Search:
(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
SaundersEdward AldboroughCaptainSAUNDERS, EDWARD ALDBOROUGH, Captain, was born 7 January 1873, at Golden Fort, Stratford-on-Slaney, Ireland, son of Major Morley Caulfeild Saunders, 12th Suffolks, of Golden Fort, Stratford-on-Slaney. He was educated at The Old Hall School, Wellington, Shropshire, and at the RM Academy, Woolwich, and joined the Royal Artillery 1 January 1894. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902: as Special Service Officer, graded as Staff Captain, Lines of Communication, Headquarters, from 7 August 1899 to 2 January 1900; took part in the advance on Kimberley, January and February 1900; in the operations in the Orange Free State, April 1900; became Captain 9 April 1900; was ADC to Major General R Pole-Carew, 1900; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July 1900 to January 1901, including Venterskroon (7 and 9 August 1900); was ADC to Major General C W H Douglas; operations in the Orange River Colony, May and July 1900, including Lindley and Rhenoster River; operations in Cape Colony, north of the Orange River, February and March 1900; was employed as Staff Officer, Lines of Communication, and Cape Colony District, graded as DAAG, March 1901 to December 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Edward Aldborough Saunders, Captain, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". There is no official account of any specific action for which Captain Saunders's DSO was awarded, but it was probably given in connection with an action against Christian De Wet at Rhenoster River 11 June 1900, when seven Boers surrendered to him single-handed when he was on reconnaissance duty, and they were handed over by him personally, as prisoners of war, on the arrival of our troops. Captain Saunders was at the time ADC to Major General C W H Douglas. Captain Saunders's subsequent services include: Staff Captain, RA, South-Eastern District, 1904-5; Staff Officer for Defences and General Staff Officer, Newcastle-on-Tyne Coast Defences, 1905-8; Acting AAG, Headquarters, Army of Occupation in Egypt, July and October 1908. He retired from the Army 5 April 1911.
DSO, QSA (3) OFS Trans CC (Capt, DSO RGA), KSA (2) (Capt, DSO RGA). Bostock 1989 £750. Glendinings 1989 £510.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
SaundersErnest HowieLieutenantSAUNDERS, ERNEST HOWIE, Lieutenant, was born 18 November 1877, son of Colonel W E Saunders, CB. He entered the Royal Irish Rifles 8 September 1897, as Second Lieutenant, becoming Lieutenant in the Army 8 December 1899, and in the Royal Irish Rifles 24 February 1900. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; employed with Mounted Infantry; took part in the operations in Orange Free State, March to April 1900; in the Transvaal, June to November 1900; also in Cape Colony, 1899 to 1900 (Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; Queen's Medal with three clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps). He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Ernest Howie Saunders, Lieutenant, Royal Irish Rifles. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 18 December 1902. On 8 September 1900, he was promoted to Captain in the Army, and on 24 November 1908 was transferred to the Indian Army, in which he became Major 1 September 1915. Major Saunders married, in 1906, Primrose Ellen, daughter of Carr Stephen.
DSO, OBE (1st m), QSA (3) CC OFS Trans (Lt, DSO RIR), KSA (2) (Lt, DSO RIR), 1914 Star and Bar (Capt, DSO, S&TC), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Maj), 1911 Delhi Durbar. Glendinings 1969 £340. Glendinings 1992 est £900-1200.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Irish Rifles
SaundersFrederick JohnLieutenantSAUNDERS, FREDERICK JOHN, Lieutenant, was born at Peckham 18 September 1876, fifth and youngest son of William Saunders, of Clevedon, Sydenham. He was educated at the Mercers' School, London. He was appointed to his first commission in the Royal Marine Light Infantry 1 February 1895, and promoted Lieutenant in January 1896. He was sent to China, where he joined the Powerful, and served with the Royal Marine Guard at Wei-hai-Wei in July 1898. In 1899, on the outbreak of the Boer War, the Powerful was ordered to the Cape, and on 20 October 1899, the first Naval Brigade was landed to defend Stormberg, Lieutenant Saunders commanding a detachment. He fought in every action in which the brigade took part, including the Battles of Belmont, Graspan and Modder River (preceding the Relief of Kimberley), and at Paardeberg, where Lord Roberts defeated Cronje and decided the fate of Bloemfontein. He took part in Lord Roberts's march into Bloemfontein, acting as Adjutant, Naval Brigade. He advanced to Kronstad, was seized with enteric and invalided home. He was mentioned in Despatches 30 March 1900; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Frederick John Saunders, Lieutenant, Royal Marine Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". An official despatch says that the decoration was awarded "for his gallant work at the Battle of Graspan, where he climbed to the top of a hill, gallantly leading his men all the time under a heavy fire" (Official Despatch). The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, 29 November 1900, and presented in South Africa 11 June 1901. Being the tallest man in the Naval Brigade, he had some very narrow escapes; one bullet passed through his pocket-book, another through the magazine of the rifle he was firing (without exploding four live cartridges still remaining in the magazine); one went through his sleeve, another through his helmet, and yet another through his water-bottle. Before the close of the campaign, he was awarded the Queen's Medal, with clasps for Belmont, Modder River, Paardeberg and Bloemfontein, and also the King's Medal. He was promoted Captain in 1901. Lieutenant Colonel Saunders was appointed Naval Intelligence Officer at Singapore, 1909-12, and served on the Staff of the Royal Marine Light Infantry at Chatham, 1913—14. He was promoted Major, July 1914. During the European War he served in Gallipoli as Brigade Major of the 3rd Royal Marine Division, and was mentioned in General Monro's Despatches for distinguished service during the evacuation. On the transference of the Royal Naval Division to France in May 1916, he was promoted Temporary Lieutenant Colonel in command of the 1st Arison Battalion. He was killed in action from shell fire 12 November 1916, after commanding his battalion with the utmost valour and distinction. His death occurred only the day before the date of Sir Douglas Haig's Despatches in which the gallantry of Lieutenant Colonel Saunders receives conspicuous mention. He married, 31 July 1902, Muriel, only daughter of A Maxwell Tod, of Walmer, Kent, and they had one son, Maxwell Pornerov, born 29 October 1903.
DSO, QSA (4) Bel M-R Paard Drief (Lt HMS Powerful), 1914-15 Star (Lt Col, DSO, RMLI), BWM, Victory Medal (Lt Col RMLI). Royal Marine Museum, Portsmouth 1992.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Marine Light Infantry
SaundersGeorge Frederick CullenCaptainSAUNDERS, GEORGE FREDERICK CULLEN, Captain, was born 16 April 1869, son of Major G N Saunders, Bengal Staff Corps. He was gazetted to the Bedfordshire Regiment 9 November 1889, becoming Lieutenant 29 March 1892. He served in the Isazai Expedition, 1892; in the Chitral Expedition, 1895, with the Relief Force (Medal with clasp); was promoted to Captain 12 October 1898. Captain Saunders served in the South African War, 1899-1902, taking part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; operations in the Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including action at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including action at Colesberg (1 January to 12 February); operations in the Transvaal, April to May 1902: operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "George Frederick Cullen Saunders, Captain, Bedfordshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC, Cape Colony District, 15 November 1902, and the Insignia were presented by Colonel Pilcher at Naauwpoort 22 February 1903. He was Adjutant, Militia, from 4 January 1908; became Major 1 September 1913, and retired 18 March 1914. Major Saunders married, in 1907, Mabel Elizabeth Wilgress (who died in 1919), daughter of T Wilgress Mills, of Elthain, Kent.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bedfordshire Regiment
SavileGeorge Walter WreyMajorSAVILE, GEORGE WALTER WREY, Major, was born on 14 March 1860, at Torquay, Devon, son of Lieutenant Colonel John Walter Savile, JP, and Sarah Emma Savile. He was educated at Marlborough College, and joined the Army on 6 August 1879, as Second Lieutenant; was promoted Lieutenant in 1880; Captain in 1887, and Major in 1900. He served in the South African War from 1899 to 1902, and was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop (severely wounded); operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900), and action at Pieter's Hill. Operations in the Transvaal in June 1900. Operations in Natal, March, to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June). Operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria. July to 29 November 1900. Operations in Orange River Colony, June 1900. Operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, in 1899. Mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901], received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "George Walter Wrey Savile, Major, Middlesex Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to South Africa, and presented there to Major Savile by the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 August 1901. He commanded the 2nd Middlesex Regiment from 1905 to 1909; served in the Great War from 1914 to 1919 as AA and QMG, 49th (West Riding) Division, 1914-1915; Officer Commanding Troops, Town and Port, Rouen, 1915-1919; was three times mentioned in Despatches, and created a CBE in 1919. He married Ellen Louisa Parsons, daughter of Colonel A D Parsons, 2nd Madras Lancers, in 1891.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Duke of Cambridge's Own) Middlesex Regiment
SavileWalterMajorSAVILE, WALTER CLARE, Major, was born 4 July 1857, son of Colonel H B Savile. He was educated at Clifton College, and was gazetted to the Royal Artillery, as Lieutenant, 25 January 1877; was Inspector of Warlike Stores, Bermuda, 21 March 1881 to 21 July 1882; became Captain 6 May 1885; was Assistant to the Director of Artillery, Headquarters of Army, 19 May 1888 to 31 March, 1902; was 2nd Class Assistant Inspector of Warlike Stores, Devonport, 7 April, 1892 to 14 May 1892; became Major 29 Sept, 1894; was Ordnance Officer, 3rd Class, 6 August 1896 to 5 August 1901. He served in the South African War, 1899-1901; took part in operations in Natal and in the defence of Ladysmith. Operations in Natal, March to June, 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches (by Sir George White, 2 December 1899, and 23 March, 1900; by Sir R H Buller, 9 November 1900 [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: “Walter Clare Savile, Major, Royal Artillery, Ordnance Officer, 3rd Class, Army Ordnance Department. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa”. The Insignia were presented by the Duke of Cornwall and York 4 August 1901. He was given the Brevet of Colonel 30 January 1907, and became Colonel 28 January 1909, retiring from the Staff with the honorary rank of Brigadier General 4 July 1914. General Savile was re-employed at the War Office, 1914-15, and at the Ministry of Munitions, 1917, and was created a CB in 1917. He married, in 1881, Helen, fourth daughter of William Ruxton, Ardee House, County Louth, and they had one son and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
Schleswig-Holstein, HHChristian VictorCaptainSCHLESWIG-HOLSTEIN, HIS HIGHNESS CHRISTIAN VICTOR, PRINCE OF, Captain and Brevet Major, was born on 14 April, 1867 at Windsor Castle, son of Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein, KG, GCVO, General in the British Army, and grandson of Queen Victoria. He was educated at Wellington College; at Magdalen College, Oxford, and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst. He joined the Army in August 1888, as a Second Lieutenant in the King's Royal Rifles (60th Foot). He saw a great deal of active service. He was on General Elles's Staff, as his Orderly Officer, in the Black Mountain Expedition in January 1891, and was mentioned in Despatches. In April of the same year he served in the Miranzai Expedition, under General Sir William Lockhart, with his battalion, the 1st King's Royal Rifles. He also took part in the second Black Mountain Expedition (Hazara), and served under Sir Francis Scott, in the Ashanti Expedition, being present at Koomassi when King Prempeh and the Queen Mother made submission to the English Governor, Mr Maxwell. He was promoted, and received the Brevet Majority in recognition of his services in India and Ashanti on the 11th December 1896. He took part in the South African War; and for his services in that campaign was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "His Highness Prince Christian Victor of Schleswig-Holstein, Captain and Brevet Major, King's Royal Rifles". He was a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath and of the Royal Victorian Order, and had the Indian Frontier Medal, the Ashanti Expeditionary Medal, the Egyptian and Khedival Medal, the South African Medal, and two Jubilee Medals, and belonged to the Order of St John of Jerusalem, as well as several foreign Orders. He was an excellent cricketer, and just failed to get his 'Blue' at Oxford. He entered the Transvaal Territory on the 28th, at Buffalo River, spent a few days about Utrecht and Ingogo River; after that went back and was with Buller at the forcing of Botha's Pass, and with him marched round the Boer right to Allrnan's Nek. The capture of this position opened the gate into the Transvaal; Laing's Nek was secured, and the 5th Division occupied Yolksrust, being the first Division of the Natal Army to enter and occupy a Transvaal town. In August Prince Christian was appointed an extra ADC to Lord Roberts. He was at Pretoria, on 8 October, when he began his last letter home, which he ended up on the 10th: "I played cricket two days ago, and made 31 and 69. Unfortunately, the unaccustomed exertion has given me fever; but it is not bad, only about 100°. But I have had it two days, which is a bore". It turned out to be enteric. On the 29th he was very weak, and the Reverend George H Colbcck, Army chaplain, gave him by his own desire the Holy Communion just before he lost consciousness, Lord Roberts, Prince Francis of Teck, Lord Stanley, and his doctors and nurses being present. On the 29th he died. The Prince had always told his mother he did not want to be brought home if he died on active service, and he was buried on All Saints' Day at Pretoria. His great friend, Mr Blundell, only arrived in time to attend his funeral. Lords Roberts and Kitchener were present, and so was Prince Francis of Teck, and eight Generals were the pall-bearers: Kelly, Brabazon, Wood, Marshall, Maxwell, Inigo Jones, Baden-Powell and Surgeon General Wilson, while Colonel Campbell and the officers of the 1st Battalion King's Royal Rifles headed the mourners. One of the most touching accounts of the funeral was written in Germany by the war correspondent of the Austrian 'Neue Freie Presse'. The news of Prince Christian Victor's death was a crushing blow to his family. Queen Victoria had been optimistic to the last — and she heard of his death at Balmoral on the afternoon of the 29th. London was at the moment celebrating the return of the City Imperial Volunteers. The Queen kept back the mournful news until the evening, when, in a message to the Lord Mayor congratulating the city and its brave sons on their return and speaking of those who had fallen, Her Majesty announced to them her own bereavement in the words: "I, alas, have to grieve for the loss of a dear and most gallant grandson, who, like so many of your companions, has served and died for his Queen and country".
[GCB, GCVO,] MVO, DSO, IGS 1854 (2) Hazara 1891 Samana, Ashanti Star, Queens Sudan, QSA (6) CC T-H RofL L-N OFS Belf, 1897 Jubilee in gold, Khedives Sudan Khartoum Order of the Red Eagle (Prussia) class unknown, Order of Ernestine (Saxony) Grand Cross, Order of the Osmanie (Turkey) class unknown. Regimental Museum, Winchester 1996.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Royal Rifle Corps
SchreiberActon LemuelCaptainSCHREIBER, ACTON LEMUEL, Captain, was born 30 March 1865, at Barham Rectory, Suffolk, son of Reverend J E L Schreiber, MA, JP (son of Captain C Schreiber, of the 11th Light Dragoons), and Lucy, daughter of Captain C Phillipps, 13th Light Dragoons, of Barham Hall. He was educated at Tonbridge School, and at the Oxford Military College, and entered the Army 9 December 1884. Lieutenant Schreiber was promoted Captain, 1893, and served on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98; at Tochi, as Field Engineer (26 June to November 1897) (received Medal with clasp). He again saw active service in the South African Campaign, 1899-1902 (slightly wounded); during operations in the Orange Free State, March to May 1900, including actions at Yet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; taking part during operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August); during operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including operations in Orange River Colony. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Acton Lemuel Schreiber, Captain, Royal Engineers. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902; the Warrant, etc, sent 4 November 1902. He was appointed CRE, 1st Division, 1910-15; served in the European War, 1914-1915; Chief Engineer, 3rd Corps, July 1915; Temporary Brigadier General, July 1915; was Aide-de-Camp to the King, 1915; he was six times mentioned in Despatches; created a CB, 1916; CMG, 1918. He married, 18 June 1889, at St Paul's Church, Onslow Square, London, Evelyn Amy, daughter of Lieutenant Colonel Edmund D'Arcy Hunt, late Inniskilling Dragoons; they had two sons: E C A Schreiber, born 26 April 1890, served with the Royal Field Artillery, DSO; and O R Schreiber, born October 1893, served in the Royal Field Artillery, MC with Bar and killed at Ypres 22 October 1917.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
ScottArthur BinnyMajorSCOTT, ARTHUR BINNY, Major and Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, was born 3 January 1862. He was educated at Cheltenham College, and at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and entered the Army 23 February 1881, as a Lieutenant in the Royal Artillery, in which he was promoted Captain 31 July 1889, and Major 17 March 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902. Commanded 18th Battery, Royal Field Artillery, and P Battery, Royal Horse Artillery, and a Mobile Column. Took part in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; served during the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg, actions at Poplar Grove, Karee Siding, Vet River and Zand River; in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria; in command of Mobile Column 26 December 1901 to 18 January 1902 (temporarily), and from 28 January to 31 May 1902; again in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to July 1901, and September 1901 to 31 May 1902; in the Orange River Colony, July to September 1901, and January to March 1902; also in Cape Colony, September 1901, and May 1902 (Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 2 July 1902]; Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 29 November 1900; Queen's Medal with four clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps). He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Arthur Binny Scott, Major and Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was given the Brevet of Colonel on becoming AAG, India, 22 January 1906, and was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 11 February 1906; became Colonel 11 February 1911, and from 22 December 1911 to 1914 was in command of Royal Artillery in India. He was created a CB in 1914. Colonel Scott served in the European War. He was Brigadier General, RA, Meerut Division, British Expeditionary Force, 12 October 1914 to 15 February 1915; Brigadier General, RA, Indian Army Corps, BEF, 16 February to 6 September 1915; Major General, RA, 3rd Army, BEF, 3 October 1915 to 25 April 1918; promoted Major General 1 January 1916; Divisional Commander, 12th Division, BEF, and British Armies in France, 3 October 1915 to 25 April 1918. On 5 August 1918, he became Divisional Commander, India. He was mentioned in Despatches, and was created a KCB in 1918. Major General Sir A B Scott married, in 1894, Aimee Byng, daughter of General Charles H Hall.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
ScottGeorge JohnCaptainSCOTT, GEORGE JOHN, Captain, was born 7 May 1858, and was educated at Marlborough. He joined the Shropshire Militia in 1875; became Sub-Lieutenant, 2nd Dragoon Guards, in 1879; served with the 7th Dragoon Guards in Egypt, 1882 (Medal, with clasp for Tel-el-Kebir, and Khedive's Star); exchanged into the 18th Hussars in 1885, and retired in 1889. He served in the South African War, 1900-1, with Imperial Yeomanry; was present at operations in the Transvaal and Cape Colony, March to November 1900; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "George John Scott, Captain, 19th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 29 October 1901. He served in the City of London Yeomanry, 1901-13; and in the 3rd Middlesex Yeomanry, 1915—16. Lieutenant Colonel G J Scott, married, in 1880, Mary Ethel (who died in 1906), daughter of J F Christy, JP, of Upton, Alresford, Hants.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
19th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
ScottHarveyMajorSCOTT, HARVEY, Major, was born in 1868, son of Alderman John Oliver Scott, a former Sheriff and Mayor of Newcastle. He was an ardent Artillery Volunteer Officer; became Major, 1st Northumberland Volunteer Artillery, 11 August 1897, and commanded the Elswick Battery in the South African War. He was mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: '"Harvey Scott, Major, Elswick Battery, 1st Northumberland Volunteer Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. Major Scott was a member of the firm of Messrs John O Scott and Co, Shipowners and Colliery Owners. He went in for farming in Australia, and died at Sydney, New South Wales, on 25 June 1912.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Elswick Artillery Volunteers
ScottRobert GeorgeLieutenant ColonelSCOTT, ROBERT GEORGE, Major, served in the South African War of 1877-79; in the Gaika and Gaeleka Campaigns, and was present at the attack on Moirosi's Mountain, when he was severely wounded. He received the Medal and clasp, and was awarded the Victoria Cross. In the South African War of 1899-1902, he served in the operations in Cape Colony, the Transvaal and the Orange Free State; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "R G Scott, VC, Major, Kimberley Light Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". His death was reported in 'The Cape Times' of 4 October 1918: DEATH OF COLONEL SCOTT, VC, DSO. The death occurred at Mount Curtis, Wynberg, yesterday, of Colonel Robert George Scott, VC, DSO, at the age of 60. Deceased served during the Gaeleka, Gaika and Moirosi Campaigns, 1877-78-79 (VC), and between 1899 and 1901 he was Lieutenant Colonel of the Kimberley Light Horse, and had command of Scott's Railway Guards (which he raised) and the Cape Railway Sharpshooters. He was present during the siege of Kimberley, was mentioned in Despatches, and awarded the DSO in 1900. The funeral will take place at Plumstead Cemetery at 4.45 this afternoon. 'South Africa' of 26 October 1918 reported: THE LATE LIEUTENANT-COLONEL SCOTT, VC, DSO. Lieutenant Colonel Robert George Scott, VC, DSO, Cape Colonial Forces and late Cape Mounted Rifles, was born in 1857, and was a son of Fleet-Surgeon R C Scott, RN. Colonel Scott served in the Kaffir War of 1877-79, and the South African War of 1900-2, being mentioned in Despatches for meritorious conduct in the latter, receiving the Queen's Medal and three clasps, as well as the King's Medal and two clasps, and the DSO. In 1879, when serving as Sergeant, he received the Victoria Cross for conspicuous gallantry and devotion during an attack on Moirosi's Mountain. He volunteered to throw time-fuse shells as hand-grenades, over a line of stone barricades from behind which the enemy were bringing a heavy fire to bear on the Colonial troops, which it was impossible effectually to return. After causing all the men of his party to seek cover lest the shell should burst prematurely—by which precaution many lives were, in all probability, saved—Sergeant Scott advanced under heavy fire, and reaching the wall, made two attempts to throw shells across to the other side. In consequence of some defect in the fuse, which had been ignited before casting, the shell exploded at the second attempt. His right hand was blown to pieces, and he was severely wounded in the left leg, suffering also minor wounds on the body and limbs. His escape from death was miraculous, but he recovered, and lived until 3 October last, when he died at Cape Town.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Kimberley Light Horse
ScottRobert KellockCaptainSCOTT, ROBERT KELLOCK, Captain, was born 29 November 1871, at Perth, Ontario, Canada, third son of Colonel Thomas Scott, late Collector of Customs, Winnipeg, Canada. He was educated at the Royal Military College, Kingston, Canada, and served during the rising in the North-West Territories of Canada, 1885 (Medal). He joined the Royal Artillery as Second Lieutenant 16 July 1891; was promoted to Lieutenant 1(5 July 1894, and Captain 16 July 1899. He was Ordnance Officer, 4th Class, 26 April 1896 to 23 April 1902. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; appointed to act in a superior Departmental rank (Army Ordnance Department); took part in the operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900; in Cape Colony, north of Orange River; in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to February 1901; again in Cape Colony, March 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 17 June and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Robert Kellock Scott, Captain, Royal Artillery. For services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 12 June 1903. Captain Scott was also given the Brevet of Major 22 August 1902. He was Ordnance Officer, 3rd Class, 24 April 1902 to 25 April 1903; 26 April 1903 to 31 January 1904; 1 February 1904 to 31 March 1907; was transferred to the Army Ordnance Department in 1903; was promoted to Major 1 February 1904 to Lieutenant Colonel 1 April 1906; was seconded for service with the Canadian Militia in 1907; became Colonel 1 April 1907; 2nd Class Ordnance Officer 1 April 1907 to 7 December 1914; was Principal Ordnance Officer, Canada, 1908; Chief Ordnance Officer, Bermuda, 1908-14. He became Assistant Director of Equipment and Ordnance Stores, War Office, 1 August 1914; Colonel, ranking as Major General, 8 December 1914, and Ordnance Officer, 1st Class, 8 December 1914. He served in the European War in France and Flanders; was appointed Director of Ordnance Services, East African Expeditionary Force, in January 1916. He was created a CMG in 1917, and a CB in 1919. General Scott married, 24 June 1899, at Romsey, Hampshire, Edith Ferris Mortimer, second daughter of Major E F W Mortimer, of Romsey, and they had two children: Edith Muriel Kellock, and John Mortimer Kellock, born 12 October 1906.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
ScottWCaptainSCOTT, William, Captain. He was born 5 Jul 1858 in Scotland and moved to South Africa in 1881. He worked for the Swaziland Government 1 Oct 1890 to Sep 1899 and was JP for Swaziland 1889-99. After the siege he joined Damant's Horse as Captain and Officer Commanding, B Squadron. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "W Scott, Captain, Damant's Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". MID 8 Mar 1902. He received the Queen's Medal with six clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps. He served in the Provisional Swaziland Administration in 1903 and rejoined as Farrier Sergeant, Natal Mounted Rifles for the Zulu Rebellion of 1906. He was Captain, Natal Mounted Rifles 1 Jul 1910 and he died in Swaziland 23 Jan 1923.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Damant's Horse
Scott-KerrRobertMajorSCOTT-KERR, ROBERT, Major, was born 8 November 1859, eldest son of William Scott-Kerr, of Sunlaws and Chatto, and of his second wife, I'jr.rces Louisa, daughter of Robert Fennessy. He was gazetted to the 24th Foot 26 March 1879, and became Second Lieutenant, Grenadier Guards, 26 November 1879; served in the Zulu Campaign of 1879, and was present at the Battle of Ulundi (Medal with clasp). He became Lieutenant 1 July 1881, and served in the Sudan Expedition of 1885 (Suakin), receiving the Medal with clasp and the Bronze Star. He was promoted to Captain 16 December 1890, and to Major 19 September 1896. Major Scott-Kerr served in the South African War, 1900-2, and was present in operations in the Orange River Colony, April to May 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Biddulphsberg and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in the Transvaal, February to March 1901. operations in Orange River Colony, December 1900 to February 1901, and March 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Robert Scott-Kerr, Major, Grenadier Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to Lord Kitchener in South Africa, and were presented by Brigadier General E O F Hamilton at Heilbron 12 March 1902. He became Lieutenant Colonel 14 February 1904; was given the Brevet of Colonel 14 February 1907; became Colonel 7 November 1908. Colonel Scott-Kerr commanded the Grenadier Guards and Regimental District 30 July 1910 to 29 July 1914. At the beginning of the war (from 5 August 1914), he commanded the 4th (Guards') Brigade, BEF, and he was severely wounded during the Retreat from Mons. Lord Ernest Hamilton, in 'The First Seven Divisions' (published by Messrs Hutchinson), says on pages 76 and 77 that at Villers-Cotterets "we were again forced into a rearguard action. At nine o'clock the 4th (Guards') Brigade, which was acting rearguard, was overtaken at Soucy, where—in accordance with orders—it had faced about while the 2nd Division was having a two hours' halt for rest and dinner. It was no case of surprise, the brigade being thoroughly prepared, and, indeed, expecting to have to hold the enemy in check. Dispositions were therefore made accordingly. The 2nd Grenadiers and 3rd Coldstream held the ground from Montgobert to Soucy, with the Coldstream lining the long grass ride that runs through the woods at Haramont. They were supported by two batteries of the 41st Brigade, RFA The 2nd Coldstream and Irish Guards were posted in rear of the first line along the northern edge of the Foret de Villers-Cotterets, at the base of the ridge known as the Rond de la Reine. The enemy commenced by shelling the front line, and shelling it with such accuracy that General Scott-Kerr ordered the Grenadiers and 3rd Coldstream to fall back through the second line, and take up a position in rear. This was done, but subsequently these two battalions were brought up into line with the Irish Guards along the northern edge of the wood, whilst the 2nd Coldstream were sent back to take up a covering position in rear of the wood, along the railway east and west of Villers-Cotterets Halte. Such was the position without much change up to midday, when the enemy's attack began to slacken, and shortly afterwards they appeared to have had enough of it, and drew off. The 4th Brigade thereupon resumed its march as far as Thury, which was reached about 10.30 pm Their casualties in this action amounted to over 300. The Irish Guards in this action had Colonel the Honourable G Morris and Lieutenant Tisdall killed; Major Crichton and Lord Castlerosse wounded. In the Grenadiers the Honourable J Manners and Lieutenant McDougall were killed, and in the Coldstream, Lieutenant G Lambton was killed and Captain Burton and Captain Tritton wounded. The Brigadier General Scott-Kerr was himself badly wounded in the thigh, and the command of the brigade was taken over by Colonel Corry". Brigadier General Scott-Kerr commanded a brigade, Central Force, Home Defence, from 2 January 1915 to 26 March 1915; he was commander (graded AAG), 10th and 11th Divisions, New Armies, 15 October 1915 to 7 December 1915; and Brigade Commander, 191st Infantry Brigade, Home Forces, 8 December 1915 to 14 January 1918. He was created a CB in 1914, and a CMG in 1919; was mentioned in Despatches twice, and was awarded the Mons Star.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Grenadier Guards
ScratchleyVictor Henry SylvesterCaptainSCRATCHLEY, VICTOR HENRY SYLVESTER, Captain, was born 6 July 1870. He entered the Army 25 March 1891; served in the Isazai Expedition, 1892, and in the Chitral Campaign, 1895 (Medal with clasp); became Captain 22 October 1899. He served in the South African War from 1899 to 1900; during operations in Natal, 1899; also in the operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; and received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Victor Henry Sylvester Scratchley, Captain, King's Royal Rifle Corps. In recognition of services in the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 17 December 1901. Captain Scratchley was Superintendent of Gymnasia, 1901 to 1904; retired from the KRRC 20 June 1906, and joined the Reserve of Officers. He served during the European War as Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, and was created OBE. In 1901 he married Anna Clementine, daughter of John Harvey, of Mayfield, Shooter's Hill, Kent.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Royal Rifle Corps
SeccombeArchibald KennedyMajorSECCOMBE, ARCHIBALD KENNEDY, Major, was born 22 March 1868. He was commissioned in the Norfolk Regiment 30 January 1889; served in the Nile Expedition, 1898 (4th Class Medjidie; Medal; Egyptian Medal) and transferred to the Army Service Corps 15 May 1890, becoming Lieutenant 14 May 1891, and Captain 18 April 1894. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as DAAG, 6 April 1901 to 30 October 1902. He took part in the operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Reitfontein and Lombard's Kop; at the Defence of Ladysmith, including sorties of 7 and 10 December 1899, and action of 6 January 1900; during the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; in Natal (March to June 1900), including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September); again in the Transvaal, November 1900 to April 1901; afterwards on Staff; also in Cape Colony, April, to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901 (Sir G S White, 23 March 1900; Sir R H Buller, 9 November 1900), and London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was given the Brevet, of Major, 29 November 1900, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 20 June 1902]: "Archibald Kennedy Seccombe, Major, Army Service Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Major 1 January 1901; Lieutenant Colonel 1 August 1910, and Colonel 16 December 1913. He served in the European War 1914-18 as Deputy Director of Supplies, BEF and British Armies in France from 13 May 1915; as Temporary Brigadier General from 5 April 1918. He was created a CMG in 1916 and a CB in 1919. Colonel Seccombe was married, and his wife, Mrs Julia Seccombe, died in 1915.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Army Service Corps
SeckhamBassett ThorneMajorSECKHAM, BASSETT THORNE, Major, was born 22 November 1863, eldest son of Samuel Lipscomb Seckham, JP, DL, and of Kinbarra Swene Seckham. He was educated at Charterhouse, and joined the 4th Royal Welsh Fusiliers 18 January 1882, becoming Captain, 4th South Staffordshire Regiment, 31 May 1886, and Major 4 February 1899. He served in the South African Campaign, 1900-1; was present at actions of Lindley, Bethlehem and Winburg; OC Infantry, with a column under Lord Methuen, at Kimberley, Barkly West, Likatleng and Dronfield, March 1900. He took part in the operations which ended in the surrender of Prinsloo and 4,000 men. He was mentioned in Despatches; awarded the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Bassett Thorne Seckham, Major, 4th Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901; the warrant sent 24 January 1902. He was Lieutenant Colonel commanding 13 December 1905 to 1910; was given the honorary rank of Colonel 2 August 1908; retired 13 December 1910. On the outbreak of the European War he offered his services as Major, and was attached for duty to the 4th South Staffordshire Regiment September 1914, and served with them and other battalions of the regiment until 8 March 1919; coast defences and recruit training. Colonel Seckham was Justice of the Peace, Staffordshire. He married, in 1888, Alice Dorothy, daughter of W F Moore, of Cronkbourne, Douglas, and they had one son, Lionel Bassett Lipscomb, born on 17 June 1891, and two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South Staffordshire Regiment
SeelyJohn Edward BernardCaptainSEELY, JOHN EDWARD BERNARD, Captain, was born 31 May 1868, youngest son of Sir Charles Seely, 1st Baronet, and Emily, daughter of William Evans and sister of Sir F Evans, 1st Baronet. He was educated at Harrow, and at Trinity College, Cambridge, and was called to the Bar, Inner Temple, in 1897. He served in the South African War, 1900, taking part in operations in Orange Free State, April and May 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Biddulphsberg and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in Cape Colony, March 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "John Edward Bernard Seely, Captain, 4th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He became Lieutenant Colonel Commanding the Hampshire Carabineers and retired. Colonel J E B Seely served in the European War, 1914-18; was five times mentioned in Despatches; created a CB in 1916, and a CMG in 1918, and promoted Major General in 1918. In 1891 he was awarded a gold medal by the French Government for saving life at sea. General Seely was MP for the Isle of Wight, 1900-6; MP (L) Abercromby Division of Liverpool, 1906 to 1910; MP (L), Ilkeston Division, Derby, from 1910; Under Secretary for the Colonies, 1908-10; was made a PC in 1909; Under Secretary of State for War, 1911; Secretary of State for War, 1912-14; Parliamentary Under Secretary, Ministry of Munitions and Deputy Minister of Munitions, 1918; Under Secretary of State for Air and President of Air Council, January 1918. He married (1st), in 1895, Emily Florence (who died in 1913), daughter of Colonel the Honourable Sir H G L Crichton, and they had two sons and four daughters. General Seely married (secondly) The Honourable Mrs Nicholson, youngest daughter of the 1st Viscount Elibank.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
4th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
SegraveO'NealMajorSEGRAVE, O'NEAL, Major, of Cabra, was born 31 December 1856, son of Captain Henry Segrave, JP, DL, of Kiltymon, County Wicklow; Cabra, County Dublin, and Calla, County Galway. He was educated in Belgium, and joined the Colonial Forces in 1876. He served in South Africa, 1877-8-9 (Medal and clasp); the Basuto War, 1880-1 (Medal and clasp); the Transvaal War, 1900-2; was mentioned in Despatches; awarded the Queen's Medal with four clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "O'Neal Segrave, Major, 18th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in-South Africa". He served in the Great War, as Draft Conducting Officer, May 1915 to June 1917; as Town Major and Area Commandant at Brisleux-au-Mont, France, June 1917 to February 1918; as OC, VI Corps Employment Company and Commandant, VI Corps Troops, from 1 March 1918. He received the Mons Star, Victory Medal and Allied Medal. He married, in 1882, Beatrix, elder daughter of Captain W J J Warneford, and had two sons: Captain O'Neal Segrave, who served in the Royal Irish Regiment, and Captain H J Segrave, who served in the Wiltshire Regiment and was attached to the RAF.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
18th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
Page 47 of 59
<<First <Prev 45 4647 48 49 Next> Last>>