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(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
SmythRobert NapierCaptainSMYTH, ROBERT NAPIER, Brevet Major, was born 26 June 1868, son of General J H Smyth, CB, of Frimhurst. He was educated at Wellington, and joined the 21st Hussars 12 February 1890, as Second Lieutenant, becoming Lieutenant, 21st Lancers, 6 November 1892. He served with the Nile Expedition, 1898; was present at the Battle of Khartoum, and was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898], receiving the Medal and the Egyptian Medal and clasp. He was ADC to the GOC, Scottish District, 12 August 1896 to 20 January 1898, and was promoted to Captain 9 October 1899. Captain Smyth served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as DAAG (Intelligence), South Africa, 13 November 1900 to 2 October 1902. He was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; during the operations on Tugela Heights (17 to 26 February) and action at Pieter's Hill; in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Ileit Vlei, Belfast (26 and 27 August), Lydenberg (5 to 8 September) and Rhenoster Kop; again in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901 (Sir R H Buller, 30 March and 9 November 1900), and London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]. He was given the Brevet of Major 29 November 1900; the Queen's Medal with four clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Robert Napier Smyth, Captain and Brevet Major, 21st Lancers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was employed with the South African Constabulary 20 December 1902 to 28 February 1905; became Major 9 December 1905; Lieutenant Colonel 7 September 1910, and Colonel 16 December 1913. He served in the European War, as GSO2, 2nd Cavalry Division, British Expeditionary Force, 19 September to 9 October 1914; was GSO2, GHQ, BEF, 10 October 1914 to 4 January 1915; Commanded the North Midland Reserve Mounted Brigade, Home Forces, 12 January 1915 to 10 January 1917; commanded a Brigade 11 January 1917 to 21 March 1919; commanded the 7th Cyclist Brigade, Forces in Great Britain, 26 May 1919. He was created a CBE in 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
21st Lancers
SoamesAlfredLieutenantSOAMES, ALFRED, Lieutenant, was born 16 September 1862, son of Reverend Charles Soames, MA, of Mildenhall, Marlborough, Wiltshire. He served in the South African War in 1901. He received the Queen's Medal with a clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette 31 October 1902]: "Alfred Soames, Lieutenant, South African Mounted Irregular Forces. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Lieutenant Soames served in the Great War with the 6th Battalion East Kent Regiment (The Buffs), and was killed in action 13 October 1915.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
SAMIF
Solly-FloodArthurCaptainSOLLY-FLOOD, ARTHUR, Captain, was born 28 January 1871, son of Major General Sir F R Solly-Flood, KCB (of Slaney Lodge, Wexford, and of Porthmawr, Crickhowell, South Wales), and of Constance Eliza, eldest daughter of W E Frere. He joined the South Lancashire Regiment as Second Lieutenant 25 March 1891; became Lieutenant 12 January 1894; was Adjutant, South Lancashire Regiment, 24 April 1895 to 23 April 1899; was promoted Captain 28 February 1900; served in South Africa during the Boer War on Special Service from 20October 1899 to 18 January 1902; as Adjutant, South African Light Horse, December 1899 to January 1901; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; during operations of 5 to 7 February 1900; action at Vaal Kranz; during operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900) and action at Pieter's Hill; during operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); during operations in the Transvaal in June 1900, also during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September); operations in Orange River Colony, June 1900. He also served during the operations in the Transvaal 30 November to December 1900; during operations in Orange River Colony, December 1900, and February 1901 to January 1902; during operations in Cape Colony, December 1900 to February 1901; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Arthur Solly-Flood, Captain, South Lancashire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to South Africa, and presented there. He was appointed Staff Captain, HQ of Army, 3 August 1904 to 14 October 1906; was DAQMG, HQ of Army, and GSO, 2nd Grade, HQ of Army, 15 October 1906 to 2 August 1908; Major, 4th Dragoon Guards, 19 August 1908; GSO, 2nd Grade, Egypt, 26 February 1910 to 30 October 1912. He served in the European War, 1914-18; as Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, 4th Dragoon Guards, 10 November 1914 to 2 November 1915; Temporary Brigadier General 2 November 1915; served in France on the General Staff of Sir Douglas Haig, as Director of Training in France, 28 January 1917 to 6 October 1918 (Despatches; created a CMG 1915); promoted Temporary Major General to command 42nd East Lancashire Division, October 1917. For his services in the European War he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 17 February 1915, 15 June 1916, 4 January and 11 December 1917, 20 May and 20 December 1918]; was given the Brevets of Lieutenant Colonel 18 February 1915, and Colonel 1 January 1917; promoted to Major General 3 June 1919; created a CB [London Gazette, 1 January 1919]; a CMG [London Gazette, 3 June 1916], and awarded the Ordre de la Couronne Commandeur 26 July 1917, and the Belgian Croix de Guerre 11 March 1918. Major General Solly-Flood married, in 1916, Elise Martin, only daughter of Ferdinand Haiibury, JP, of Nantoer, Abergavenny, Monmouthshire.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince of Wales's Volunteers) South Lancashire Re
SowerbyHarry JohnCaptainSOWERBY, HARRY JOHN, Major, was born in 1867, second son of Colonel George Sowerby, of Putteridge, Bury, Herts; Dalston Hall, Carlisle, and Dalton Hall, Richmond, Yorkshire. He was educated at Elstree and Harrow, and served in South Africa, 1900-1, as Commandant, Liewspruit, taking part in operations in the Orange Free State, April, and May 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900; operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to May 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Harry John Sowerby, Captain and Honorary Major, 3rd Durham Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He became Lieutenant Colonel and Honorary Colonel and commanded the 3rd Battalion Durham Light Infantry, 1907-12. He received the Coronation Medal in 1911. Colonel Sowerby married, in 1912, Katharine Jane, daughter of Reverend Arthur Coles Haviland, MA, Rector of Lilley, Herts, and they had two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Durham Light Infantry
SpeddingCharles RodneyLieutenantSPEDDING, CHARLES RODNEY, Lieutenant, was born 25 April 1871, son of Benjamin H Spedding, MD, of Bangor, County Down. He was commissioned in the Royal Irish Rifles 23 December 1893, becoming Lieutenant 6 October 1896. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as Station Staff Officer; as Adjutant, 9th Battalion Mounted Infantry, 28 December 1900 to 25 April 1901; as Staff Officer to General Bruce Hamilton's Column of Mounted Infantry, 1901-2. He was present at operations in Orange Free State, March to May 1909; operations in Orange River Colony, May to November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900; operations in the Transvaal, April 1901 to 31 May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, 30 November 1900 to April 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Charles Rodney Spedding, Lieutenant, Royal Irish Rifles. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. He was promoted to Captain 1 March 1902; was ADC to Major General, Infantry Brigade, Malta, 16 June 1906; commanded the 5th Regiment Mounted Infantry, Harrismith, South Africa, 1912. Major Spedding married, in 1907, Constance Mildred Edith, daughter of Lieutenant Colonel T G Cutbell, late 13th Hussars, and they had two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Irish Rifles
SpryLeighton HumeCaptainSPRY, LEIGHTON HUME, Captain, was born 14 January 1871, eldest son of Arthur Hume Spry, Indian Civil Service. He was gazetted to the West Yorkshire Regiment as Second Lieutenant, from the Militia, 12 March 1892; became Lieutenant 22 November 1893; served in the Ashanti Expedition, 1895-96, for which he received the Ashanti Star, and was promoted to Captain 24 February 1900. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as ADC to Major General, Infantry Brigade, 10 April to 23 August 1900, and as Staff Officer to Mobile Column 24 August 1900 to 19 June 1902, taking part in the operations in Natal, 1899; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; during operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; in the operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900) and action at Pieter's Hill (slightly wounded). He took part during operations in Natal (March to June 1900), including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to October 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September); served during operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902; was again severely wounded 19 December 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901 (Sir R H Buller, 30 March 13 September and 9 November 1900), and London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Leighton Hume Spry, Captain, West Yorkshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was Brigade Major, India, 6 June 1907 to 26 October 1909; was DAAG, India, 27 October 1909 to 5 June 1911; promoted to Major 23 February 1912; GSO, 2nd Grade, Northumbrian Division, Northern Command, 16 March 1912 to 4 August 1914. On the outbreak of the European War he was GSO, 1st Grade, 5 August 1914 to 9 May 1915, and AA and QMG, 30th Division, BEF, 13 September 1915 to 9 April 1916, and Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, West Yorkshire Regiment, 10 May 1916. He married, in 1894, Emily, youngest daughter of W Peacock-Edwards.
DSO, Ashanti Star (Lt, W Yorks Regt), QSA (6) T-H RofL L-N Belf OFS CC (Capt, WYR), KSA (2) (Capt, DSO, RWY), 1914-15 Star (Lt Col, DSO), BWM, Victory Medal (Lt Col). Spink 1998 est £1,400-1,600.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince of Wales's Own) West Yorkshire Regiment
StacpooleGeorge William RobertLieutenantSTACPOOLE, GEORGE WILLIAM ROBERT, Lieutenant, was born at Eden Vale, Ennis, County Clare, Ireland, 27 May 1872, son of Richard Stacpoole and of a daughter of John Massy Westropp, of Athyflin, County Limerick. He was educated at St Columba's College, and Cheltenham College, and joined the Clare Artillery 1 April 1890, and the South Staffordshire Regiment 19 October 1892. He served in the South African War from December 1899 to August 1901, on the Staff; as Adjutant, Mounted Infantry, and Second-in-Command of Montmorency's Scouts. He served on the Staff (as Station and Railway Staff Officer, graded Staff Lieutenant) 10 December 1899 to 4 March 1900; as Station Staff Officer at De Aar 18 November 1900 to February 1901 (slightly wounded; horse shot). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "George William Robert Stacpoole, Lieutenant, South Staffordshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He became Captain, January 1901, and retired in December 1907. In the European War he served as Assistant Provost-Marshal, No 1 Base, on Mobilization; Assistant Provost-Marshal, 2nd Division, February to December 1915; Assistant Provost-Marshal, 5th Corps, to October 1918; Deputy Provost-Marshal, Lines of Communication Area, to Demobilization, 20 April 1919. Lieutenant Colonel Stacpoole was four times mentioned in Despatches in the European War, and created a Chevalier de l'Ordre de Leopold by the King of Belgium, for services in the Ypres Salient; also received the Belgian Croix de Guerre; created OBE, New Year's Honours List, 1919. The Insignia were presented by the King 10 July 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South Staffordshire Regiment
StairsHenry BertramCaptainSTAIRS, HENRY BERTRAM, Captain, was born 29 April 1871, son of John Stairs, of Halifax, Nova Scotia. He became a Barrister, Supreme Court, Nova Scotia, in 1893, and a KC in 1910. He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, and was present at operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg, 18 to 26 February; actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900,; including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria; operations in Orange j River Colony, June 1900; operations in Orange River Colony and Transvaal, east and west of Pretoria, July to October 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; was given the Brevet of Major; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Henry Bertram Stairs, Captain, Canadian Contingent. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia of the DSO were presented to him by the Governor at Halifax, 10 May 1902. Major Stairs had the Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal. He married, in 1903, Judith, daughter of George Henderson.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Canada contingent
StandfordWilliamLieutenant ColonelSTANDFORD, WILLIAM, Lieutenant Colonel, served in the South African War of 1877-78, in the Gaika and Galeka campaigns (Medal with clasp); in the operations in the Transkei, 1880-81 (Medal with clasp); and in the South African War of 1899-1902, as Adjutant of the Duke of Connaught and Strathearn's Own Cape Town Highlanders, October 1899 to 31 December 1900; and in command of them 1 January 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was Assistant Staff Officer, Colonial Forces, and afterwards Staff Officer to the Commandant of the Cape Colonial Volunteers; took part in operations in Cape Colony. Lieutenant Colonel Standford was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with a clasp, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "William Standford, Lieutenant Colonel, Cape Town Highlanders. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". In 1911 Colonel Standford was created an MVO
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Cape Town Highlanders
StanleyFerdinand CharlesCaptainSTANLEY, THE HONOURABLE FERDINAND CHARLES, Captain, was born 28 January 1871, fourth son of the 16th Earl of Derby and Lady Constance Villiers, eldest daughter of the 4th Earl of Clarendon, KG. He was educated at Wellington and Sandhurst; joined the King's Royal Rifle Corps 10 October 1891; was ADC (extra) to the Viceroy of Ireland 11 February 1896 to 31 December 1896; served in the Nile Expedition, 1898. taking part in the Battle of Khartoum (received the Egyptian Medal with clasp and the Medal); became Lieutenant, Grenadier Guards, 30 July 1897, and Captain. He served in the South African War, 1899 to 1902, with the 4th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry, and was on the Staff (as Camp Commandant) at Headquarters from 29 November 1900. He was present at operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including the actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "The Honourable Ferdinand Charles Stanley, Captain, Grenadier Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 24 October 1902. Captain Stanley retired from the Grenadier Guards and entered the Reserve of Officers. He served in the European War from 1914 to 1918; was given the Brevets of Major and Lieutenant Colonel; was Temporary Brigadier General, commanding the 89th Infantry Brigade. He was mentioned in Despatches; was created a CMG in 1918, and made a Commander of the Legion of Honour. He was Vice Chairman, Associated Portland Cement Company; Chairman, British Portland Cement Company; Director, Forestal Land Company; Director, Birmingham Carriage and Wagon Company; Member, National Hunt Steeplechase Association. He married, in 1904, the Honourable Alexandra Fellowes, daughter of the 2nd Baron de Ramsey and Lady Rosamond Jane Frances Spencer-Churchill, daughter of the 7th Duke of Marlborough, KG, and they had three sons. He died 17 Mar 1935.
CMG, DSO, Queens Sudan (Lt, 1/GGds), QSA (3) CC OFS Joh (Capt, DSO, G Gds), KSA (2) (Capt, DSO, G Gds), 1914-15 Star, BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Brig-Gen), Khedives Sudan (1) Khartoum (G Gds), Legion d'Honneur (France) 3rd Class. Spink 1975 £350, Lusted 1978 £900. Christies 1985 £980.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Grenadier Guards
StansfeldJohn Raymond EvelynLieutenantSTANSFELD, JOHN RAYMOND EVELYN, Lieutenant, was born 20 April 1880, the only son of John Birbeck Evelyn Stansfeld, MA. He was educated at Uppingham and Sandhurst; gained the Sword of Honour in 1897, and was gazetted to the Gordon Highlanders 18 April 1899; served in the South African War from 1899-1902, first as Railway Staff Officer, being promoted to Lieutenant 25 February 1900. He took part in the operations in Natal in 1899; Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso; in the operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and the action at Spion Kop; the operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; Tugela Heights 14-27 February 1900, and Pieter's Hill; was in the fighting in Natal, March to June 1900, including the action at Laing's Nek 6-9 June; in the Transvaal operations, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; Belfast 26 and 27 August and Lydenberg 5 to 8 September; in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to November 1900; in the Transvaal operations, November 1900 to September 1901, and November-December 1901, and in the operations in Orange River Colony, September to November 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches by Sir R H Buller, 3 February and 30 March 1901; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and for his conduct in attending the wounded under fire at Spion Kop was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "John Raymond Evelyn Stansfeld, Lieutenant, Gordon Highlanders. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented by the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 August 1901. He was heavy-weight boxing champion in the Army Boxing in 1903, at Aldershot; became Captain 30 May 1904; was Adjutant to the 5th Gordon Highlanders (Territorial Force) from 26 August 1904 to 1909. He served with the 2nd Gordon Highlanders in India and Egypt, 1910-14; was at the Delhi Durbar, 1911, where he organized the Boxing Tournament. He received the Durbar Medal. He served in the Great War, leaving England with the 2nd Gordon Highlanders on 4 October 1914, and landed in Belgium with the 7th Division; was wounded in the First Battle of Ypres, November 1914, and at Neuve Chapelle on 13 March 1915. He was promoted Brevet Major, January 1915; was appointed to command his battalion, May 1915; was gazetted Lieutenant Colonel 23 June 1915; was thrice mentioned in Despatches. He was mortally wounded at Loos 25 September 1915, while leading his battalion into action. He continued to command and direct after he was wounded, until he was taken to the dressing station some hours later. He died on 28 September at Cheques, and his body was buried in the Military Cemetery at that place. He was awarded the 1914 Star. In April 1904, Captain Stansfeld married Constance Yolande, eIdest daughter of Major General Le Marquis de Bourbel de Mompinçon, RE, and had one son, John de Bourbel Stansfeld, born 22 February 1905.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Gordon Highlanders
StansfeldThomas WolricheLieutenantSTANSFELD, THOMAS WOLRICHE, Lieutenant, was born 30 June 1877, youngest son of T W Stansfeld, Westwood Grove, Leeds. He was educated at Winchester, and joined Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own Yorkshire Regiment, from the Militia, 24 March 1897; was promoted Lieutenant 15 December 1898. He saw active service in South Africa, employed with the Mounted Infantry, 1899 to 1902, being present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February), and actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August); operations in Cape Colony, and south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including actions at Colesberg (1 January to 12 February); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to April 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Thomas Wolriche Stansfeld, Lieutenant, West Yorkshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 2 June 1902. He was transferred to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, becoming Captain 19 February 1902, and served as an Adjutant of Mounted Infantry in South Africa from June 1906 to June 1909, rejoining the Yorkshire Regiment 8 January 1908, and subsequently serving as a Special Reserve Adjutant, October 1910, for three years. He was given his Majority 30 October 1914. He saw active service in the European War, commanding battalions of the Yorkshire Regiment until June 1916. He became Brevet Lieutenant Colonel 3 June 1916, and in the following October Temporary Colonel, retaining this position until appointed to the command of the 178th Infantry Brigade 6 April 1917. For his services Brigadier General Stansfeld was mentioned in Despatches; was made a CMG in 1918, and was awarded the Legion of Honour and the French Croix de Guerre, with (3 June 1919) the Brevet of Colonel. He had the 1914 Star. He married, in 1903, Ethel, daughter of William Hebden, of Scarborough, and they had two sons.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince of Wales's Own) West Yorkshire Regiment
StapletonJohn HenryLieutenantSTAPLETON, JOHN HENRY, Lieutenant, was born in 1866. He served in the South African War, as Lieutenant in the South Australian Mounted Infantry, 1899-1900, and was present at operations in the Transvaal, 1900, including actions at Diamond Hill. Operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, including action at Belfast. Operations in Orange River Colony and Cape Colony. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "John Henry Stapleton, Lieutenant, South Australian Mounted Infantry. For services in the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were forwarded to Australia, and presented in Adelaide. He was placed on the Reserve of Officers 21 August 1911; awarded the Volunteers' Decoration.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South Australia contingent
StaughtonS TLieutenantSTAUGHTON, S T, Lieutenant, was born at Eynesbury, Melton, Victoria, Australia, 30 December 1876, son of S T Staughton, MLA, Victoria. He was educated at the Church of England Grammar School, Melbourne, and was a member of the Victorian Contingent to England at Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee. He was commissioned in 1898 in the Victorian Mounted Rifles, and proceeded to South Africa as Lieutenant in the 1st Victorian Contingent in 1899. He was three times mentioned in Despatches, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "S T Staughton, Lieutenant, Victorian Mounted Rifles. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to South Africa, forwarded to Australia; returned to South Africa again, and presented there 3 September 1903. He was promoted to Captain, 1900, and in that year returned with the 1st Contingent to Victoria. Captain Staughton commanded the Victorian returned South African troops in Sydney during the Commonwealth celebrations. Captain Staughton was a Grazier; His favourite recreations were polo, hunting, rowing, cricket and shooting. He married, in 1902, Tassie Mary, daughter of the Honourable Howard Spensley.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Victoria contingent
SteelJ ELieutenantSTEEL, J E, Lieutenant, served in the South African War in 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches; awarded the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "J E Steel, Lieutenant, South African Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South African Light Horse
SteinaeckerFrancis Christian LudwigMajorSTEINAECKER, BARON, FRANCIS CHRISTIAN LUDWIG, Major, was born in Berlin 28 September 1854, son of Francis L Baron von Steinaecker, Colonel, German Guards, and the Baroness von Steinaecker, (nee Baroness von Thumen). He was educated in the Royal Cadet Corps at Waklstatt and Berlin, and entered the German Army (Leib Grenadiers) in the early seventies. He resigned his commission in 1879, and went to Bulgaria with Prince Alexander of Battenberg. During the Bulgarian Revolution of 1880 he had a command at Plevna, and he resigned about 1885. He led the expedition into the interior of German South-West Africa; returned in 1888, and came out to Pondoland in 1889. He settled in Natal in 1890; was President of the Political Association of this district; joined the British Forces (Colonial Scouts) on the outbreak of the South African War, 1899-1902, on 1 November 1899, as a Trooper. He left Maritzburg at the beginning of March 1900 to break, with a small patrol, the enemy's communication on the Delagoa Line; rode through Natal, Zululand, Tongaland and Swaziland; lost all his horses; smashed Malalene Bridge on the Delagoa Line on the 17th June 1900, and took the Commandant of that line—Van Dam—prisoner. He recruited some British refugees from Portuguese territory, and, by activity of movement, drew considerable numbers of the enemy from the real theatre of war (Dalmanutha). In order to protect the railway between Campmunden and the border, he raised Steinaecker's Horse, in the enemy's country, without base to draw from, without transport or provisions. He landed stores and men at Koxi Bay from HM Gunboat (Captain Gurney); was given command by Lord Kitchener of the Border and adjacent lowland country (Swaziland north to Letruba River). He received the Queen's Medal with four claaps, and the King's Medal with two; was mentioned in Despatches, and given the British decoration of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Francis Christian Ludwig Steinaecker, Major, Steinaecker's Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented publicly by General Lyttelton. Baron von Steinaecker was sent to Netley in April 1902. He attended the Coronation of King Edward at the head of a contingent of his own regiment (Steinaecker's Horse) by direct orders from Lord Roberts, but could never get the Coronation Medal (in spite of official document in hand). He was pronounced medically unfit for further service by Medical Board, London, in July 1902; "received honorary rank of Lieutenant Colonel", he remarks, "probably in lieu of pension. Now destitute after ... years of the most ghastly climate South Africa can produce". Baron von Steinaecker married, in 1881, the daughter of Geheimer Ober-Regierungs Rath Kegler, of Berlin. Sir A Conan Doyle tells us in 'The Great Boer War', in the chapter on 'The Advance to Komatipoort', how "Colonel Steinaecker, an ex-officer of the German Imperial Army, with an irregular force of 600 men, had been operating upon the Boer line of communications in the same way as De Wet had on the British, though their operations were necessarily on a smaller scale. The whole romantic adventures of this small force, which passed through Zululand and Tongaland, and eventually made its way into Swaziland, after several times cutting the Boer railway and blowing up Malalene Bridge, are among the most curious and interesting incidents of the campaign. They captured the Boer officer in charge of the line of communication, and they gave work from first to last to a couple of thousand of the enemy, who had to guard the line from their constant descents. Some separate book will no doubt give a full account of the adventures of Steinaecker's Horse". Elsewhere, in describing how a small body of the South African Constabulary were outnumbered by the Boers, Sir A Conan Doyle says: "Another small reverse occurred at a far distant point of the seat of war, for the irregular corps known as Steinaecker's Horse was driven from its position at Bremersdorp in Swaziland upon 24 July and had to fall back sixteen miles, with a loss of ten casualties and thirty prisoners". Sir A Conan Doyle also says: "After the conclusion of Blood's movement in July several of his columns continued to clear the country, and to harass Viljeon in the Lydenburg and Dulstroom districts. Park, Kitchener, Spens, Beatson and Benson were all busy at this work, never succeeding in forcing more than a skirmish, but continually whittling away wagons, horses and men from that nucleus of resistance which the Boer leaders still held together. Though much hampered by the want of forage for their horses, the Boers were ever watchful for an opportunity to strike back, and the long list of minor successes gained by the British was occasionally interrupted by a petty reverse. Such a one befell the small body of South African Constabulary stationed near Vereeniging, who encountered, upon July 13, a strong force of Boers supposed to be the main commando of De Wet. The Constabulary behaved with great gallantry, but were hopelessly outnumbered, and lost their seven-pounder gun, four killed, six wounded and twenty-four prisoners ... Thus in the heart of a native state the two great white races-of South Africa were to be seen locked in a desperate conflict. However unavoidable, the sight was certainly one to be deplored"
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Steinaecker's Horse
StephenAlbert Alexander LeslieLieutenantSTEPHEN, ALBERT ALEXANDER LESLIE, Lieutenant, was born 3 February 1879, son of Major J Z Stephen and Augusta Henrietta Mary (nee Ricketts). He was educated at Eton, and joined the Scots Guards 4 January 1899, becoming Lieutenant 4 April 1900. He served in the South African War, in which he was present at a large number of engagements. He took part in the advance on Kimberley, with the action at Behnont, and was present at Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein, and also at the operations in the Orange Free State, Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, including actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet and Zand Rivers; the action near Johannesburg, those at Pretoria, Diamond Hill and Belfast. From January 1901, he was Assistant Provost-Marshal to Pulteney's Column, and he was Intelligence Officer to Garrett's Column in 1902. He was twice mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Albert Alexander Leslie Stephen, Lieutenant, Scots Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted Captain 10 April 1904, and from April 1906 to March 1909, was employed with the Macedonian Gendarmerie under the Foreign Office; from March 1909 to January 1911, with the Turkish Gendarmerie. He was awarded the Order of the Medjidie, 3rd Class, and in 1911 the Coronation Medal. From September 1910 to September 1913, he was an Adjutant of the Territorial Force, and in April 1914, was appointed Adjutant of the 1st Battalion of his own regiment. Captain Stephen served in the European War, and was killed in action on the 31st of October 1914, just 12 years to the day after his DSO was gazetted.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Scots Guards
StephensonEric SeymourLieutenantSTEPHENSON, ERIC SEYMOUR, Lieutenant, was born 21 April 1879, son of Ernest Percy Stephenson. He was educated at Eton, and served in South Africa with the Mounted Infantry, Brabant's Horse and the Gloucestershire Regiment, 1899-1902, taking part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including the defence of Wepener. Operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900. Operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July). Operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900. Operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River. Operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to February 1901. Operations in the Transvaal, April to August 1901, and November to December 1901. Operations in Orange River Colony, August to September 1901, and December 1901 to 31 May 1902. Operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in September and October 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Eric Seymour Stephenson, Lieutenant, Brabant's Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was gazetted 30 May 1900 to the Gloucestershire Regiment, from Brabant's Horse; he was promoted Lieutenant 14 February 1905, and employed on the Staff 12 April 1905, with the Egyptian Army. He served during the European War, and died of wounds received in action 6 March 1915, in the Dardanelles.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Brabant's Horse
StevensonEdward HallCaptainSTEVENSON, EDWARD HALL, Captain, was born 21 July 1872. He entered the Royal Artillery 18 January 1893; became Lieutenant 18 January 1896, and Captain 27 April 1900. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and took part in the advance on Kimberley, including action at Magersfontein; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg; actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Karee Siding, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900. He was severely wounded. He was present in the operations in Orange River Colony in July 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, February 1901 to January 1902. He was Staff Captain (Intelligence) 28 March to 5 August 1902. Captain Stevenson was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a, Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Edward Hall Stevenson, Captain, Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 18 December 1903. From 8 March 1905 to 8 September 1907, he was Adjutant, Royal Artillery; from 9 September 1907 to 15 January 1910, he was Garrison Adjutant, Eastern Command, and on 16 January 1910, he was promoted to Major. Major Stevenson served in the European War, 1914-18; became Lieutenant Colonel 9 October 1915, and was Temporary Brigadier General from 11 June to December 1917 (Brigadier General, Royal Artillery, 30th Division, British Armies in France, 11 June to 31 August 1917; Brigadier General, Royal Artillery, 29th Division, British Armies in France, 1 September 1917. He was wounded; was mentioned in Despatches; was given the Brevets of Lieutenant Colonel, and Colonel (3 June 1917), and created a CMG in 1918. Colonel Stevenson married, in 1917, Ethel Vaughan, widow of Leopold Hudson, FRCS
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
StevensonRobertCaptainSTEVENSON, ROBERT, Captain, was born in 1870. He served in South Africa with the New Zealand Contingent, 1900 to 1902, taking part in operations in the Orange Free State, April to May 1900; operations in the Transvaal, May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, October to 29 November 1900, including the action at Rhenoster Kop; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, March and April 1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 190J, to February 1901; April to July 1931; October 1901 to 31 May 1902; operations in the Orange River Colony, March 1901; July 1901, and August to October 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 7 May 1901, and 29 July 1902]; awarded the Queen's Medal with four clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Robert Stevenson, Captain, New Zealand Contingent. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
New Zealand contingent
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