted 1981 £675. Hall 1986 £785. March 1988 (DSO, QSA/KSA) £450.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Garrison Artillery
MasonJames CooperLieutenantMASON, JAMES COOPER, Lieutenant, was born in Toronto in 1875, eldest son of Brigadier General the Honourable James Mason, Senator. He was educated at Toronto Collegiate Institute, and served as Lieutenant and Captain, Royal Canadian Regiment, in South Africa from 1899 to 1900, being present in operations in the Orange Free State, including operations at Paardeberg (18 February), during which he was slightly wounded; operations in Orange River Colony and Transvaal, west of Pretoria, August 1900; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; was given the Brevet of Major, the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "James Cooper Mason, Lieutenant, Canadian Contingent. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Major 1 February 1902; was appointed Brigade Major of the 8th Canadian Infantry Brigade 9 December 1909, and became Lieutenant Colonel and Commanding Officer of his regiment, the 10th Royal Grenadiers Militia of Canada, 21 July 1915. Lieutenant Colonel Mason was a Banker. He married, in 1904, Jean Florence, daughter of Alexander MacArthur.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Canada contingent
MassieJohn HamonCaptainMASSIE, JOHN HAMON, Captain, was born at Eaux Chaudes, Basses Pyrenees, France, 10 June 1872, younger son of Edward Richard Massie, of Coddington, Cheshire, and Annefield, Gresford, North Wales, formerly Lieutenant, 78th Highlanders, and his first wife, Baroness Olga Marie, daughter of Baron von Wessenberg-Ampringen, formerly Austrian Ambassador at St James's. John Hamon Massie's paternal grandfather was Admiral Thomas Leche Massie, RN. He was educated at Mr Montagu Foster's School, Stubbington, Fareham, and at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, being gazetted to the Royal Artillery as Second Lieutenant 1 May 1892, and became Lieutenant in May 1895. He served in the Chitral Campaign in 1895, with the Relief Force, and received the Medal and clasp. In 1898 he passed the long course at Shoeburyness with first-class honours. He was promoted to Captain 19 January 1900, and served in the South African War, 1900-2, in which, after landing at Cape Town, in January 1900, he acted as Transport Officer with the 30th Remount Company, Army Service Corps, being graded as Deputy Assistant Adjutant-General. He was present at several actions and operations near De Wet's Dorp, the march to Pretoria and action at Zand River in May 1900. He entered Pretoria with Lord Roberts on the 5th of June 1900; took part in the actions at Diamond Hill and Heidelberg, and in the pursuit of De Wet from Bethlehem to the Transvaal; actions at Vredefort, and operations at Hekpoort Valley. He was then temporarily in command of a pom-pom section. In November 1900, he was in the action near Schwartz Kopje. In January 1902, he was appointed Staff Officer for Transport, a position which he held under various Generals Commanding, and he returned to England in January 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches by Lord Kitchener. The following is the record of his services in South Africa as given in 'Hart's Army List': "Captain J H Massie, RA, served in the South African War, 1900-2; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Diamond Hill; in the Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Wittebergen; in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to March 1902, and again in Orange River Colony, March to 31 May 1902, as Special Service Officer; afterwards on Staff. Despatches [London Gazette, 17 January 1902]; Queen's Medal with four clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps. DSO". He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "John Hamon Massie, Captain, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 18 December 1902. The clasps to the Queen's Medal were given to Captain Massie for Cape Colony, Johannesburg, Wittebergen and Diamond Hill respectively. He was Instructor at the Royal Military Academy from 1 January to 11 September 1904; Commander of a Company of Gentleman Cadets there from 12 September 1904 to 31 December 1908, and Staff Captain, School of Gunnery, Shoeburyness, November 1910 to August 1914. He was promoted to Major 15 February 1913. In the Great War he proceeded to France on the 24th August 1914, for a week, to Havre, on Special Duty as Staff Officer to Brigadier General Nicolls, RA On 1 September 1914, he was gazetted as Staff Captain, Administrative Staff, and again went to Havre for duty with Heavy Artillery on the 9th November. He was kept at the base, St Nazaire, till 1 November, when he left there to take command of the 26th Heavy Battery (sixty-pounders) at Ypres. On the 13th November 1914, he was mortally wounded at Ypres, by a fragment of high explosive shell, while in command of the 26th Battery, and died in the Field Hospital on the 16th of that month. He was buried in Ypres Cemetery. Major Massie liked all games, and was good at most. He several times represented his regiment at billiards against the Royal Engineers, and he was for over three years Secretary and Treasurer of the Royal Artillery Games Fund. He married, at Southsea, on 3 September 1903, Maria Margaret, elder daughter of Major General Ernest Archibald Berger, late 10th (The Lincolnshire) Regiment.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
MatchamWilliam EyreCaptainMATCHAM, WILLIAM EYRE, Captain, was born 16 May 1865, second son of William Eyre Eyre-Matcham, of New House. He entered the Army 6 May 1885; was promoted Captain 11 July 1894; served in South Africa, 1900-2, with the Prince of Wales's Light Horse; during the operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, August to November 1900; in the operations in Orange River Colony, including actions at Bethlehem and Wittebergen; taking part in the operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900, including actions at Colesberg (25 January to 12 February). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette 27 September 1901]: "William Eyre Matcham, Captain, Wiltshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 18 December 1902, and the Warrant sent 14 January 1903. He was appointed Deputy Assistant Director of Remounts, and was Captain of the Reserve of Officers. He retired 10 May 1905. Major Matcham served during the European War, 1914 to 1917; became Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, 1916, and received the Brevet of Major 1 January 1917. He married, in 1903, Edith Evelyn, youngest daughter of N J Betterton.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Duke of Edinburgh's) Wiltshire Regiment
MathiasGeorge MontaguLieutenantMATHIAS, GEORGE MONTAGUE, Lieutenant, was born in November 1865, son of George Mathias. He served in Matabeleland in 1896 (Despatches; Medal), and in the South African War of 1899-1902. He was twice mentioned in Despatches for his services in the Boer War; received the Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "G Mathias, Lieutenant, Imperial Light Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa”. The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the Colonial Office, and presented at Johannesburg 7 June 1903. He married, in 1895, Elsie, daughter of the Honourable P Norton.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Light Horse
MatthewsFrank BroadwoodMajorMATTHEWS, FRANK BROADWOOD, Major, was born at Romford, Essex, 7 September 1857, son of Charles Peter Matthews, of The Bower, Havering-atte-Bower, Essex, and 23 Hertford Street, Mayfair, London and of Frances Capper Matthews. He was educated at Harrow (Rendall's); was gazetted Sub-Lieutenant, unattached, 15 July 1876, and joined the 4th King's Own Royal Regiment 15 July 1876. He served in the South African War of 1879, in the Zulu Campaign, and received the Medal and clasp. He was Adjutant, King's Own Regiment, 14 October 1879, to 22 December 1885, and became Captain 14 April, 1885; was Adjutant, Militia, 13 January 1891 to 14 January 1896, and became Major 12 July 1893. Major Matthews served in the South African War, 1899-1902, being in command 2nd Battalion Royal Lancaster Regiment 23 February to 27 May 1900, and from 2 February 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900), and action at Pieter's Hill. Operations in Natal, March to May 1900; operations in the Transvaal, February to April, 1901, and September to October 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, July 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches by Sir R H Buller 30 March and November 1900 [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 8 December 1900; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Frank Broadwood Matthews, Major (now Lieutenant Colonel), the King's Own (Royal Lancaster) Regiment. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". (Insignia, etc, sent to Commander-in-Chief, South Africa, and presented by the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 August 1901.) He became Lieutenant Colonel 13 December 1900; commanded the 2nd Battalion King's Own (Royal Lancaster) Regiment, and was given the Brevet of Colonel 10 February 1904. He retired with the rank of Colonel 13 December 1904. Colonel Matthews served in the European War; became a temporary Brigadier General 11 March, 1915; was created a CB, 1916, and on 18 March, 1919, was given the honorary rank of Brigadier General. He married, in 1889, Edith Mabel Warner, daughter of R G Price, of 26, Hyde Park Gardens, London and they had one son and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Royal Lancaster Regiment
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