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 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
NicholCharles EdwardLieutenant ColonelNICHOL, CHARLES EDWARD, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 31 May 1859, son of T Dale Nichol, of Jesmond, Newcastle-on-Tyne. He was educated at the Edinburgh Collegiate School and University (MB and CM 1881). He entered the Army Medical Service in 1882; served with the 3rd Brigade, Burma Field Force, 1885-87, and was present at several engagements around Ningyan and Jemethen (Medal with clasp). After 12 years' service he became Major, RAMC, 4 February 1894. He served in the South African War, 1899-1901; commanded the 19th Brigade Bearer Company. Took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain) and Vet River (5 and 6 May); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Lydenberg (5 to 8 September); again in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Elands River (4 to 16 August); also again in the Transvaal, December 1900 to August 1901 (Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April 1901]; Queen's Medal with four clasps). He became Lieutenant Colonel 4 February 1902, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Charles Edward Nichol, MB, Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Army Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Insignia, Warrant and Statutes sent to Commander-in-Chief in India; presented by the OC Roorkee, at a Review Parade at Roorkee, 21 February 1903. Lieutenant Colonel Nichol was appointed Commandant, Royal Army Medical Corps School of Instruction, and OC Depot, 5 November 1906, and held this position until 31 October 1909; was promoted Colonel and Principal Medical Officer, India, 9 March 1912; became ADMS, India. He served in the European War from 1914 to 1916, as DDMS of an Army Corps, and DMS of an Army, and for his services was mentioned in Despatches and created a CMG in 1916. He retired 26 December 1917. Colonel Nichol married, in 1898, Emmeline Kingscote, daughter of Major T Gordon, Indian Army.
CMG, DSO, IGS 1885 (1) Burma 1885-7 (Surg Med Staff), QSA (4) CC Drief Trans SA 01 (Lt Col), 1914-15 Star (Col, AMS), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Surg-Gen), 1911 Delhi Durbar. Lovell 1978 est £470.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
NichollDonald Fitz RoyCaptainNICHOLL, DONALD FITZ ROY, Captain, was born in 1872, son of General Thomas Nicholl, Colonel Commandant, Royal Artillery. He entered the Royal Artillery 12 February 1892, and was promoted to Lieutenant 12 February 1895; he served in South Africa from 16 December 1899 to 11 January 1900; as Assistant Disembarkation Staff Officer from 12 January 1900 to 4 July 1900, and he became Captain 1 January 1900. Captain Nicholl was present at operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Frederickstad (17 to 25 October). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Donald Fitz Roy Nicholl, Captain, Royal Garrison Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC, Malta, 10 February 1902, and presented on 21 February 1902, by the Commander-in-Chief, Malta. He was Officer, Company of Gentleman Cadets, Royal Military Academy, 8 February 1909 to 7 February 1913; was promoted to Major, 9 August 1912. He served in the European War from 1914; was DAA and QMG, Thames and Medway Defences, 28 November 1914 to 30 June 1916; commanded a Heavy Artillery Group, BEF, France, 1916-18; was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 1 May 1917. Lieutenant Colonel D F Nicholl married, in 1906, Ethel, daughter of the Reverend Canon Branch, of Trinidad.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Garrison Artillery
NicholsonBertramLieutenantNICHOLSON, BERTRAM, Lieutenant, served in South Africa with the Imperial Light Horse, 1902. He was awarded the Medal, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Bertram Nicholson, Lieutenant, 2nd Imperial Light Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was Sub-Native Commissioner, Hlatikulu, Swaziland, 1902-7; Assistant Resident Magistrate, 1904-7; Assistant Commissioner, 1907.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Light Horse
NicholsonOctavius Henry LothianLieutenantNICHOLSON, OCTAVIUS HENRY LOTHIAN, Lieutenant, was born 23 July 1877, sixth son of General Sir Lothian Nicholson, KCB. He was educated at St Paul's School, and Sandhurst; passed into the Army 8 September 1897, as Second Lieutenant, West Yorkshire Regiment, and was promoted Lieutenant 15 February 1899. He served during the South African War, 1899-1902, taking part in the operations in Natal, 1899; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; during operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; during operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 1900, and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in Natal, March to April 1900. He served as Adjutant, 2nd Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment, from 1 August 1901 to 31 May 1902; operations in the Transvaal, February 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 26 January 1900, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Octavius Henry Lothian Nicholson, Lieutenant, West Yorkshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 13 December 1902. He was promoted Captain 17 August 1904; was ADC to GO, Commanding-in-Chief, Bermuda, from 31 October 1908 to 15 December 1911. He served during the European War as DAQMG 5 August 1914; was Brigade Major, 3rd Infantry Brigade, BEF, 26 November 1914 to 17 March 1915; Brigade Major, 51st Infantry Brigade, New Armies, 10 June 1915. He was given the Brevet of Major 18 February 1915, and became Major 1 September 1915. He was General Staff Officer, 2nd Grade, 8th Division, BEF, October 1915 to 11 January 1916; GSO2, 1st Army, 1916-17; General Staff Officer, 1st Grade, 5th Division, BEF, British Armies in France, 1917-1919; General Staff Officer, 1st Grade, War Office (Temporary), 27 March 1919. He received the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 3 June 1917. He was mentioned eight times in Despatches, and created a CMG in 1918; Chevalier of the Legion of Honour, and was awarded the Croix de Guerre avec Palme. Lieutenant Colonel Nicholson married, in 1911, Eileen May Montague, daughter of Major General Montague Browne, of St John's Point, Kellough, County Down, and they had one son and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince of Wales's Own) West Yorkshire Regiment
NicolAndrew Geddes BainCaptainNICOL, ANDREW GEDDES BAIN, Captain, was born in the district of Albany, Cape Colony, in 1878, son of William Nicol, of Fife, Scotland, and A S Bain. He was educated at a County School in the district of Albany; was a Stock Farmer up to the age of 21; mining and managing electrical plant at Barberton. At the outbreak of the Transvaal War he joined Bethune's Mounted Infantry at Maritzburg as a Trooper; fought throughout Colenso, then in all tights up to the Relief of Ladysmith; then with Buller into the Transvaal; back to Vryheid. He served through Captain Goff's disaster, and was one of the few who escaped. He was promoted Sergeant, for this. He entered the Johannesburg Mounted Rifles as Lieutenant under Bruce Hamilton and Colonel Stewart; served with Hamilton's Column, and assisted in the capture of Cherry Emmett; captured the notorious Boer Goetser, Landrost of New Amsterdam, Transvaal; was awarded the DSO for the latter. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Andrew Geddes Bain Nicol, Captain, Johannesburg Mounted Rifles. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Captain Nicol recruited for the Johannesburg Mounted Rifles, and organized the Volunteer Movement in Johannesburg. He was a good game shot and rider.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Johannesburg Mounted Rifles
Nolan-NeylanJohnMajorNOLAN-NEYLAN, JOHN, Major, was born 14 May 1854, in the County Clare, Ireland, the son of D Nylan and Mary Nolan, his wife; and nephew of Captain L E Nolan. John Nolan, first saw active service in 1877-78-79, in Gaika, Gaeleka and Moirosi's Mountain (Medal with clasp). He joined the Cape Mounted Riflemen on 1 Nov. 1879, and was present in operations in Basutoland and Transkei, 1880-81 (Medal with clasp). He served with the Cape Mounted Police in Bechuanaland, 1896-97 (General Service Medal with clasp). In the South African War of 1899 to 1902, this Irishman from the County Clare was also present. His deeds are told at length by Sir A. Conan Doyle's "Great Boer War" as are those of another of his name, at Spion Kop, when: "A detached group of the South Lancashires was summoned to surrender. 'When I surrender,' cried Colour-Sergt. Nolan,' it will be my dead body!' " When Bethulie Railway Bridge had been blown to smithereens by the re­treating Boers, the only hope of preserving some means of crossing the Orange River lay in the hope that the British troops might be beforehand with the Boers who were just going to destroy the road bridge also. “In this” says Sir A. Conan Doyle, in “The Great Boer War” (pages 270-271), “they were singularly favoured by fortune. On the arrival of a small party of scouts and of the Cape Police under Major Nolan-Neylan at the end of the bridge it was found that all was ready to blow it up, the mine sunk, the detonator fixed, and the wire laid. Only the connection between the wire and the charge had not been made. To make sure, the Boers had also laid several boxes of dynamite under the last span, in case the mine should fail in its effect. The advance guard of the Police, only six in number, with Nolan-Neylan at their head, threw themselves into a building which commanded the approaches of the bridge, and this handful of men opened so spirited and well-aimed a fire that the Boers were unable to approach it. As fresh scouts and policemen came up they were thrown into the firing line, and for a whole long day they kept the destroyers from the bridge. Had the enemy known how weak they were and how far from supports, they could have easily destroyed them; but the game of bluff was admirably played, and a fire kept up which held the enemy to their rifle pits. The Boers were in a trench commanding the bridge, and their brisk fire made it impossible to cross. On the other hand, our rifle fire commanded the mine and prevented any one from exploding it. But at the approach of darkness it was certain that this would be done. The situation was saved by the gallantry of young Popham of the Derbyshires, who crept across with two men and removed the detonators. There still remained the dynamite under the further span, and this also they removed, carrying it off across the bridge under a heavy fire. The work was made absolutely complete a little later by the exploit of Captain Grant, of the Sappers, who drew the charges from the holes in which they had been sunk, and dropped them into the river, thus avoiding the chance that they might be exploded next morning by shell fire. The feat of Popham and of Grant was not only most gallant, but of extraordinary service to the country; but the highest credit belongs to Nolan-Neylan, of the Police, for the great promptitude and gallantry of his attack, and to M'Neill for his support. On that road bridge and on the pontoon bridge at Norval's Pont Lord Robert's army was for a whole month dependent for their supplies". Major Neylan was wounded in action 13 August 1901; was mentioned three times in Despatches ; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette. 27 Sept. 1901]: "John Nolan-Neylan, Major, Cape Police. In recognition of services during the operations in Cape Colony". He was Second-in-Command of General Gorringe's Flying Column, and was Commander of the Orange River Scouts. Lieutenant Colonel Nolan-Neylan retired from the Cape Mounted Police. He married, 17 August 1881, Minnie, daughter of R P Impey, of Aliwal North, Cape Colony; they had four sons: Lawrence, born 14 November 1886 ; Denis, born 2 May 1890 ; Richard, born 8 April 1896, and Vivian, born 14 October 1901; and six daughters: Kathleen, Eily, Clare, Marie, Nora and Ita.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Cape Police
NorieCharles Edward de ManleyMajorNORIE, CHARLES EDWARD DE MANLEY, Brevet Major, was born 7 August 1866. He was the son of Major General Evelyn Medows Norie. He entered the Army, as a Lieutenant in the Yorkshire Light Infantry, 9 May 1885, and was transferred to the Indian Staff Corps 31 July 1887. In 1891 he was with the expedition to Manipur (Medal with clasp). He became Captain 9 May 1896. He served on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98; took part in the operations on the Samana during August and September 1897; at the relief of Gulistan (Medal with two clasps); served at Tirah, 1897-98; took part in the actions of Chagru Kotal, Dargai and capture of the Sampagha and Arhanga Passes; took part in the operations in the Warran Valley and action of 16 November 1897; during the operations at and around Dwatoi and action of 24 November 1897; against the Khani Khel Chamkanis; also during operations in the Bara Valley 7 to 14 December 1897 (severely wounded; Despatches [London Gazette, 1 March and 5 April 1898]; given the Brevet of Major 20 May 1898; clasp). He served in the South African War; was on Special Service, South Africa, 20 January to 30 March 19CO (including Staff Duty, under an Assistant Inspector-General); was Commandant 1 May to 21 November 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Charles Edward de Manley Norie, Brevet Major, Indian Staff Corps. For services during operations in South Africa". Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were presented by GOC, Lahore, at a full Garrison Parade at Dalhousie, 12 April 1903. He was promoted Major 9 May 1903; was DAAG, India, 24 April 1904 to 14 July 1907; promoted Lieutenant Colonel 2 April 1911. Lieutenant Colonel Norie served in the European War from 1914 to 1917. He was GSO, Meerut Division, BEF, 6 January to 15 July 1915; was given the Brevet of Colonel 18 February 1915; was temporary Brigadier General 16 July 1915 to 27 March 1917; DA and QMG, Indian Army Corps, BEF, 16 July to 13 September 1915; Brigade Commander, Bareilly Brigade, BEF, and 21st Infantry Brigade, Indian Expeditionary Force “D,11 September 1915 to 27 March 1917. He became Colonel 1 January 1917. He served in the Mesopotamian Campaign, and was five times mentioned in Despatches, and created a CB in 1916, and a CMG in 1917. His Regiment was the 2nd Goorkhas. He married, in 1899, Grace, daughter of W H Reynolds, and they had two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Staff Corps
NormanMontagu ColletCaptainNORMAN, MONTAGU COLLET, Captain, was the son of F H Norman, of Moor Place, Much Hadham, Herts. He was educated at Eton, and King's College, Cambridge, and served in the South African War, 1900-1; was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Montagu Collet Norman Captain, 4th Bedfordshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Deputy Governor, Bank of England (1918), and Lieutenant, City of London.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bedfordshire Regiment
NormandPatrick HillLieutenantNORMAND, PATRICK HILL, Lieutenant, was born 20 February 1876, son of Patrick Hill Normand. He was educated at Fettes College, Edinburgh; joined the Imperial Light Horse, as Lieutenant, in 1899, at Maritzburg, Natal, and helped to form the regiment. He was present at the battle of Elandslaagte (wounded); in the Siege of Ladysmith; was wounded at Wagon Hill on 6 January; went with General Mahon's Column to the Relief of Mafeking; took part in the advance on Barberton, with General French's Column. He was mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Patrick Hill Normand, Lieutenant, Imperial Light Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Deputy Governor, Transvaal Prisons Department, in 1903, and Governor in 1908. From May 1917 to March 1919, he served with the Expeditionary Force in France as Deputy Assistant Provost-Marshal. Captain Normand married, in 1907, Matilda M Marsh, and they had three sons.
DSO, QSA (4) RofM Eland DofL Trans (Capt DSO ILH), KSA (2) (Capt DSO ILH), BWM, Victory Medal. Christies 1989 £770.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Light Horse
NortheyWilliamLieutenantNORTHEY, WILLIAM, Lieutenant, was born 29 January 1876, son of the Reverend Edward William Northey, MA, JP, of Woodcote House, Epsom. He served in South Africa, as Lieutenant, Durham Light Infantry, on the Staff, 1899 to 1902; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 1900, and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900. He served as Adjutant, 13th Battalion Mounted Infantry, 30 November 1900 to March 1902; operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to April 1902; operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal, September and October 1901. He received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901, and 29 July 1902], and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "William Northey, Lieutenant, Durham Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented there. He became Captain 26 November 1901; was Paymaster, AP Department, 12 May 1903, and 2nd Class Assistant, Army Accounts Department, 1 May 1905. He married, in 1905, Violet, daughter of Thomas James Ferguson, of Calicut, India, and they had two sons: William Edward, born in 1909, and Denys Vernon, born in 1910. Captain Northey served in the European War in 1914, and died of wounds 22 October 1914, at the Base Hospital, Boulogne. An obituary notice of him appeared in the 'Times' of 27 October 1914.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Durham Light Infantry
NortonAlfred Edward MarstonCaptainNORTON, ALFRED EDWARD MARSTON, Captain, was born 13 July 1869, son of John Norton, of Golding Hall, Shropshire. He served in the South African War in 1900, taking part in operations in Orange River Colony and Cape Colony. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Alfred Edward Marston Norton, Captain, South Australian Contingent. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by Lord Tennyson, at Adelaide, 12 April 1902. He became Major, Reserve of Officers, Unattached List, Australian Military Forces, 21 August 1911. He served in the European War, and was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel. Lieutenant Colonel Norton married, in 1895, Fannie Margaret Stacy.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South Australia contingent
NunnThomas Henry ClaytonCaptainNUNN, THOMAS HENRY CLAYTON, Captain, was born 11 August 1873, son of the Reverend John Bridges Nunn. He joined the Militia in 1891; entered the Royal West Kent Regiment, as Second Lieutenant from the Militia, 2 June 1894, becoming Lieutenant 16 May 1890, and Captain 2 August 1902. He served in South Africa, 1900-2, taking part in the operations in Orange Free State, February to May 1800; operations in the Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899 to 1900. He served as Adjutant, 27th Battalion Mounted Infantry, 27 January to 31 March 1902; operations in the Transvaal, November 1901 to April 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, March 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1802]; awarded the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1802]: "Thomas Henry Clayton Nunn, Captain, The Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He served as Adjutant, Mounted Infantry, Egypt, 26 May 1902 to 12 June 1905, and Brigade Major, Southern Mounted Infantry Brigade, Southern Command, 2 November 1911 to 4 August 1914. He became Major 1 September 1914. He was twice mentioned in Despatches, and given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel. He served in the European War from 1914, as Brigade Major, Southern Mounted Infantry Brigade; Central Force, Home Defence, BEF; 145th Infantry Brigade, BEF, 5 August 1914 to 21 November 1915; GSO2, 46th Division, BEF, 22 November 1915 to 18 March 1916; GSO1, GHQ, Home Forces, 27 June to 28 July 1916; GS01, 58th Division, Home Forces; British Armies in France 5 September 1916 to 19 March 1917; GSO1, Humber Garrison, 13 November 1918. In 1902, he married Aileen Sybil, daughter of Major John Tatham, RHA.
DSO, QSA (5) CC OFS Trans SA 01 SA 02 (Capt 2/RWK Regt), 1914 Star (Maj), BWM, Victory Medal (Lt Col). Glendinings 1986 £680.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Queen's Own) Royal West Kent Regiment
O'BrienMurroughCaptainO'BRIEN, THE HONOURABLE MURROUGH, Captain, was born 8 November 1866, son of the 14th Baron Inchiquin. He was gazetted to the Northumberland Fusiliers 26 February 1887; was promoted Lieutenant 27 January 1890, and Captain 20 December 1895. He was ADC to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland from 30 July 1895. Captain O'Brien served in the South African War, 1899-1901 (employed with Mounted Infantry). He was Commandant at Edenburg; was slightly wounded; took part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "The Honourable Murrough O'Brien, Captain, Northumberland Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent on the 6th March 1902. He was promoted to Major 2 October 1901. Major O'Brien was created an MVO in 1903, and retired from the Northumberland Fusiliers 10 November 1906. He was appointed to the post of Military Attache at Washington. He married, in 1906, Marguerite, daughter of William Lewis, of New York, and they had two sons.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Northumberland Fusiliers
O'DonnellThomas JosephMajorO'DONNELL, THOMAS JOSEPH, Major, was born 18 January 1858, third son of P O'Donnell, High Constable of the Barony of Glenquin, of Killeedy, Ashford, County Limerick. He was educated at Stanislas' College, Tullabeg, King's County, and is a Fellow of the Institute of Public Health. He served with the Field Artillery, Egypt, 1881-82 (Medal and Bronze Star). Under Sir C Warren, with the Kimberley Light Horse, in the Bechuanaland Expedition, 1885; with the Inniskilling Dragoons, in the operations in Zululand, 1888. After twelve years' service, he became Major, Royal Army Medical Corps, 5 February 1893. Major O'Donnell served in the Tirah Campaign, with the 3rd Battalion The Rifle Brigade, 1897-98 (Medal with clasp). He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and was present at the advance on Kimberley, including the action at Magersfontein; Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Karee Siding, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal in May and June, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June). Operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Bethlehem (6 and 7 July) and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in the Transvaal, July 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 March, 1900, and 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps; King's Medal with two clasps; and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Thomas Joseph O'Donnell, Major (now Lieutenant Colonel), Royal Army Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 3 June, 1901. He had become Lieutenant Colonel 5 February 1901; was promoted to Colonel 7 July 1910; was PMO, India, 7 July 1910; Administrative Medical Officer, Southern Command, up to the 6th July 1914. He served in the European War from 1914; was Assistant Director of Medical Services 5 August 1914 to 31 December 1914; Deputy Director-General of Medical Services 1 January 1915; became Surgeon General 13 February 1915; was Administrative Medical Officer at Tidworth. Surgeon General T J O'Donnell was mentioned twice in Despatches (1914 and 1916) for his services in the European War, and was created a CB in 1916 and a KCIE in 1919. He retired 18 January 1918. Sir T J O'Donnell was fond of hunting, shooting and racing, and rode many winners in South Africa and India.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
O'FarrellMMajorO'FARRELL, M, Major, was born in October 1852. He served in the South African War, with the Victorian Mounted Rifles, 1900-2; with the Rhodesian Field Force, on the Staff, Western District, and as Staff Officer, No 13 Martial Law Area, Cape Colony District; operations in Rhodesia, Transvaal and Orange River Colony. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "M O'Farrell, Major, Victorian Contingent. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was placed on the retired list, with the rank of Major, 1 August 1908.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Victoria contingent
O'GormanCharles JohnLieutenantO'GORMAN, CHARLES JOHN, Lieutenant, was born 24 July 1872. He was educated at Clongowes (was LRCPI and LRCSI), and entered the Royal Army Medical Corps 28 January 1898. He served in the South African War, 1899 to 1902, and was present at the Defence of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, April to May 1900; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to July 1900, including actions at Lindley (1 June) and Rhenoster River; operations in Cape Colony, north and south of Orange River, 1899-1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 May 1900, and 16 April 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Charles John O'Gorman, Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to South Africa, to the GOC, Transvaal, and were presented by General Lyttelton at Pretoria 14 January 1903. He became Captain 28 January 1901; was employed with the South African Constabulary 31 December 1904, and was promoted to Major 28 January 1910, and to Lieutenant Colonel 1 August 1915. He was Assistant Director of Medical Services, 2nd East African Division, East African Force, 23 February to 31 March 1916; Assistant Director of Medical Services, Lines of Communication, East African Force, 10 December 1916 to 22 February 1918; Assistant Director of Medical Services, General Headquarters, East African Force, 23 February to 31 May 1918; Assistant Director of Medical Services, 18th Division, British Armies in France, 18 February 1919, and Acting Colonel. Colonel O'Gorman died on 11 May 1930. Having lost his Boer War medals, duplicates were issued on 14 April 1919.
DSO, QSA (3) DofK OFS Trans (Capt DSO, RAMC) (late issue), KSA (2) (Capt DSO, RAMC) (late issue), 1914-15 Star (Maj DSO, RAMC), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Lt Col). Glendinings 1991 £920. DNW Dec 06 £2,200. Dixon Mar 07 £2,895.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
O'MearaBulkeley Ernest AdolphusCaptainO'MEARA, BULKELEY ERNEST ADOLPHUS, Captain, was born at Umballa, India, 1 February 1867, son of Alfred O'Meara, of St Mark's, Simla, India. He was educated at Dulwich College, and at King's College School, Somerset House, London. He served as a trooper in the original Pioneer Force which annexed Rhodesia to the British Empire, 1889-91; was Surveyor in the De Beers Consolidated Mines, Limited, Kimberley. He served in the South African War, 1899-1901, in the Kimberley Town Guard; was transferred to the Intelligence Department in 1900, and was Intelligence Officer for Griqualand West, as far as Mafeking; was SO1 to Vryberg and Carnarvon Columns; Press Censor and Interpreter and Intelligence Officer at Oudtshoorn, under Acting Inspector-General Western. He was four times mentioned in Despatches, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Bulkeley Ernest Adolphus O'Meara, Captain, Kimberley Town Guard. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to South Africa, and presented to him there. He was subsequently appointed Government Surveyor for the Cape and Transvaal Colonies, practising at Johannesburg. He was a keen sportsman, taking part in all kinds of South African sport, including big game shooting in the north. Captain O'Meara died 31 August 1916.
DSO, QSA (1) DofK (Capt DSO, KTG)(renamed), 1914-15 Star (Lt, EAMR). Spink 1983 £1,200.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Kimberley TG
O'NeillWilliam Henry SlingsbyMajorO'NEILL, WILLIAM HENRY SLINGSBY, Major, was bom 28 May 1854, son of the Reverend John O'Neill, of Clonmore, County Carlow. He was educated at Cains College, Cambridge, and joined the Army as Sub-Lieutenant, unattached, 10 September 1875, and the 103rd Foot (The Royal Dublin Fusiliers), 10 September 1875. He became Captain 20 January 1884; Adjutant, Auxiliary Forces, 9 February 1886, to 8 February 1891; was promoted Major 16 May 1894. Major O'Neill served in the South African War from 1899 to 1902, in command 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers (12 June to 16 August 1900). He was present at the Relief of Ladysmith; operations in the Transvaal, June, 1900; operations in Natal (March to June, 1900), including the action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July 1900. Operations in the Orange River Colony, June, 1900. He took part in the operations in the Transvaal, December 1900; was Commandant at Durban from 20 December 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 7 February 1901]: received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "William Henry Slingsby O'Neill, Major, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by Colonel Lyttleton, at Lyttleton, South Africa. He retired 28 May 1902. He served in the European War as Lieutenant Colonel Commanding the 3rd Royal Dublin Fusilisers. Colonel O'Neill married, in 1889, Selina, daughter of Hugh Henry, of Firment, County Kildare and they had one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Dublin Fusiliers
OgilvyAngus Howard ReginaldCaptainOGILVY, ANGUS HOWARD REGINALD, Captain, was born on 12 August 1860. He entered the 13th Hussars 22 January 1881; became Lieutenant 1 July 1881, and Captain 1 July 1888; was Adjutant, Yeomanry Cavalry, 1 August 1890 to 31 July 1895. He served in the South African War, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Angus Howard Reginald Ogilvy, Captain, 13th Hussars. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 17 December 1901. He was promoted to Major. Major Ogilvy died at Fez 4 July 1906.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
13th Hussars
OgilvyJohn Herbert CecilLieutenantOGILVY, JOHN HERBERT CECIL, Lieutenant, served in the South African War with the Canadian Military Forces, and was transferred to the Gordon Highlanders. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "John Herbert Cecil Ogilvy, Lieutenant, Royal Canadian Regiment (now Captain, Gordon Highlanders). In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and thence to the GOC, Transvaal, and presented 25 July 1901. Captain Ogilvy died 19 December 1901.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Gordon Highlanders
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