Search:
(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
TurnerReginaldLieutenantTURNER, REGINALD, Lieutenant, was born in 1870, son of Frederick Turner, Surgeon, Buxton. He was educated at St John's College, Cambridge, and served in the South African War, 1899-1901. He was mentioned three times in Despatches; awarded the Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Reginald Turner, Lieutenant, South African Light Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 3 June 1901. He served in the European War; became Captain, Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment, 6th Battalion; Major, Royal Fusiliers, 9 September 1914; went out to France as Second-in-Command; was wounded; mentioned three times in Despatches. As a mining engineer he had experience of most gold-fields of the world.
DSO, QSA (6) CC T-H OFS RofL Trans L-N (Maj, SALH). National Army Museum, London 1995.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South African Light Horse
TurtonWilliam HarryMajorTURTON, WILLIAM HARRY, Major, was born 30 December 1856, at Peshawar, India, son of Lieutenant Colonel and Brevet Colonel Joseph Turton, Bengal Artillery, and grandson of Zouch Turton, of Chepstow and Monmouth. He was educated at Clifton College (Schools' Gold Medal of the Royal Geographical Society), and at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich (Pollock Medallist); and was gazetted to the Royal Engineers, as Lieutenant, 14 August 1876. He became Captain 14 August 1887, and Major 2 May 1895. He served in the South African War, May 1900 to May 1902, chiefly in the Kimberley and Mafeking Districts, but arrived too late for the sieges. He was Commanding Royal Engineer, Western District, Transvaal, from 4 October 1901 till the end of the war, and was engaged in constructing blockhouse lines along the railway, from Kimberley north as far as Gaberones, and a few across country. The greatest number of blockhouses erected in any one month was 375 (28 March to 28 April 1902), perhaps a record. He was present in operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, and in Orange River Colony, July to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River, June to July 1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to March 1901, and October 1901 to 31 May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to March 1901; operations in Cape Colony, March to October 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches 8 July 1902 [London Gazette, 17 June 1902], received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "William Harry Turton, Major, Royal Engineers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Lieutenant Colonel Turton says: "I was never officially informed as to why I was awarded the DSO I do not think it was customary to do so in that war. But I have no doubt in my own mind that it was in consequence of my defence of Christiana, Transvaal, where I was in command from July 1900 to March 1901. At the request of the Editor, I wrote a short account of this for the 'Royal Engineers' Journal', July 1901, but of course it had to be censored, and some of the most interesting parts were omitted". He became Lieutenant Colonel 1 October 1902, and retired from the Service 4 October 1905. Lieutenant Colonel Turton was the author of a book called 'The Truth of Christianity' , which has been translated into Japanese, Italian, Chinese and Arabic. He was also the author of several hymns, one of which on the 'Sacrament of Unity' has been included in the 'Ancient and Modern', and at least a dozen other collections. He took an interest in genealogy and conchology.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
TusonGeorge EdwardCaptainTUSON, GEORGE EDWARD, Captain, was born 20 January 1871. He was gazetted to the 16th Lancers 8 October 1890; became Lieutenant 31 July 1894, and served on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98 (Tochi), as Regimental Commandant and Transport Officer (9 July to November 1897), receiving the Medal and clasp. He was promoted to Captain 9 October 1899. Captain Tuson served in the South African War, 1900-2, taking part in the advance on Kimberley and the Relief of Kimberley (wounded); operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Karee Siding, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, August to September 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, July to 29 November 1900), including actions at Bethlehem (7 July) and Wittebergen (1 to 20 July); operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to February 1901, and March to June 1901; operations in Cape Colony, February and March 1901, and June 1901. He received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "George Edward Tuson, Captain, 16th Lancers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted to Major 23 May 1903, and retired 9 June 1909. Major Tuson married, in 1912, Isabel, eldest daughter of S Bright-Williams, of Broadstairs, and widow of James Lawe, and they had one son and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
16th (The Queen's) Lancers
TweedieHenry CarmichaelCaptainTWEEDIE, HENRY CARMICHAEL, Captain, was born 25 January 1876, second son of Major General Michael Tweedie, of Boveney, Folkestone, formerly of the Royal Artillery. He was educated privately, and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and joined the North Staffordshire Regiment 6 September 1896; became Lieutenant 24 February 1899, and Captain 13 November 1901. He served in South Africa, 1900-2, being employed throughout the war with the Mounted Infantry; took part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May, 1900, including operations at Paardeberg, 17 to 26 February; action at Driefontein; operations in the Transvaal, June to 29 November 1900; operations in the Transvaal, 30 November 1900 to December 1901, and March to 31 May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, June to September 1901, and January to March 1902; operations in Cape Colony, September to November 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 25 April 1902]; awarded the Queen's Medal with four clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Henry Carmichael Tweedie, Captain, North Staffordshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Assistant Commandant, Mounted Infantry School, 1909; was promoted Major December 1913. He served during the Mohmand disturbances, North-West Frontier of India, in 1914 and 1915; and in the European War, in France, attached to the South Staffordshire Regiment. He was severely wounded, and subsequently became Commandant RAF School, Henley-on-Thames. He was awarded the OBE May 1919. In 1914 he married Catherine (Katie) Lucy Minnie, daughter of Colonel A W Prior, of Lyncroft House, Lichfield, Staffordshire, and had two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince of Wales's) North Staffordshire Regiment
TwemlowFrancis RandleMajorTWEMLOW, FRANCIS RANDLE, Lieutenant Colonel, was born at Smallwood, Cheshire, 20 December 1852, son of Francis Cradock Twemlow, of Peatswood, Staffordshire, Clerk in Holy Orders. He was educated at Winchester, and at Christ Church, Oxford (MA, 1st Class Honours in Modern History, 1875), and the Inner Temple, and joined the Militia 8 August 1874. Lieutenant Colonel Twemlow served in South Africa, March 1900 to May 1902; was Commandant, Fraserburg District, December 1900 to August 1901; OC, 4th North Staffordshire Regiment, August 1901 to February 1902 (in the absence of Colonel Mirehouse, CMG, on sick leave). He took part in operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900; operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony, March 1902; operations in Cape Colony, 30 November 1900 to May 1902. For his services in South Africa he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal and three clasps; King's Medal and two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Francis Randle Twemlow, Major and Honorary Lieutenant Colonel, 4th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902. He commanded the 4th North Staffordshire Regiment from 13 December 1905 to 29 August 1908; was promoted Honorary Colonel 14 December 1906, and retired under the age clause, 29 August 1908. After the outbreak of the European War he was commissioned to raise a new Territorial Battalion (3/6th North Staffordshire Regiment), 4 April 1915. He was gazetted to the Territorial Force Reserve from 14 December 1915. He married (1st), at Topsham, Devon, 17 December 1878, Evelyn Harriet (who died in 1880), daughter of Sir J T B Duckworth, 2nd Baronet; and (secondly), 11 July 1882, at St George's, Hanover Square, Annie Mary Gertrude, daughter of the Reverend Edward Lewis, and they had one daughter, Evelyn Dorothy.
DSO, QSA (3) CC OFS Trans (Lt Col, DSO, N Staffs Regt), KSA (2) (Lt Col, DSO, N Staffs Regt, [1914 Star, BWM, Victory medal]. Spink 1983 £450.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince of Wales's) North Staffordshire Regiment
TwyfordErnest Henry SamuelMajorTWYFORD, ERNEST HENRY SAMUEL, Major, was born 28 October 1863. He joined the Scottish Rifles 5 December 1883, as Lieutenant, from the Militia, and was Adjutant, Scottish Rifles, 20 November 1887 to 19 November 1891. He served in the Chin-Lushai Expedition in 1889, as Transport Officer. He became Captain, Scottish Rifles, 7 March 1894, and Major 3 April 1899. Major Twyford served in the South African War, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order, 29 November 1900, and the decoration was gazetted oil 19 April 1901: "Ernest Henry Samuel Twyford, Major, Scottish Rifles. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". Major Twyford was killed 13 April 1901, in the Badfontein Valley, on his way to join the Royal Scots, into which regiment he had been promoted to Second-in-Command for good service in Natal.
DSO, IGS 1854 Chin Lushai 1889-90 (Lt 2/Scot Rifles), QSA (6) CC T-H OFS RofL Trans SA 01 (Maj, DSO, Scot Rifles). DNW 1999 £5,500.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Cameronians) Scottish Rifles
TwynamHumphrey MartinMajor(in the accounts that follow, this recipipient's name is spelled Twyham, Twyhan and Twynam). TWYNAM, HUMPHREY MARTIN, Major, was born 16 March 1858, youngest son of Thomas Twynam, of Fair Oak, Hampshire. He was educated at Sherborne School, and became Second Lieutenant, 33rd Foot, 11 May 1878, and 59th Foot, 30 October 1878. He served in the Afghan War, 1879-80; was present at the actions of Ahmed Khel and Urzoo; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 July 1889], and received the Medal with clasp. A 1913 letter to The Shirburnian, referring to Twyman's obituary, gave a more detailed account of his 'gallant behaviour' at Ahmed Khel. When the British column came under attack the leading Companies of the 59th and, to their right, the 2nd Battalion 60th Rifles, were ordered to wheel inwards. This enabled the guns, loaded with grapeshot, to be brought up and effectively deployed. However the 21-year old Twynam saw that the Battalion Sergeant-Major of the 60th was wounded in the knee and had consequently been left behind, with the Ghazi rapidly bearing down on him. It is reported that Twynam tried to carry him but 16-stone man shouted 'For God's sake, Sir, go back to your Regiment; you can do me no good and I am too heavy to carry'. Twynam accounted for several of the enemy before the group came under fire from the opening salvos of the British guns. The matter was at an end when the Sergeant-Major and his remaining assailants were killed by grape, although 'by a miracle' Twynam escaped injury. He was later fated with a torch parade by his brother officers as well as others from the 60th, who are said 'unanimously' to have recommended him for a Victoria Cross. The Colonel, however, refused to make the recommendation so no formal application was made ( although the Commander-in-Chief Sir Donald Stewart did, as he promised mention Twynam in his despatch). He was promoted to Captain 1 October 1887; took part in the operations in Chitral, with the Relief Force in 1895 (Medal and clasp); was ADC to Major General, India, 13 May 1896 to 5 March 1899; served on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98, in the Tochi Expedition, on the Staff; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 11 February 1898], and received a clasp. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, employed with the South African Constabulary, taking part in operations in the Transvaal; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with clasp, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Humphrey Martin Twynam, Major, The East Lancashire Regiment (South African Constabulary). In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted to Major 24 May 1900, and retired from the East Lancashire Regiment 16 March 1906. He became Lieutenant Colonel commanding the 5th Royal West Kent Regiment, and died at his residence, 1 Hayes Road, Bromley, Kent, on 9 April 1913. He had married Naomi (who died in 1911), daughter of George Leopold Seaward. Lieutenant-Colonel H.M. Twyman, D.S.O., was recommended for the Victoria Cross by his brother Officers following his gallantry at the Battle of Ahmed Khel. A letter from an old friend to Twyman's old school magazine, The Shirburnian, in 1913 detailed the circumstances: 'The obituary notice of Lieutenant-Colonel H.M. Twynam, D.S.O., in The Times of April 11th, says 'His services in the Afghan War, 1879-80, where he was present at the actions of Ahmed Khel and Urzoo, were Mentioned in Despatches, and he received the Medal and clasp'. This is correct; but how few know the dramatic and gallant incident connecting his name with the former battle! The force under Sir Donald Stewart was on the march, when suddenly a considerable body of the enemy was observed on the crest line of some hillocks on the left flank. The Column was halted, and shortly afterwards came the order to deploy in echelon of Companies - left and right alternately and in that formation to advance upon the enemy. On the right of the 59th (2nd East Lancashires) were the 2nd Battalion, 60th Rifles. The leading Companies of both Regiments halting more or less on an alignment. Next arrived the order for the leading Companies of the two Battalions to wheel inwards, to allow the guns, then hurried into position, to break up the enemy's onslaught with grape. During this movement young Twyman noticed that the retiring Company of the Rifles had left behind them their Battalion Sergeant-Major, standing, but severely wounded in the knee. Twyman immediately rushed to his assistance, and in an instant the Ghazio were upon both. The Sergeant-Major called out "For God's sake, Sir, go back to your Regiment; you can do me no good and I am too heavy to carry". He was a man weighing some sixteen stone. Twyman, however, was busily engaged, and had already accounted for three of his assailants, with three or four more fiercely at him, when came the first discharge of grape from our guns. The grape mercifully missed him, laid out two of his opponents and the others hesitated, giving Twyman time to look round, when he saw that the poor Sergeant-Major's troubles were at an end, and he forthwith made for his Company, but, before he reached it, the second discharge of grape whistled past him and around him, yet by a miracle he escaped. His own account was as short and as modest as he could make it, but his brother Officers assured me that in those few moments he disposed of five and some say seven of his opponents, and that in the middle of it he tried to lift or assist and as far as he could protect the Sergeant-Major until he discovered just after the first discharge of grape that he had been killed behind him. That night the Regiment sat him on the wall of a native well, and marched past him with torches, in which many of the 60th joined. His fellow Officers were unanimous that he should be recommended for the V.C. The Colonel alone refused to recommend him, and the reply received from the Commander-in-Chief was that no recommendation for the Victoria Cross could be forwarded without the Colonel's signature, but that the Officer referred to, would be Mentioned in Despatches'. He was indeed Mentioned in Despatches by Lieutenant-General Sir Donald Stewart , K.C.B.: 'The gallant behaviour of Sub.-Lieutenant H.M. Twyman, 59th Foot, is brought specially to notice' [London Gazette 30.7.1880 refers). Twyman, who was 21 years of age at the time, had been educated at Sherborne School and the Royal Military College. He subsequently served in the Chitral Relief Force in 1895 and on the North West Frontier 1897-8 as an A.D.C. to Major-General G. Corrie Bird, C.B., commanding the Tochi Field Force, for which services he was again Mentioned in Despatches (London Gazette 11.2.1898 refers). Promoted Major in May 1900 he served in the Boer War with his Regiment and was attached to Baden-Powell's South African Constabulary on its formation in October 1900. He rose to command 'A' Division, a force of over 2000 men which was heavily engaged in the Guerilla War in the Transvaal as Mounted Infantry rather than a Police Force. He was Mentioned in Despatches on the recommendation of Baden-Powell for 'zealous work and energy in command of 'A' Division' and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazettes 29.7.1902, 31.10.1902 and War Office records refer). Major Twyman retired from the East Lancashire Regiment in March 1906 and was subsequently appointed Lieutenant-Colonel commanding the 5th Battalion, Royal West Kent Regiment. He died in 1913 while still in command and his funeral was attended with full military honours with nearly 500 troops being on parade in full review order. DSO, Afghan (1) Ahmed Khel (Lt), IGS 1895 (2) RofC P-F 1897-98 (Capt), QSA Trans (Maj, DSO, E Lancs Regt), KSA (2) (Maj DSO, E Lancs Regt). Liverpool 2000 £2,100. Spink 2001 £2,760. Morton and Eden Jul 06 £3,700
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South African Constabulary
Tylden-PattensonArthur HenryMajorTYLDEN-PATTENSON, ARTHUR HENRY, Major, was born 30 September 1856, second son of Captain Tylden-Pattenson, JP, DL, of Dashmonden and Ibornden, Kent. He was privately educated, and at Brasenose College, Oxford, and entered the Army 14 September 1878; served in the Zulu War, 1879; was present at the Battle of Ginginhlovo (Medal with clasp); was promoted Captain in 1886; retired 3 November 1897. Reserved in the South African War, 1900-1, as Major, 3rd Battalion The Buff's; during operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to March 1901; during operations in Cape Colony, December 1900; He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; awarded the Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Arthur Henry Tylden-Pattenson, Major, 3rd Battalion, East Kent Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King, 29 October 1901; the Warrant sent 18 January 1902. He became Major, Reserve of Officers, 18 October 1902. He married, in 1893, Alice Maude Mary, daughter of Cyrus Andrews, of Alverton Grange, Nottinghamshire, and they had one daughter.
DSO, SAGS 1879 (Lt, 2/3rd Foot), QSA (3) CC OFS SA 01 (Maj, E Kent Regt). DNW 1999 est £1400-1800, Liverpool 2000 £2,850.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Buffs) East Kent Regiment
TyndallWilliam Ernest MarriottLieutenantTYNDALL, WILLIAM ERNEST MARRIOTT, Lieutenant. was born 2 February 1875. He entered the West Riding Regiment, as Second Lieutenant, 6 March 1895, becoming Lieutenant 29 January 1899; was Adjutant, West Riding Regiment, 29 January 1899 to 27 January 1903. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, Relief of Kimberley; Orange Free State, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, August to 29 November 1900, including actions at Rhenoster Kop; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, August to 29 November 1900; operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He received the Queen's Medal with five clasps: the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "William Ernest Marriott Tyndall, Lieutenant, West Riding Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 18 December 1902. He was promoted to Captain 22 February 1901. Captain Tyndall passed the Staff College. He was Officer, Company of Gentlemen Cadets, Royal Military College, Sandhurst, 28 January 1903 to 21 January 1906; Brigade Major, 15th Brigade, Irish Command, 19 April 1908 to 27 January 1912; DAAG, Western Command, 13 May to 17 November 1914; DAA and QMG 18 November to 6 December 1914; Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, West Riding Regiment, 6 January to 4 April 1915. He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 3 June 1915. He died of wounds 1 August 1916. Lieutenant Colonel Tyndall married, in 1908, Alice Lorna, daughter of Mr Sedgwick, of Byfleet, Surrey.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Duke of Wellington's) West Riding Regiment
UnettJohn AlfredCaptainUNETT, JOHN ALFRED, Captain, was born 3 October 1868, only son of Captain John Unett, 3rd Hussars. He was educated at the United Services College, Westward Ho! and entered the East Yorkshire Regiment 8 June 1889; was promoted Lieutenant 15 December 1891, and Captain 2 April 1898. He served in the South African War, 1900-2, as Station Staff Officer, taking part in operations in the Orange Free State, including action at Houtnek (Thoba Mountain); operations in Orange River Colony, December 1900 to February 1901; March 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "John Alfred Unett, Captain, East Yorkshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the GOC, Transvaal and Orange River Colony, 15 November 1902; were returned to England, and subsequently presented by the King 24 October 1902. He retired 3 October 1908, and entered the Reserve of Officers from the East Yorkshire Regiment. He was appointed Chief Constable of Essex in 1915. Captain Unett married, in 1905, Daisy, youngest daughter of S Slater, JP, of Farsley, Yorkshire.
DSO, KPM (Meritorious Services) (GV), QSA (3), KSA (2). Dixon 1987 £1,700.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
East Yorkshire Regiment
UniackeAndrew GoreCaptainUNIACKE, ANDREW GORE, Captain, was born in 1872. He served with the Canadian North-West Police (including Yukon Force), 1894-98, and fought in the South African War, 1899-1902, with the Canadian Mounted Rifles and 21st Imperial Yeomanry. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; awarded the South African Medals and six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Andrew Gore Uniacke, Captain, 21st Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was placed on the retired list with the honorary rank of Captain, Third County of London Yeomanry, 11 September 1902. Captain Uniacke served in West Africa (Northern Nigeria), 1903-4, taking part in the operations in the Bassa Province against the Okpotos for which he received the West African General Service Medal. He was Commissioner of the Northern Nigeria Police.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
21st Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
UptonEdward James GottCaptainUPTON, EDWARD JAMES GOTT, Captain, was born 17 October 1868, at Debdin Green, Loughton, Essex, son of Major R D Upton, 9th Lancers, and of Sophia Upton (nee Turner). He was educated at Durham School. He served in South Africa, with the Imperial Yeomanry, 1900-2, receiving a commission as Lieutenant, March 1901, and becoming Captain 25 May 1901; was present in operations in the Orange Free State; in the engagements at Wittebergen. He was mentioned in Despatches awarded the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Edward James Gott Upton, Captain, 17th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He served with Brand's Horse in the suppression of the Boer Rebellion in 1914, and in the European War in 1915 in German South-West Africa, Otzimbingue and Otavifontein. Captain Upton married, in 1914, Joanna, second daughter of Vice Admiral William Wilson, of Clyffe Manor, Swindon, Wiltshire.
DSO, QSA (3) CC Trans Witt (Capt, IY), KSA (2) (Capt, IY), 1914-15 Star (Lt, Brands F/State Rifles), BWM (Lt). DNW 2001 est £900-1,200.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
17th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
UssherEdwardCaptainUSSHER, EDWARD, Captain, was born 26 November 1869, eldest son of John Ussher, and Mrs Ussher, of The Dene, Great Budworth, Cheshire. He was educated at Eton and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and entered the 2nd Dragoons 29 March 1890, and became Lieutenant 21 September 1892, and Captain and Adjutant in 1900. He served in the South African War from November 1899 to February 1902; was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's and King's Medals, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Edward Ussher, Captain, 2nd Dragoon Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Captain Ussher died 28 February 1902, from wounds received two days previously at Klippan, in the Transvaal. He had married, in 1897, Selina, daughter of John Bowen, of Burt House, County Donegal.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
2nd Dragoon Guards (Queen's Bays)
VallanceyHenry d'EstampesCaptainVALLANCEY, HENRY D'ESTAMPES, Captain, was born 16 December 1861. He entered the Army, being gazetted as Second Lieutenant to the 29th Foot 22 January 1881, and to the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and subsequently to the 91st Regiment of Foot, becoming Lieutenant, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders 1 July 1881. He was DACG, Commissariat and Transport Staff, 12 July 1886 to 10 December 1888; took part in the operations in Zululand, 1888; became Captain 26 February 1890; was attached Army Service Corps for a period ending in 1891; was Commandant, Base Depot, British Troops, 8 August 1897 to 15 February 1898, serving on the NW Frontier of India (Malakand); Medal and clasp. Captain Vallancey served in the South African War of 1899-1902, as Assistant Provost-Marshal, Natal, 9 October 1899 to 23 March 1900; as Brigade Major, South Africa, 23 March 1930 to 14 February 1901; as DAAG, South Africa, 15 February 1901 to 30 November 1901; from 1 December 1901, he was in command of the Pietersburg Light Horse. He was present at the operations in Natal, including the actions at Talana and Lombard's Kop; defence of Ladysmith; operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September); operations in the Transvaal, November 1900 to May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches (Sir R H Buller, 13 September and 9 November 1900 [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]); received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Henry d'Estampes Vallancey, Captain, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented by Colonel S H Harrison at Pietersburg. He was Staff Officer, Transvaal and Orange River Colony, 10 August 1902 to 11 March 1903; was promoted to Major, 27 June 1903; was DAAG, India, 16 November 1905.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Princess Louise's) Sutherland and Argyll Highland
VaughanCharles DaviesCaptainVAUGHAN, CHARLES DAVIES, Captain, was born at Brynog, Cardiganshire, 22 August 1868, son of Captain Herbert Vaughan, late 68th Regiment, and of Mrs Vaughan, of Whittington, Worcester. Captain and Mrs Herbert Vaughan had six sons, all in the Navy or Army. Charles Davies Vaughan was educated at Cherbourg Naval College (May 1880 to August 1881), and at the US College, Westward Ho! (September 1881 to December 1887). He was gazetted to the Border Regiment, 8 June 1889, as Second Lieutenant, and became Lieutenant 11 November 1891. He served with the Waziristan Expedition, 1894-95 (Medal with clasp); served on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98 (Tochi), as Regimental Commandant; Transport Officer, 1st Brigade (28 October to November 1897) (Medal with clasp). He was promoted to Captain 11 November 1898, and served in the South African War, 1899-1902; took part in the operations in Natal, 1899; at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 17 to 24 January 1900 (severely wounded 20 January); during operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900) and action at Pieter's Hill; in the Orange Free State, April and May 1900; in the Transvaal in June 1900; in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July 1900; in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to November 1900; in Orange River Colony (May 1900); in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899; also during the operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River, May 1900; afterwards employed under Military Governor, Orange River Colony, from 5 November 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Brevet of Major 29 November 1906; the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Charles Davies Vaughan, Captain and Brevet Major, The Border Regiment (South African Constabulary). In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was employed as a District Commissioner in Orange River Colony from November 1900 to February 1901, and with the SAC from 1 March 1901 to 28 February 1906. He accompanied the 1st Battalion Border Regiment, as Second-in-Command, to the Dardanelles, and was killed in action at the landing on 26 April 1915. Major Vaughan had married, on 14 August 1913, at Maymyo, Burma, Dorothy Jean, daughter of Ernest Ashley, and Mrs Ashley, of Staines.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South African Constabulary
VaughanJohnCaptainVAUGHAN, JOHN, Brevet Major, was born 31 July 1871, at Nannau, Dolgelly, North Wales, son of John Vaughan, JP, DL, of Nannau, Dolgelly. He was educated at Eton and Sandhurst; was gazetted to the 7th Hussars 11 March 1891; became Lieutenant 4 September 1894 and served in Matabeleland, 1896, and Mashonaland, 1897, as Troop Commander in the 7th Hussars. He served with the Nile Expedition in 1898, as Troop Commander, 21st Lancers; was present at the Battle of Omdurman, and received the Medal and the Egyptian Medal with clasp. He was promoted to Captain 9 October 1899, and served in the South African War, 1899-1902, on Staff (also acted as ADC to GOC, Cavalry Division, and as DAAG, Intelligence, Cavalry Division) (severely wounded); in command of a column 16 January to 7 February 1902; was present at the Relief of Kimberley; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; in the Transvaal in May and June 1900; in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria; in Cape Colony, south of Orange River; in the Transvaal, March to 31 May 1902; in Orange River Colony, February to March 1902; in Cape Colony, December 1901 to February 1902. Despatches; Brevet of Major 2 November 1900; Queen's Medal with six clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "John Vaughan, Brevet Major, 10th Hussars. For services during operations in South Africa". The services were as follows: On 1 April 1902, near Springs, South Africa, when acting as Intelligence Officer to a Column, he led the Queen's Bays to capture some Boers in a deserted farm. After capturing some prisoners, this regiment was attacked at dawn by superior numbers, and fought a rear-guard action until the 7th Hussars came up and counterattacked the enemy. Major Vaughan commanded one wing of the Bays during the retirement, after having been wounded before daylight, and subsequently advanced with a squadron of the 7th Hussars to assist them by his knowledge of the country. He continued fighting till he fainted. Sir A Conan Doyle says on pages 522-623 of 'The Great Boer War': "One of the consequences of the successful drives about to be described in the Orange River Colony was that a number of the Free Staters came north of the Vaal in order to get away from the extreme pressure upon the south. At the end of March a considerable number had reinforced the local commandos in that district to the east of Springs, no very great distance from Johannesburg, which had always been a storm centre. A cavalry force was stationed at this spot which consisted at that time of the 2nd Queen's Bays, the 7th Hussars, and some National Scouts, all under Colonel Lawley of the Hussars. After a series of minor engagements east of Springs, Lawley had possessed himself of Boschman's Kop, eighteen miles from that town, close to the district which was the chief scene of Boer activity. From this base he dispatched upon the morning of 1 April three squadrons of the Bays under Colonel Fanshawe, for the purpose of surprising a small force of the enemy which was reported at one of the farms. Fanshawe's strength was about three hundred men. The British cavalry found themselves, however, in the position of the hunter who, when he is out for a snipe, puts up a tiger. All went well with the expedition as far as Holspruit, the farm which they had started to search. Commandant Pretorius, to whom it belonged, was taken by the energy of Major Vaughan, who pursued and overtook his Cape cart. It was found, however, that Alberts's commando was camped at the farm, and that the Bays were in the presence of a very superior force of the enemy. The night was dark, and when firing began it was almost muzzle to muzzle, with the greatest possible difficulty in telling friend from foe. The three squadrons fell back upon some rising ground, keeping admirable order under most difficult circumstances. In spite of the darkness the attack was pressed fiercely home, and with their favourite tactics the burghers rapidly outflanked the position taken up by the cavalry. The British moved by alternate squadrons on to a higher rocky kopje on the east, which could be vaguely distinguished looming in the darkness against the sky-line. B squadron, the last to retire, was actually charged and ridden through by the brave assailants, firing from their saddles as they broke through the ranks. The British had hardly time to reach the kopje and to dismount and line its edge when the Boers, yelling loudly, charged with their horses up the steep flanks. Twice they were beaten back, but the third time they seized one corner of the hill and opened a hot fire upon the rear of the line of men who were defending the other side. Dawn was now breaking, and the situation most serious, for the Boers were in very superior numbers and were pushing their pursuit with the utmost vigour and determination. A small party of officers and men whose horses had been shot covered the retreat of their comrades, and continued to fire until all of them, two officers and twenty-three men, were killed or wounded, the whole of their desperate defence being conducted within from thirty to fifty yards of the enemy. The remainder of the regiment was now retired to successive ridges, each of which was rapidly outflanked by the Boers, whose whole method of conducting their attack was extraordinarily skilful. Nothing but the excellent discipline of the overmatched troopers prevented the retreat from becoming a rout. Fortunately, before the pressure became intolerable, the 7th Hussars with some artillery came to the rescue and turned the tide. The Hussars galloped in with such dash that some of them actually got among the Boers with their swords, but the enemy rapidly fell back and disappeared. In this very sharp and sanguinary cavalry skirmish the Bays lost eighty killed and wounded out of a total force of 270. To stand such losses under such circumstances, and to preserve absolute discipline and order, is a fine test of soldierly virtue. The adjutant, the squadron leaders, and six out of ten officers were killed or wounded. The Boers lost equally heavily. Two Prinsloos, one of them a commandant, and three field-cornets were among the slain, with seventy other casualties. The force under General Alberts was a considerable one, not fewer than six hundred rifles, so that the action at Holspruit is one which adds another name of honour to the battle-roll of the Bays. It is pleasing to add that in this and the other actions which were fought at the end of the war our wounded met with kindness and consideration from the enemy". His DSO was gazetted 31 October 1902: "John Vaughan, Captain and Brevet Major, 7th Hussars. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was Brigade Major, 1st Cavalry Division, Aldershot Command, 31 January to 10 October 1904; was promoted to Major 14 May 1904; to Lieutenant Colonel 7 May 1908; to Colonel 6 December 1911, and was Commandant, Cavalry School, Netheravon, 30 January 1911 to 4 August 1914. He served in the European War from August 1914, as GS01, 1st Cavalry Division, BEF, 5 August to 14 September 1914; GOC, 3rd Cavalry Brigade, BEF, 14 October 1915; GOC, 3rd Cavalry Division, 15 October 1915 to 14 February 1918; Inspector of QMG's Services, British Armies in France, 15 February 1918 to 14 February 1919; commanded Cavalry Brigade, Aldershot, from 28 March 1919; was mentioned in Despatches; created a CB in 1915, and a CMG in 1919, and made Commandeur, Legion d'Honneur. He married, 22 October 1913, at St Peter's, Eaton Square, SW, Louisa Evelyn Wardell, daughter of Captain Stewart, of Alltyroden, Cardiganshire, and widow of Harold P Wardell, of Brynwern, Newbridge-on-Wye.
CB (m), CMG, DSO, OStJ (Officer), Queens Sudan (Lt 7 Hus), QSA (6) RofK Paard Drief Joh D-H Belf (Maj 7 Hus), KSA (2) (Maj, DSO, 7 Hus), 1914 Star and Bar (Col, DSO), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Maj-Gen), Defence Medal, Khedives Sudan Khartoum (Lt), Legiod d”Honneur (France) 3rd Class. Spink 1993 est £1,500-2,000.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
7th (The Queen's Own) Hussars
VauxErnestLieutenantVAUX, ERNEST, Lieutenant, was born in 1865, son of J S Vaux, of Sunderland. He saw service with the Durham Royal Garrison Artillery Volunteers, retiring 29 July 1893. He served in South Africa with the Imperial Yeomanry, taking part in operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Lindley (1 to 26 June) and Rhenoster River; operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River, including action at Ruidam; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to June 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Ernest Vaux, Lieutenant, 5th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He became Lieutenant Colonel, 7th Battalion Durham Light Infantry. He served in the European War from 1914 to 1916. He was twice mentioned in Despatches; was created a CMG in 1916, and had the Volunteer Decoration. Lieutenant Colonel E Vaux married, in 1906, Emily L, daughter of H Moon-Ord, and they had two sons.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
5th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
VenablesCharles JohnCaptainVENABLES, CHARLES JOHN, Captain, was born 21 January 1865, son of Right Reverend Addington R P Venables, Bishop of Nassau. He entered the Army 20 August 1885; became Captain, 1892. He served in South Africa as Captain, Gloucestershire Regiment, 1899—1901, taking part in the operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop, and in the defence of Ladysmith. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 Sept 1901]; received the Queen's Medal and two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 Sept 1901]: "Charles John Venables, Captain, Gloucestershire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He was promoted Major 1 November 1905, and retired 26 November 1913. He took part in the European War, and was killed in action 8 August 1915, at the Dardanelles. He had married, in 1896, Helen Margaret, daughter of Robert Terry.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Gloucestershire Regiment
VenningGordon RalphSecond LieutenantVENNING, GORDON RALPH, Second Lieutenant, was born 3 June 1880, the eldest son of Alfred Reid Venning, of Straits Settlements, and 15 Springfield Place, Bath. He was gazetted to the Royal Artillery, as Second Lieutenant, 23 December 1898, and served in the South African War. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order 29 November 1900 [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Gordon Ralph Venning, Second Lieutenant, Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was killed in action 7 March 1902, near Tweebosch, South Africa, on the occasion of Lord Methuen's capture by Delarey, aged 20. The rearguard of Methuen's force consisted of inexperienced irregular troopers, and these, when charged by a large body of Boers, took to flight. After this the handful of men who stood their ground were left in a hopeless position. The two guns of the 38th Battery were overwhelmed by the Boers, every man being killed or wounded, including Lieutenant Nesham, "who acted up to the highest traditions of his corps". The infantry, however, though few in number, were seasoned troops, and they fought for some hours against overwhelming odds. "Two hundred of the Northumberland Fusiliers" (wrote Sir A Conan Doyle) "lay round the wagons, and held the Boers off from their prey. With them were the two remaining guns, which were a mark for a thousand Boer riflemen. It was while encouraging by his presence and example the much-tried gunners of this section that the gallant Methuen was wounded by a bullet which broke the bone of his thigh. Lieutenant Venning and all the detachment fell with their General round the guns".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
VenourWilfred JohnCaptainVENOUR, WILFRED JOHN, Captain, was born 2 May 1870, son of Lieutenant General Venour, ISC. He entered the Army, Royal Dublin Fusiliers, 29 October 1890; became Lieutenant 1(5 December 1893. He was employed with the Egyptian Army 28 December 1898 to 13 October 1899. Captain Venour served in the South African War, 1899-1900; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900) and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in the Transvaal in June 1900; operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); operations in Orange River Colony, June 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Wilfred John Venour, Captain, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was employed with the West African Frontier Force 1 May 1901 to 15 May 1904, serving in 1901-2 in Southern Nigeria, in the Aro Expedition, in command of a column; was slightly wounded, and mentioned in Despatches 12 September 1902; received the Brevet of Major 17 April 1902. In 1902 he served in Southern Nigeria in command of operations in the Nsit Country (clasp). He was Adjutant, Militia, and Adjutant, Special Reserve, from 13 January 1906; became Major 17 August 1908. Major Venour died 6 April 1914.
DSO, 1902 Coronation, QSA (6) CC T-H OFS RofL Trans L-N (Capt, DSO, RDF), AGS 1902 (2) Aro 1901-02 S Nigeria 1902 (Maj, RDF), Khedives Sudan Sudan 1899 (Maj RDF). Gibbons 1979 £900. Liverpool 1990 £1,950.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Dublin Fusiliers
Page 54 of 59
<<First <Prev 52 5354 55 56 Next> Last>>