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(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
ToogoodCecilCaptainTOOGOOD, CECIL, Captain, was born 31 March 1870, son of Captain A D Toogood, Bengal Fusiliers, and later Queen's Bodyguard. He was gazetted, 29 October 1890, Second Lieutenant, Border Regiment. He became Lieutenant 21 December 1892. He served during the Waziristan Expedition, 1894-95; became Captain, Manchester Regiment, 26 May 1900. He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, on the Staff, afterwards employed with the Mounted Infantry; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith; during the operations in the Transvaal October to December 1901, and February to April 1902; in the operations in Orange River Colony, December 1901 to February 1902; during operations in Cape Colony in September to October 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches (Sir R H Buller, 30 March and November 1900 [London Gazette, 8 February 1901, and 25 April 1902]). He received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Cecil Toogood, Captain, Manchester Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to South Africa, and presented there by the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 August 1901. He was Adjutant, Volunteers, 3 January 1904 to 31 October 1907, and Regimental Staff Officer 13 December 1907; was promoted to Captain, Lincolnshire Regiment, 18 January 1908; Recruiting Staff Officer, Sheffield Recruiting Area, 3 December 1907 to 4 May 1911; Recruiting Staff Officer, Belfast Recruiting Area, 5 May 1911 to 31 March 1912; promoted to Major 15 May 1914; Adjutant, Officers' Training Corps, 23 May to 4 August 1914. He served in the European War from 1914, commanding the 2nd Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment; was mentioned in Despatches, and promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 11 March 1918. He married, in 1899, Mary Elizabeth, eldest daughter of General Henry Pipon, CB, and Louisa Anne, daughter of Admiral Sir William Edmonstone, 4th Baronet, CB, of Duntreath, Stirlingshire, Scotland.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Manchester Regiment
ToppingThomas EdwardLieutenantTOPPING, THOMAS EDWARD, Lieutenant, served in the South African War from 1900 to 1901, with the Imperial Yeomanry; was present in operations in the Orange River Colony, including actions at Lindley (1 June) and Rhenoster River; operations in the Transvaal, including actions at Elands River and Frederickstad; operations in Cape Colony, Orange River Colony and the Transvaal, 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Thomas Edward Topping, Lieutenant, 15th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 17 December 1901. He also received the Queen's Medal with four clasps. He again saw active service in the European War from 1914 to 1918, and was made a CMG in 1917, and a CB in 1919. He was Major and Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, 2nd West Lancashire Brigade, Royal Field Artillery (Territorials); Honorary Captain in the Army.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
15th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
TottenhamCharles BosvileCaptainTOTTENHAM, CHARLES BOSVILE, Captain, was born 19 October 1869, at 57 Belgrave Road, London, elder son of Colonel Charles George Tottenham, of Ballycurry, County Wicklow, late of the Scots Fusilier Guards, and formerly Member of Parliament for New Ross, Wexford, and Catherine Elizabeth (who died in 1905), daughter of the Honourable and Reverend Sir F Stapleton, 7th Baronet, of Gray's Court, and granddaughter of the 22nd Lord Despencer. He was educated at Eton and Sandhurst, and joined the Scots Guards 29 October 1890, and was transferred a few months later to the 14th Hussars (14 January 1891). He became Lieutenant 23 November 1892, and Captain 16 April 1900. Captain Tottenham served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at, Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 1900, and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Houtnek (Thoba Mountain) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Belfast, (26 and 27 August); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to January 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, February to 31 May 1902; operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in September and October 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with seven clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Charles Bosvile Tottenham, Captain, 14th Hussars. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was awarded the DSO for his successful command of the rear-guard when the column was retreating from Geluk, Transvaal, on 13 October 1900, when Colonel Brown-Synge Hutchinson (who is also in the 14th Hussars) won his VC. He was promoted to Major 14 January 1905. Major Tottenham was a noted rider, and won many regimental races. He married, in 1907, at Christ Church, Folkestone, Ruby, daughter of Mr and Mrs Piercy Benn. He left the Service in October 1910, owing to ill-health, and died on the 11th February 1911, at Mentone. (An obituary notice appeared in the 'Times' of 14 February 1911.)
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
14th (The King's) Hussars
TownleyNorman VincentLieutenantTOWNLEY, NORMAN VINCENT, Lieutenant, was born 4 March 1872, at Rockhampton, Queensland, son of Captain William Townley and of Gertrude Anne Townley (Burton). He was educated at the Brisbane Grammar School, and joined the Army in February 1900. He served in South Africa, 1900-2, with the Queensland Contingents, the 3rd Queensland Mounted Infantry and 5th Queensland Bushmen, and also with Doyle's Australian Scouts. He took part in operations in Rhodesia, April to 25 May 1900; the Relief of Mafeking; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Rhenoster Kop; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Eland's River (4 to 16 August); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, March 1902; operations in Cape Colony, February to March 1901. He was awarded the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "N V Townley, Lieutenant, Queensland Contingent. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Queensland contingent
TraversJoseph OatesCaptainTRAVERS, JOSEPH OATES, Captain, was born 19 May 1867, son of Colonel H F Travers and grandson of Major General Sir Robert Travers, KCB, KCMG. He was educated at Bradfield College. He entered the Devonshire Regiment 25 August 1886; served in Burma, 1891-92, in the Wuntho Expedition (Medal with clasp); became Captain 20 February 1895. He was present in the operations on the NW Frontier of India, 1897-98 (clasp), and in the Tirah Campaign, 1897-98, taking part in the capture of the Sampagha and Arhanga Passes. Captain Travers next saw active service in South Africa, 1899-1902, when he was present in operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Elandslaagte, Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop. He took part in the Defence of Ladysmith, including the sortie of 7 December 1899, and action of 6 January 1900; operations in Natal, March to January 1900; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenburg (5 to 8 September). He was employed with the Imperial Yeomanry 1 August to 19 December 1901, and served with the South African Constabulary 30 December 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Joseph Oates Travers, Captain, Devonshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to the GOC, Transvaal, 3 February 1903, and presented by the GOC, South Africa, at Pretoria, 5 March 1903. He became Major 22 November 1904, and Lieutenant Colonel 22 November 1912. Lieutenant Colonel Travers served in the European War from 1914. He was twice mentioned in Despatches; created a CMG, 1915, and promoted Colonel 22 November 1916; commanded the 199th Infantry Brigade, Home Forces, 20 May to 6 July 1916; commanded the 199th Brigade, Home Forces; British Armies in France, 7 July 1916 to 16 March 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Devonshire Regiment
TreebyHenry PaulMajorTREEBY, HENRY PAUL, Major, was born 30 August 1858, son of T W G Treeby, of Marmion House, Southsea, and Georgina Mary Anne, daughter of Reverend E A Gibson, Rector of Holybourne, Hants. He was educated at the Naval and Military College, Southsea, and privately, and entered the Army 6 August 1879; became Captain 5 August 1885. He was Adjutant, Volunteers, from 1 August 1893, and was promoted to Major 24 March 1890. Major Treeby served in the South African War, 1899-1900, and was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900; action at Vaal Kranz, and operations on Tugela Heights (severely wounded 23 February 1900). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Henry Paul Treeby, Major, East Surrey Regiment. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901; the Warrant sent 24 January 1902. Major Treeby retired 11 December 1901. He was Brigade Major, Wilts and Dorset Volunteer Brigade, 30 January 1903; Brigade Major, East Surrey Regt, 1 June 1906. He was appointed to command East Surrey Regimental Depot and 31st Regimental District Recruiting Area, 3 August 1914, with rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He was a JP for Surrey. He married Eliza, daughter of the, Reverend F Paynter, of Stoke Hill. Guildford, and they had one son and two daughters. Lieutenant Colonel Treeby was Joint Honourable Secretary Surrey County Prisoners of War Fund.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
East Surrey Regiment
TremeerCharles Arthur ClaudeMajorTREMEER, CHARLES ARTHUR CLAUDE, Major, was born in London 25 November 1856, son of Thomas Brockwell Tremeer, of Cornwall, and of Julie Chevret Tremeer. He was educated at Belgrave House School, London. He joined the Cape Frontier Mounted Police in June 1875; served in the Native Rebellion, in the Transkei, and in the Gaika and Galeka wars. In 1880 he was in command of the King William's Town Artillery in Umtata, and for his brilliant defence of that town was presented with a Sword of Honour. Lieutenant Colonel Tremeer served in the South African War, from 1899-1902, with the Mounted Irregular Forces; was Field Staff Officer on the Staff of Lord Roberts, and also of Lord Kitchener. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; awarded the Queen's and King's Medals with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Charles Arthur Claude Tremeer, Major, South African Mounted Forces. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". During the European War Lieutenant Colonel Tremeer served as DAQMG in the German South-West African Campaign, and was mentioned in Despatches. In 1886 he retired as Major from the King William's Town Artillery, and founded the firm of Tremeer & Cummings in 1887—the first firm in Johannesburg, and was the first President of the Johannesburg Chamber of Commerce. From 1892-1915 he was on the staff of the Farrar-Anglo-French group. He was also the Imperial Trade correspondent to HM Board of Trade till the time of his death. On 2 November 1918, Lieutenant Colonel Tremeer was knocked down by a motor-car in Johannesburg, and died a few hours later.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
SAMIF
TrenchFrederic John ArthurMajorTRENCH, FREDERIC JOHN ARTHUR, Major, was born 2 February 1857, son of Reverend J E Trench, MA. He was educated at Geneva University, at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and at the Staff College. He entered the Royal Artillery, as Lieutenant, 2 February 1876. He served in the Zulu War of 1879, and was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 21 August 1879], "for conduct especially deserving of commendation at the Battle of Ulundi", receiving also the Medal and clasp. He was promoted Captain 4 November 1884; was Adjutant, Royal Horse Artillery, 1883-84, and 1891-92; District Gunnery Instructor, 1889; became Major 19 January 1893; DAAG, Headquarters, Ireland, 18 October 1895 to 11 November 1898; Brigade Major, Royal Artillery, Western District, 10 April 1899 to 27 January 1901. He qualified as an Interpreter in French in 1899 (and in 1905 in German). Major Trench again saw active service in the South African War, being employed on the Staff as District Commandant 28 January 1901 to 28 April 1901; specially employed 29 April to 22 July 1901; DAAG 23 July 1901 to 1 March 1902; Press Censor, Headquarters, South Africa, 2 March to 2 July 1902. He was present in operations in the Transvaal, July 1901 to 31 May 1902; in Orange River Colony, July 1901; in Cape Colony, January 1901 to July 1901; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 17 June 1902], and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Frederic John Arthur Trench, Major, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes sent to the GOC, Gibraltar; presented at Gibraltar 24 November 1903. He became Lieutenant Colonel 1 October 1902; was given the Brevet of Colonel 1 October 1905; was attache to the German Forces in South-West Africa 13 May 1905 to 21 March 1906, from which he had the German Medal and three clasps; was mentioned in Despatches, and was male Commander of the Red Eagle with Swords and Diamonds, and was Military Attache at Berlin 22 March 1906 to 22 March 1910. All his German decorations were returned in 1914, as a protest against German barbarities to women and wounded. He was a CVO in 1906; became Colonel 2 September 1908, and retired on 22 March 1910 to work for Boy Scouts and National Service, in order to meet the German menace. Colonel Trench wrote a book called 'Manoeuvre Orders'. He married, in 1900, Anne Somerville, daughter of John N Craddock, of Tuscaloosa, USA.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
TringhamArchibald MontgomeryLieutenantTRINGHAM, ARCHIBALD MONTGOMERY, Lieutenant, was born 16 September 1869, son of the Reverend W and Mrs Tringham. He was educated at Charterhouse, and entered the Royal West Surrey Regiment 15 March 1893, becoming Lieutenant 11 November 1896. He took part in operations on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98, with the Malakand Field, Mohmand Field and Tirah Expeditionary Forces, and received the Medal with two clasps. He served in the South African War, 1899-1901, and was severely wounded. He was present in operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Elandslaagte, Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop; Defence of Ladysmith, including sortie of 7 December 1899; operations in Natal, March to June 1900; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to April 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette,- 27 September 1901]: "Archibald Montgomery Tringham, Lieutenant, Royal West Surrey Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 29 October 1901. He became Captain 22 January 1902; was Brigade Major to the Inspector General of Volunteers, India, 3 September 1903 to 2 February 1904; Adjutant, Special Reserve, 4 December 1911 to 31 July 1915. He served in the European War, 1914-18; was promoted to Major 19 May 1915; was Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, commanding Service Battalion Royal West Surrey Regt, 31 October 1915 to 1 September 1918, and from 2 September 1918. He was mentioned in Despatches, and given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 3 June 1917. Lieutenant Colonel A M Tringham married, in 1906, Mary, third daughter of B W Leader, RA.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Queen's) Royal West Surrey Regiment
TrotterAlgernon RichardCaptainTROTTER, ALGERNON RICHARD, Captain, was born in London 20 June 1870, son of Major General Sir H Trotter, GCVO, and the Honourable Lady Trotter (nee Honourable Eva Gifford), daughter of the 2nd Baron Gifford. He joined the 2nd Life Guards as Second Lieutenant 10 February 1892; became Lieutenant 5 April 1893; was Adjutant, 2nd Life Guards, 22 May 1895 to 8 October 1898; passed the Staff College; was ADC (extra) to GOC, Aldershot, 9 October 1898 to 8 October 1899; became Captain 16 November 1899; served in South African Campaign, 1899-1900; was ADC to General Commanding-in-Chief, Sir R Buller, VC; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations on Tugela Heights; during operations in Natal, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek; was mentioned in Despatches (Sir R H Buller, 30 March and 9 November 1900); received the Queen's Medal and six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Algernon Richard Trotter, Captain, 2nd Life Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 3 June 1901. He was appointed ADC to GOC, Natal, 10 January 1900 to 9 January 1901. On his return to England he was appointed ADC (extra) to GOC, Aldershot, 10 January 1901 to 30 September 1901; was created an MVO (4th Class), 1902. He was promoted Major 12 January 1907, and was Brigade Major, Lowland Mounted Brigade, Scottish Command (Special Extra-Regimental Employment), 29 April 1910 to 9 April 1911. He received the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 18 January 1911. He served during the European War, 1914-18; was Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, Commanding Reserve Regiment of 2nd Life Guards, 11 August 1916 to 22 April 1918, and Machine Gun Guards and Regimental District 23 April to 31 December 1918; became Temporary Colonel 23 April to December 1918; Machine Gun Guards and Regimental District 10 May 1918. He received the Brevet of Colonel 1 January 1919. In 1901, he married Lady Edith Mary Montgomery, youngest daughter of 10th Earl of Eglinton and Winton, and they had four sons and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Life Guards
TrotterEdward HenryCaptainTROTTER, EDWARD HENRY, Captain, was born 1 December 1872, son of Major General Sir Henry Trotter, GCVO, and the Honourable Ena, eldest daughter of the 2nd Baron Gifford. He entered the Grenadier Guards as Second Lieutenant 28 June 1893, and was promoted Lieutenant 25 August 1897. He served in the Nile Expedition, 1898; took part in the Battle of Khartoum, and received the Egyptian Medal with clasp. He was promoted Captain 28 January 1900. He served during the South African War, 1900-1902, with the City of London Imperial Volunteers, on the Staff; during operations in the Orange Free State, May 1900, including action at Zand River; during operations in the Transvaal, May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); during operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, August 1900. He was employed with Mounted Infantry during operations in Cape Colony, 1901-2; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Edward Henry Trotter, Captain, Grenadier Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He became Major 26 September 1908. Major Trotter served in the European War from 1914, as Temporary Lieutenant Colonel from 1 September 1914, commanding the 18th Battalion Liverpool Regiment He was killed in action 8 July 1916. The following is an extract from a newspaper: "A tribute to the benefits of sport was paid in his will by Lieutenant Colonel E H Trotter, DSO, Grenadier Guards, who was killed in France in July. He left £25,170, and bequeathed:—'To the Grenadier Guards the regimental cup which I won the first year I joined, in the hope that sport of all sorts will long flourish in the regiment, it having been my experience in all the wars I have been in that the best sportsman makes the best soldier, and I should like this fact to be inscribed on the cup' ".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Grenadier Guards
TrotterGerald FredericCaptainTROTTER, GERALD FREDERIC, Captain, was born 21 July 1871, in London, second son of Major General Sir H Trotter, GCVO (Grenadier Guards, 1864 to 1898; Lieutenant Colonel of the Regiment), and the Honourable Ena Gifford. He was educated in HMS Britannia, and joined Grenadier Guards 1892. He received the Jubilee Medal, 1897, and was promoted Captain in 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902 (severely wounded in March 1900, and had his arm amputated), during advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; during February to May 1900, operations in the Orange Free State, including actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein; took part in the operations in the Transvaal and Cape Colony, May 1902; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and the King's Medal with clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Gerald Frederic Trotter, Captain, Grenadier Guards. In recognition of services during recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by HM the King 29 October 1901. He was created an MVO in 1906; was promoted to Major 8 August 1907, and retired 27 July 1912, joining the Reserve of Officers of the Grenadier Guards. He was superintendent of Gymnasia. On the outbreak of fie European War in 1914, he rejoined the Grenadier Guards as Major, and served with the 1st Battalion of that regiment in France from 1914 until 1916. In 1915 he was appointed Temporary Lieutenant Colonel in command of 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards until 1916, when he was appointed Brigadier General in command of Infantry Brigade, which appointment he held until June 1917. In October 1917, appointed Brigadier General on the General Staff to command the British Military Mission (Training) to USA. He was mentioned in Despatches, January and June 1916; created a CMG, 1916, and given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1916; was mentioned in Despatches in January 1917, and June 1917, and created a CB, June 1917, and a CBE, 1919. On 19 December 1918, he was given the honorary rank of Brigadier General.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Grenadier Guards
TrousdaleRobert CecilLieutenantTROUSDALE, ROBERT CECIL, Lieutenant, was born 4 June 1876, son of the Reverend H Trousdale. He joined the Army, as a Second Lieutenant in the South Lancashire Regiment, 24 March 1897, and was promoted Lieutenant 25 January 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902 (employed with Mounted Infantry); was present at the Relief of Lady-smith, including operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz, and during the operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February); took part in the operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902; also during operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in September and October 1901, including the defence of Fort Itala. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 17 January 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Robert Cecil Trousdale, Lieutenant, The Prince of Wales's Volunteers, South Lancashire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted Captain 28 February 1904; Officer of a Company of Gentleman Cadets RMC 18 September 1905, and retired from the Service 27 March 1912. Major, Reserve of Officers, 8 June 1916.
DSO, MC, QSA (5) T-H OFS RofL Trans L-N (Lt, S Lancs Regt), 1914-15 Star (Capt, DSO), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Maj). Spink 1987 est £800-1,200.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince of Wales's Volunteers) South Lancashire Re
TuckerSydney NorvalCaptainTUCKER, S N, Captain, was born at Kimberley, South Africa, 22 June 1876, son of Henry Tucker, of Canterbury, England, and of Annie Cawood Cradock, Cape Colony. He was educated at Bedford, Cape Colony; was a Private in the Kimberley Rifles, 1891-95, and the same in the DEOVR, 1895-97. He was a Trooper (promoted to Corporal) in Plumer's Matabeleland Relief Force, 1896; Major Watt's Column to Mashonaland, 1896; Trooper, Mounted Company, DEOVR, Mashonaland Campaign, 1897; Clerk in the Cape Government Railways and Cape Town Harbour Board, 1897-99; Lieutenant, .South African Light Horse, 1899; Captain, SAL Horse, 1900; Captain, SA Constabulary, 1900. He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, and for services rendered in the SAL Horse in Natal and the Eastern Transvaal was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "S N Tucker, Captain, South African Light Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa”. Captain Tucker was unmarried. He was killed 4 February 1902.
DSO, CGHGSM Bechuanaland, BSACoM, QSA (6) CC T-H OFS RofL L-N D-H, KSA (2). Displayed at the OMRS Convention 1988.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South African Light Horse
TudorPiers LloydLieutenantTUDOR, PIERS LLOYD, Lieutenant, served in South Africa with the New Zealand Contingent, 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Piers Lloyd Tudor, Lieutenant, New Zealand. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He died in 1913.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
New Zealand contingent
TudwayRobert JohnMajorTUDWAY, ROBERT JOHN, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, was born 19 November 1859, son of the Reverend Henry Tudway, of Walton-in-Gordano, Somerset. He entered the Army as a Second Lieutenant in the 56th Foot 13 August 1879, and became Lieutenant in the Essex Regiment 1 July 1881. He served with the Soudan Expedition, 1884-85, on the Nile; employed with Mounted Infantry; took part in the action of Abu Klea and reconnaissance of 17 February. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 27 March and 25 August 1885]; received the Medal with two clasps; Bronze Star. He became Captain 21 April 1886; served in the Soudan, 1888, at Suakin; took part in the action of Gamaizah, in command of Mounted Infantry (Despatches [London Gazette, 11 January 1889]; clasp; 4th Class Medjidie); accompanied the Expedition to Dongola, 1896, in command of Camel Corps: served during operations of 7 June and 19 September (Despatches [London; Gazette, 3 November 1896]; Brevet of Major 18 November 1896; Egyptian Medal with two clasps); served with the Nile Expedition, 1897 (Despatches [London Gazette, 25 January 1898]; clasp to Egyptian Medal); with the Nile Expedition, 1898, in command of Camel Corps; at the Battle of Khartoum (Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898]; Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 16 November 1898; clasp to Egyptian Medal, and Medal); served in the South African War, 1899-1902, on the Staff; at the Relief of Kimberley; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February 1900, including operations at Paardeberg, 17 to 26 February (severely wounded 18 February); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July 1900; in Orange River Colony; also in Cape Colony, south of Orange River 1899; again in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was promoted Major 15 February 1900. For his services in South Africa he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Robert John Tudway, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, Major, Essex Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GO, Transvaal, and presented at Harrismith 16 March 1903. He served as DAAG, South Africa, 4 November 1900 to 21 September 1903; DAAG, 5th Division, 2nd Army Corps, Southern Command, 22 September 1903 to 7 March 1905; was given the Brevet of Colonel 16 November 1904; promoted Substantive Lieutenant Colonel 16 May 1906 to command the Essex Regiment; created a CB in 1909; Substantive Colonel 16 May 1910; OC, No 3 District, Western Command, 5 September 1911 to 30 December 1914. He was promoted Temporary Brigadier General 31 December 1914, and commanded a Brigade until 20 June 1915, serving in the Dardanelles. He became DA and QMG 21 June 1915. For his services in the Dardanelles he was created a CMG in 1916, and made an Officer of the Legion of Honour. He saw service in 1916 in France; was mentioned in Despatches, France, 1916; was placed on retired pay 18 November 1916; received the honorary rank of Brigadier General 11 April 1917, and granted the Reward for Meritorious Service. Brigadier General R J Tudway married, in 1906, Olive Winifred, daughter of E W Browne.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Essex Regiment
TurnerBingham AlexanderCaptainTURNER, BINGHAM ALEXANDER, Captain, was born 30 May 1877, son of General E P Bingham Turner and Helen, daughter of Sir Casimir Gzowski, ADG, KCMG. He was educated at Wellington and Sandhurst, and was commissioned in the Rifle Brigade 22 January 1898; served in the Nile Expedition, 1898, being present at the Battle of Khartoum; received the Medal and the Egyptian Medal with clasp. He became Lieutenant 11 December 1899, and served in the South African War, 1899-1902, taking part in operations in Natal in 1899, including the action at Lombard's Kop. He took part in the defence of Ladysmith, including the sortie of 10 December 1899, and action of 6 January 1900; operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) (slightly wounded) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September). He was subsequently employed with Mounted Infantry; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 25 April 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Bingham Alexander Turner, Captain, The Rifle Brigade. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. In July 1909, he retired from the Regular Army, and joined the 6th (Reserve) Battalion of his regiment, being attached to the 2nd Battalion KRRC for active service. He was killed in action 2 November 1914. Captain Turner had married, in 1906, Gladys, daughter of J S St Vincent Jervis.
DSO, Queens Sudan (2nd Lt, RB), QSA (4) DofL L-N Belf OFS (Capt, RB), KSA (2) (Capt, RB), Khedives Sudan Khartoum (2nd Lt, RB), 1914 Star (Capt, RB), BWM (Capt). Glendinings 1997 est £1,000-1,200. DNW 2002 £3,200.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince Consort's Own) Rifle Brigade
TurnerFrank CecilCaptainTURNER, FRANK CECIL, Captain, was born 16 September 1868, son of Captain Francis Charles Turner, Cameron Highlanders and Dorset Regiment, and of Emma Gracioza Turner (nee Doering), and grandson of Major General William Turner, CB, Bombay Army. He was educated at Edinburgh Academy and St Andrews University, and joined the 4th Battalion, the Cheshire Regiment, January 1900. He served in South Africa, 1900-2, with the 4th Battalion Cheshire Regiment, commanding Mounted Infantry Company. He was present in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900; operations in Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, November 1901 to April 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; awarded the Queen's Medal with two clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Frank Cecil Turner, Captain, Cheshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". (In particular for the capture of a Boer laager on the Caledon River, Orange Free State, 1901). He became Major in the 31st Regiment (British Columbia Horse) 28 November 1913, in which he commanded a squadron. He joined Lord Strathcona's Horse (RC) 2 October 1914, and served in the European War with the British Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders, again in command of a squadron. He was demobilized 27 March 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Cheshire Regiment
TurnerHenry GordonCaptainTURNER, HENRY GORDON, Captain, was born in 1862, son of the Reverend J Turner, of Mansfield-Woodhouse, Nottinghamsliire. He served in the South African War, 1902, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Henry Gordon Turner, Captain, De Montmorency's Scouts. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented by Colonel Long at Dordrecht 25 December 1901. Captain Turner married, in 1890, Mabel Eugene, daughter of Myles L Formby. De Montmorency's Scouts were; raised by Captain the Honourable R H L J de Montmorency, VC. Sir A Conan Doyle, on page 158 of his 'Great Boer War', says of him, when describing the doings of General Gatacre's small force while holding the district from Sterkstroom to East London unflinchingly: "Scouting and raiding expeditions, chiefly organized by Captain de Montmonrency—whose early death cut short the career of one who possessed every quality of a partisan leader—broke the monotony of inaction. On 23 February 1900, General Gatacre sent out a force to reconnoitre the enemy's position at Storrnberg. The incident is memorable as having been the cause of the death of Captain de Montmorency, one of the most promising of the younger officers of the British Army. He had formed a corps of scouts, consisting originally of four men, but soon expanding to seventy or eighty. At the head of these men he confirmed the reputation for desperate valour which he had won in the Soudan, and added to it proofs of the energy and judgment which go to make a leader of light cavalry. In the course of the reconnaissance he ascended a small kopje, accompanied by three companions—Colonel Hoskier, a London Volunteer soldier; Vice, a civilian, and Sergeant Howe. 'They are right on the top of us', he cried to his comrades as he reached the summit, and dropped next instant with a bullet through his heart. Hoskier was shot in five places, and Vice was mortally wounded, only Howe escaping. The rest of the scouts, being farther back, were able to get under cover and to keep up a fight until they were extricated by the remainder of the force ... De Montmorency had established a remarkable influence over his rough followers. To the end of the war they could not speak of him without tears in their eyes. When I asked Sergeant Howe why his Captain went almost alone up the hill, his answer was, 'Because the Captain knew no fear'. Byrne, his soldier servant (an Omdurman VC, like his master) galloped madly off next morning with a saddled horse, to bring back his Captain alive or dead, and had to be forcibly seized and restrained by our cavalry".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Montmorency's Scouts
TurnerR E WLieutenantTURNER, R E W, Lieutenant, was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "R E W Turner, Lieutenant, Royal Canadian Dragoons. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Sir R E W Turner was awarded the Victoria Cross. The 'Canadian Gazette' of 5 July 1917, says: "The high place which that gallant war veteran, Major General Sir Richard Turner, VC, DSO, now holds in the Canadian Military organization was made evident to all at the Jubilee Service in Westminster Abbey. He and Sir George Perley, walking side by side, were the only Canadians in the royal procession as it made its way through the nave to the sanctuary. What Sir William Robertson is to the whole British forces, General Turner is, in a sense, to the Canadian forces overseas. He holds the senior military appointment, and is chief military adviser to the Overseas Minister of Militia, Sir George Perley, who is, so to speak, the Lord Derby of the Canadian organization; while the post of Major General Sir Arthur Currie, in command of the Canadian Army Corps, may be said to resemble in its lesser degree that of General Haig in command of the whole British Empire forces on the Western front". The 'Canadian Gazette' account of Sir R E W Turner says also that: "He went to the front early in the present war, and was in command of the Canadian Highland Brigade during the fighting at Langemarck, where 75 per cent, of the men engaged were killed, wounded, or taken prisoners. In the terrible fighting the Germans would have been able to break through at Langemarck had it not been for the courage and resourcefulness shown by the Canadian forces, including those led by General Turner and the officers and men under him".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Canada contingent
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