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 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
BrettCharles Arthur HughCaptainBRETT, CHARLES ARTHUR HUGH, Captain, was born at Muttra, India, 28 March, 1865, son of Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Brett, APD (formerly 2nd Dragoon Guards, Queen's Bays), and Georgina, his wife, daughter of Hugh Hannay, Paymaster, RN. He entered the Army as Lieutenant in the Suffolk Regiment 9 May 1885. He served in the Hazara Expedition in 1888, and received the Medal with clasp; was promoted Captain 15 June, 1894. From January 1895 to January 1899, he was Adjutant of the 1st Battalion of the Suffolk Regiment, and Adjutant, 4th Battalion, 15 November 1900 to 14 November 1905. He again saw active service in the South African War, taking part in the operations south of the Orange River, 1899-1900, including the action at Colesberg when he was severely wounded. Later he saw service in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, and in the Orange River Colony from July to October 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches 10 September 1901, and received the Queen's Medal with three clasps. For his gallantry at Colesberg, in 1900, when, though shot through the lungs, he kept up command of his company actually charging the Boer trenches in this state until he fell exhausted from loss of blood, he was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Charles Arthur Hugh Brett, Captain, Suffolk Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901, and the Warrant, etc, sent 25 January 1902. He was promoted Major, 24 February 1906. When European hostilities commenced he left the Curragh, August 1914, in command of the 2nd Battalion, to go to France, and fell in action at Le Gateau 26 August 1914, whilst leading his men. He was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatches, September 1914. Major Brett married, in 1909, Enid Geraldine, daughter of Lieutenant Colonel H H St George, Senior Ordnance Officer, Scottish District, and they had one daughter, Ione Moncrieff St George, born 10 October 1909.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Suffolk Regiment
BridgesGeorgeLieutenantBRIDGES, GEORGE, Lieutenant, was born 20 February 1876, only son of Captain Edward Bridges, of Zeals, Bath. He served in the Malay Peninsula from 1893 to 1895, and in South Africa from 1899 to 1900, including the Siege of Mafeking. He was wounded in this campaign, mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "George Bridges, Lieutenant, Protectorate Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. Lieutenant Colonel Bridges served in the French Remount Commission in the Argentine Republic August 1914, to May 1915. He served in the European War from 1915 to 1918; was three times mentioned in Despatches, and created a CMG, 1917. He was CRA, Kent Force, August 1917, to April, .1919, and was formerly in the Derbyshire Imperial Yeomanry. He married Gwendoline Elizabeth, daughter of R Pegau, MD, and widow of Captain George Farrar, Lancashire Fusiliers.
CMG, DSO, QSA (1) DofM (Lt Protectorate Regt), KSA (2) (Bomb RFA), 1914-15 Star (Capt RFA), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Lt Col). Spink 1969 £185.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Protectorate Regiment
BridgfordRobert JamesCaptainBRIDGFORD, ROBERT JAMES, Captain, was born 10 March, 1869, son of Sir Robert Bridgford, KCB. He joined the Manchester Regiment from the Militia, 21 December 1889; became Lieutenant 3 December 1891, and Captain 24 January 1898. He served in South Africa, 1898-1902; during the operations in Natal, 1899, including action at Lombard's Kop; taking part in the defence of Ladysmith, including action of 6 January 1900; during operations in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September). He was present during the operations in the Transvaal, December 1900 to July 1901, and November 1901 to April, 1902; during operations in Orange River Colony, March 1901, July to September 1901, and November 1901; in the operations in Cape Colony, March, 1901. He was employed with 1st Johannesburg Mounted Rifles, and in command of Mounted Infantry Battalion (from 24 April, 1901). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901], and received the Queen's Medal with three clasps and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Robert James Bridgford, Captain, Manchester Regiment. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented there. He was promoted to Major 24 February 1904, and was transferred to the Shropshire Light Infantry 16 Sept, 1905. From 8 January 1908, to 15 August 1908, he served as Commandant, Mounted Infantry, in Egypt. Major Bridgford was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 11 February 1914. He served in the European War from 1914; as Temporary Brigadier General, 18th Infantry Brigade, BEF, 14 August 1915, to 2 May 1915; Brigade Commander, 141st Infantry Brigade, British Armies in France, 8 July to 18 August 1916; Brigade Commander, 18th Infantry Brigade, British Armies in France, 19 August 1916, to 29 August 1917; Brigade Commander, 2nd Reserve Infantry Brigade, Home Forces, 14 October 1917, to 18 March, 1918; Divisional Commander, British Armies in France, 9 April, to 26 April, 1918; Temporary Major General 9 April, to 30 May 1918; Divisional Commander, 32nd Division, British Armies in France, 27 April to 30 May 1918; Brigade Commander, 222nd Division, Infantry Brigade, Forces in Great Britain, 6 August 1918. He was created a CB. Colonel Bridgford married, in 1898, Mary Constance, daughter of the Venerable Frederick Charles Hamilton. CB, (m), CMG, DSO, QSA (5) CC DofL OFS L-N Belf (Capt DSO Man Regt), KSA (2), 1914-15 Star (Lt Col), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Maj-Gen). Sotheby's 1997 est £1200-1500.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Manchester Regiment
BrierleyGeoffrey TealeCaptainBRIERLEY, GEOFFREY TEALE, Captain, was born 14 July 1873, at Presteigri, Radnorshire, Wales, second son of Prebendary Joseph Henry Brierley and Mrs Brierley, of Whitbourne, Herefordshire. He was educated at Rossall, and was gazetted to the Royal Artillery 1 April, 1893, becoming Lieutenant 1 April, 1896, and Captain 7 March, 1900. Captain Brierley served in the Boer War, 1899-1902, with the Imperial Light Horse, and was severely wounded. He was present at operations in the Orange Free State, including actions at Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, 29 November 1900, including actions near Frederickstad (17to 25 October); operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 9 July and 10 September 1901, and 25 April, 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Geoffrey Teale Brierley, Captain, Royal Garrison Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. Captain Brierley was Instructor, School of Gunnery, 12 November 1902 to 5 July 1905; Instructor (1st Class). School of Gunnery, 26 July to 11 November 1905; Adjutant, RA, 1 November 1910 to 31 October 1912. He was promoted to Major 1 April, 1914. Major Brierley served in France with the 1st Division, commanding 26th (Heavy) Battery, RGA. He took part in the Retreat and Advance on the Aisne; was present at Ypres, and was dangerously wounded 31 October 1914; was DAAG in the disciplinary branch at the War Office, August 1915 to February 1918, when he became attached to the Royal Air Force, and was employed in similar work at the Air Ministry. He became Lieutenant Colonel 22 November 1917, and was created a CMG in 1919. He married, 10 May 1916, Eily, only daughter of Inspector-General Coppinger, RN.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Garrison Artillery
BrintonJohn ChaytorCaptainBRINTON, JOHN CHAYTOR, Captain, was born 5 April, 1867. He was gazetted to the 2nd Life Guards 28 January 1891; became Lieutenant 13 April, 1892, serving in the Nile Expedition of 1898, when he was present at the Battle of Khartoum (severely wounded); mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898]; received the Egyptian Medal with clasp; became Captain 12 January 1899. He was on Special Service in South Africa 16 November 1899 to 16 September 1900; on Remount Duty, and on the Staff of Lieutenant General Sir J D P French. He was present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg and action at Driefontein; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "John Chaytor Brinton, Captain, 2nd Life Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 27 October 1901. He was ADC (extra) to the Viceroy of Ireland 1 July 1901 to 10 August 1902; was created an MVO, 1905; promoted to Major 20 October 1906, and retired 18 January 1911. He rejoined in 1914, and served in the European War, 1914-16; was mentioned in Despatches twice; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1919, and was made a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. Lieutenant -Colonel Brinton was Gentleman Usher-in-Ordinary to His Majesty. He married, in 1913, Evelyn Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Sir Charles Forbes, 4th Baronet of Newe, and widow of William D James, of West Dean, Sussex
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Life Guards
BrittanReginaldCaptainBRITTAN, REGINALD, Captain, was born 26 January 1865, son of Reverend C Brittan and of Julia Brittan, daughter of Hartley P Gisborne. He was educated at Clifton and Malvern Colleges, and entered the Army (The Sherwood Foresters) 29 August 1885; became Captain, Sherwood Foresters, 1892. He was appointed Adjutant, 4th Battalion Sherwood Foresters, 1895; served in the South African War, 1899-1901; as Adjutant, 4th Battalion Derbyshire Regiment (from 11 January 1900, to 10 May 1901), taking part in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; during operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900; serving in the operations in Cape Colony 30 November 1900, to April, 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Reginald Brittan, Captain, Derbyshire Regiment. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He commanded the 4th Sherwood Foresters from 1908. After the outbreak of the European War he commanded the 14th Sherwood Foresters, November 1914, to October 1916, when the name was changed to the 13th Battalion Training Reserve, and later to the 53rd Sherwood Foresters. He gave up the Command, and was demobilized in April, 1919, and awarded the OBE. He married, in 1893, Alice, daughter of William Gisborne, of Allestree Hall, Derbyshire, and they had one son, Jack Reginald, born on 6 May 1897, and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Sherwood Foresters) Derbyshire Regiment
BrocklebankJohn JasperLieutenantBROCKLEBANK, JOHN JASPER, Lieutenant, was born 5 Sept, 1875, second son of Sir Thomas Brocklebank, 2nd Baronet. He was educated at Eton and Cambridge. He served in South Africa, from 1900 to 1902, with the Imperial Yeomanry and the King's Dragoon Guards, being present in operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; awarded the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "John Jasper Brocklebank, Lieutenant, 8th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. For services in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC, Transvaal and Orange River Colony, 15 November 1902. Major Brocklebank (Scottish Horse, late 1st Dragoon Guards) married, in 1914, Constance Mary, daughter of Sir R Leonard Powell, and they had one son. DSO, QSA (3) CC OFS Trans (Lt 1 DG), KSA (2) (Lt DSO 1 DG), 1914-15 Star (Maj 3rd Scottish Hrse), BWM, Victory Medal (Maj), Order of Franz Josef (Austria). Burman 1994 £2200.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
8th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
Brodielan Ashley MortonCaptainBRODIE, IAN ASHLEY MORTON, Captain, was born 26 September 1868, eldest son of Hugh Brodie of Brodie and Lady Eleanor Brodie, sister of the 3rd Earl of Ducie. He was Lord Lieutenant of Nairnshire and a landed proprietor there. He was educated at Eton and Cambridge, and joined the Scots Guards in 1890, serving in that regiment for about three years. He served in the South African War with Lord Lovat's Scouts, 1900-2, and took part in operations in the Transvaal, May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including action at Wittebergen; operations in the Orange River Colony and Cape Colony 30 November 1900, to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; awarded the Queen's and King's South African Medals with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "lan Ashley Morton Brodie, Captain, Lovat's Scouts (Imperial Yeomanry). In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Major 30 March, 1903, and retired from the Service. Major Brodie of Brodie served in the European War, 1915, in the Dardanelles, Egypt and Palestine. For his services he received a mention in Despatches and was awarded the Military Cross. He married, in 1904, Violet, daughter of Colonel Montagu Hope, and they had one son. DSO, MC, 1911 Coronation, QSA (4) CC Joh D-H Witt, KSA (2) (Capt Lovat's Scouts), 1914-15 Star (Capt 2 Lovat's Scts), BWM, Victory Medal (Capt). Spinks 1978 £625.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Lovat's Scouts
BromfieldHarry HickmanCaptainBROMFIELD, HARRY HICKMAN, Captain, was born at Snitterfield, Warwickshire, 29 January 1869, son of Henry Bromfield, of Newnham Hall (who died in 1888), and Mary Elizabeth, eldest daughter of John Colthurst, of Chew Court, Somersetshire. He was educated at Malvern College, and at Hertford College, Oxford, and served in the South African War, 1900-2, taking part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Karee Siding, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including action near Johannesburg; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, August to 29 November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, June to August 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to September 1901; operations in Orange River Colony; operations in Cape Colony, September 1901 to February 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Harry Hickman Bromfield, Captain, 3rd South Wales Borderers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 2 June, 1902. Major Bromfield was Chief Constable of Radnorshire. He married, 19 July 1906, at St John the Baptist's Church, Slobech, Pembrokeshire, Ethel Philippa, eldest daughter of Sir Charles Philipps, Baronet, and Lady Philipps, of Picton Castle, Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire, and their son was Charlie Henry Colthurst, born 17 July 1907. He served in the European War as Major, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, and was killed in action 10 September 1916. An obituary notice of him appeared in the 'Times' of 23 September 1916.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South Wales Borderers
Bromley-DavenportWilliamLieutenant ColonelBROMLEY-DAVENPORT, WILLIAM, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 21 January 1863, eldest son of Lieutenant Colonel W Bromley-Davenport, MP. He was educated at Eton, and at Balliol College, Oxford; joined the Staffordshire Yeomanry, serving in the South African War in command of the 4th Imperial Yeomanry Battalion He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "William Bromley-Davenport, Lieutenant Colonel, 4th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 29 October 1901. Colonel Bromley-Davenport was a Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant. He was Member of Parliament (Conservative) for the Macclesfield Division of Cheshire, 1886-1906, and contested the same Division in 1910. He was Financial Secretary, War Office, 1903-5. Colonel Bromley-Davenport commanded the 1st Staffordshire Yeomanry from the outbreak of the War, and went with them to Egypt in November 1915. He was Brigadier General commanding the 1/1st North Midland Brigade, Egyptian Expeditionary Force; Brigadier General in Command of the 22nd Mounted Brigade, Egypt, 1916; Assistant Director of Labour, France, from 1917 (created a CMG, 1918); Assistant Director of Labour, 2nd Army, Italian Expeditionary Force, from November 1917, to April, 1918. Commandant of Labour, France. Colonel Bromley-Davenport was created a CBE in 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
4th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
BrookeVictor ReginaldLieutenantBROOKE, VICTOR REGINALD, Lieutenant, was born at 53, Eaton Square, London, 22 January 1873, son of Sir Victor Alexander Brooke, Baronet, and Alice Sophia, daughter of Sir Alan Bellingham, Baronet. He joined the 9th Lancers 12 December 1894; became Lieutenant 29 April, 1896, and went to South Africa at the beginning of the Boer War (1899-1902). He took part in the Advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; in the Relief of Kimberley; the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg; actions at Poplar Grove and Karee Siding. He was one of the first of our men to be wounded, and in a diary picked up off a wounded Boer was set down the enemy's regret that so good a friend and fighter had been, as they thought, killed. He returned to England to recover from his wounds, and had to have a finger removed. He passed the Staff College in the autumn; became Captain 6 May 1901; returned to South Africa in October 1901, as ADC to Lieutenant General Sir Ian Hamilton, Chief of the Staff (9 November 1901, to 11 September 1902). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901: "Victor Reginald Brooke, Lieutenant, 9th Lancers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Captain Brooke became ADC to Lord Kitchener, and served with him in that capacity in India (28 November 1902, to 21 December 1905); and as Assistant Military Secretary from 22 December 1905, to 31 May 1907. He was sent to Kabul with Sir Louis Dane's Mission at the end of 1904, when the Amir of Afghanistan bestowed an Afghan decoration on him. Captain Brooke was given the Brevet of Major 7 June, 1905; accompanied the Amir of Afghanistan on his visit to India, January and February 1907, and was presented with the Afghan Order of Harmat. He was promoted to Major, 9th Lancers, February 1907, and became Temporary Lieutenant Colonel 1 June, 1907, and was Military Secretary to Lord Minto from 1 June, 1907, until Lord Minto left India at the end of 1910, when he rejoined his regiment. In August 1914, he proceeded to France, forming part of General Headquarters Staff, as Liaison Officer, with General Sardet's Cavalry Corps, during the retreat from Belgium. The following is an extract from an appreciation of Major Brooke in the 'Daily Telegraph' written by 'A Friend': "As to the manner of his death and burial, there is something to be recorded. He died on the night of 29 August, and was buried early next morning at Chateau d'Annel, near Compiegne. The house had been turned into a hospital by Mrs Depew, who left at eleven on the same day, owing to the approach of the German forces. The estate carpenter made his coffin, and one of the old men of the estate dug his grave. After the burial the old man said to Mrs Depew: 'Regardez, Madame'. He pointed out a gravestone to the north of the grave, which had the inscription underneath the date, 1879, 'Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur'. It belonged to one of the family which owned the Chateau d'Annel in those days, all of whom were buried there. Beside them the old gravedigger thought it right to lay Victor Brooke — Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur indeed". Lord Kitchener said of him: "Victor Brooke is one of the best Staff Officers I have ever had, and quite one of the best all-round men to be found". When Lord Hardinge came home, he said to a friend: "Victor Brooke was loved by tens of thousands in India". Lady Minto wrote: "He was an ideal Military Secretary. An indefatigable worker himself, he had that rare gift of getting the best out of others. His example was such a stimulus to everyone to try and live up to his own high standard. Victor was beloved by the Viceroy and every member of his household, and no one was ever in his presence without feeling the better for the magnetic influence of his manly, straightforward character".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
9th (The Queen's Royal) Lancers
BrowneHenry HamiltonCaptainBROWNE, HENRY HAMILTON, Captain, was born 20 June, 1863, son of James Hamilton Browne. He served in South Africa, 1900-2; was mentioned in Despatches, received the Queen's and King's Medals with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Henry Hamilton Browne, Captain, New South Wales Imperial Bushmen. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by Major General M W Willson, CB ( Major General Sir M W Willson, KCB), at Bushey Kop, 1 June, 1902. Captain Hamilton Browne was promoted to Major.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
New South Wales contingent
BrowneJohn WilliamMajorBROWNE, JOHN WILLIAM, Major, served in the South African War in 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches; created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "John William Browne, Major, Cape Police. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Major Browne was District Inspector, Cape Mounted Police. He died about 1914.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Cape Police
BrownleeJohn InnesCaptainBROWNLEE, JOHN INNES, Captain, was born 20 April, 1860, son of Honourable Charles P Brownlee, CMG. He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, taking part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg and actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "John Innes Brownlee, Captain, Cape Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented by Colonel Hutchinson 21 December 1901, at King William's Town. Major Brownlee served during the European War from August 1914 as Lieutenant Colonel, South African Medical Corps; as ADMS No 3 Military District, Cape Province; served in the operations in German South-West Africa, in command of the 1st MBFA from September 1914, to June, 1915. He had the Volunteer Decoration. Lieutenant Colonel Brownlee married, in 1888, Blanche Augusta Stevens.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Cape Medical Staff Corps
Bruce-SteerThomasCaptainBRUCE-STEER, T, Captain, served in the South African War, 1899-1902. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "T Bruce-Steer, Captain, Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry
BrunkerCharles MolyneuxMajorBRUNKER, CAPEL MOLYNEUX, Major, was born 15 October 1858, in Ceylon, son of Major General James Robert Brunker and Marianne (nee Molyneux). He was educated at Cheltenham College, and joined the 43rd Foot 23 October 1880; the 81st Foot 8 December 1880; became Lieutenant, North Lancashire Regiment, 1 July 1881; was Adjutant, North Lancashire Regiment, 6 August 1884 to 5 August 1889; became Captain 17 February 1888; exchanged into the Lancashire Fusiliers 18 February 1891. He served in the Nile Expedition of 1898; was present at the Battle of Khartoum; received the Medal and the Egyptian Medal with clasp. In the same year he also served in Crete. He was promoted to Major 7 March 1900. Major Brunker served in the South African War, 1899-1900, being present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900); operations in Natal, April and May 1900. He was in command of the 2nd Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, from 25 January to 29 March 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and for services at Spion Kop was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Charles Molyneux Brunker, Major, Lancashire Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 29 October 1901. He became Lieutenant Colonel 24 June 1906; was given the Brevet of Colonel 14 June 1909; became Colonel 24 June 1910. He served in the European War, 1914-17; on the Western Front in 1914; at Gallipoli in 1915; was mentioned in Despatches for valuable services in connection with the war [London Gazette, 27 July 1917], and created a CMG in 1917. He retired from the Staff with the honorary rank of Brigadier General 3 January 1918. General Brunker married (1st), in 1902, Marcia Caroline (who died in 1913), daughter of the Reverend Joseph Barker. He married (secondly), in 1914, Dorothy Manners, daughter of A Leland Noel.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Lancashire Fusiliers
BryantHenry GrenvilleLieutenantBRYANT, HENRY GRENVILLE, Lieutenant, was born 5 June, 1872, eldest son of H S Bryant, of 2, Hesketh Crescent, Torquay. He was gazetted to the Bedfordshire Regiment 2 June 1894 and the Shropshire Light Infantry 26 September 1894, becoming Lieutenant, Shropshire Light Infantry, 3 July 1898. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as Brigade Signalling Officer, 13 March to 9 June, 1900; 10 July to 2 September 1900, and 16 October 1900 to 23 July 1901; on Staff (slightly wounded); took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 20 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; served during operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria: in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; also in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Elands River (4 to 16 August); was present during the operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including action at Rhenoster River: in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900; also during the operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900, to 31 May 1902 (Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; Queen's Medal with four clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps). He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: ''Henry Grenville Bryant, Lieutenant, Shropshire Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the South African War". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. He was promoted to Captain 22 January 1902. Captain Bryant served with his battalion in India from March 1904 to January 1905 and again from 1907 to October 1914. In the Great War he served as a Captain with the 2nd Battalion King's Shropshire Light Infantry, entering the France/Flanders theatre of war in December 1914. On 26 April 1915 he led his company in a night attack on a German trench near Ypres. He was seen by his men, at whose head he charged, to reach the parapet, and to be wounded by a hand grenade. He was reported ‘missing'. On 1 May 1915, five days after the action, he died in the Kriegs Lazarette, at Roulers, of heart failure, following the amputation of his right arm. He was buried in the Roeselare Communal Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. A brother officer wrote of him, ‘His name will always be revered in the regiment for what is noblest and best. I never met a man so absolutely without fear'. Captain Bryant married, in 1904, Phyllis Mary, second daughter of J R W Hildyard, of Horsley Hall, County Durham, and Hutton Bonfield Hall, Northallerton. DSO VRI, QSA (4) CC Paard Drie Joh (Lt 2/Shrop LI), KSA (2) (Capt DSO Shrop LI), 14-15 Star (Capt DSO Shrops LI), BWM, VM (Capt). DNW Jun 06 £4,100.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's) Shropshire Light Infantry
BuchanErnest NormanSecond LieutenantBUCHAN, ERNEST NORMAN, Second Lieutenant, was born in Hampshire 15 February 1879, third son of Colonel H P Buchan, of Lockyer House, Plymouth, and of his wife, St Clair, daughter of General Ireland, Governor of Singapore. Mrs H P Buchan formerly lived in Jersey. Ernest Norman Buchan was educated at Mannamead School, Plymouth; joined the Militia (3rd East Lancashire Regiment), in which he served for one year and a hundred days; was gazetted as Second Lieutenant to the Manchester Regiment from the Militia 4 May 1901; was promoted to Lieutenant, Manchester Regiment, 27 November 1901, and to Captain, Manchester Regiment, 1 December 1912. Captain Buchan served in the South African War from 1899 to 1902; as Acting Transport Officer from 20 April, 190?, taking part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including the action at Karee Siding and the operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's South African Medal with three clasps, the King's South African Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Ernest Norman Buchan, Second Lieutenant, 3rd East Lancashire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested with the Insignia of the Distinguished Service Order by His Majesty King Edward VII on the 24th of October 1902. From 12 September 1904 to 2 December 1904, he was Garrison Adjutant, Straits Settlements, Singapore, and he was subsequently stationed at Secunderabad and in the Punjab. On the 25th of September 1914, he proceeded to France, being appointed Brigade Major, 27th Brigade, 11th Division, in August 1915. He was killed in action, during the Battle of Loos, at the Quarries, Hulloch, on the 25th of September following. At first he was only said to be 'missing', but was later 'presumed to have been killed'. Captain Buchan was mentioned in Despatches by Field Marshal Sir John French [London Gazette, 1 January 1916], for gallant and distinguished service in the field. He married, at Singapore, Kythe Elizabeth Graeme, daughter of William Graeme St Clair, of Singapore, and had two sons: Philip William, born 12 August 1905 and Norman Ireland, born 24 April, 1907, both at Wellington, Nilgiri Hills, India.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
East Lancashire Regiment
BuckleChristopher ReginaldMajorBUCKLE, CHRISTOPHER REGINALD, Major, was born 18 October 1862, at Norton House, near Chichester, son of Christopher Richard Buckle, of Norton House, and Caroline Cumberbatch, his wife. He was educated at Sherborne School and at the Royal Military Academy; entered the Royal Artillery, as Lieutenant, 14 February 1883; was Adjutant, Midlothian Artillery (Volunteer), and subsequently Adjutant, Royal Artillery, Isle of Wight, 26 April, 1889 to 25 June 1894; became Captain 1 February 1892. He went to South Africa, as Divisional Adjutant, Royal Artillery, 16 January to 9 August 1900; was Transport Officer 10 August 1900 to 31 October 1901; Extra Staff Officer 1 November 1901 to 5 April, 1902; DAAG 6 April to 25 September 1902. He took part in the operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, February to June, 1900; also in Cape Colony, north of Orange River, June, 1900; in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to September 1900; again in Cape Colony, November 1900, to December 1901; also again during operations in the Transvaal, December 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 17 June, 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. Major Buckle was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1902]: "Christopher Reginald Buckle, Major, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 18 December 1902. He became Major 2 September 1901; was Assistant Military Secretary to Commander, Indian Army Corps; Assistant Military Secretary to Sir Evelyn Wood, GO Commanding-in-Chief, Southern Command, 18 October 1902 to 30 September 1905. When Sir E Wood was in command of the 2nd Army Corps District, he says in 'From Midshipman to Field Marshal' "I took my Senior Aide-de-Camp, who was also Assistant Military Secretary, without ever having seen him, from the recommendation of one of the best senior officers of Garrison Artillery in the district, Colonel W W Smith, writing to him, 'Will you please recommend me a Garrison Artillery Aide-de-Camp? He must be able to ride, and must have a good knowledge of, and be keen about his work'. He named Major C Buckle, DSO". He became Brigade Major, RA, Gibraltar, 10 February 1908, to 10 October 1911; was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 11 October 1911; Lieutenant Colonel Commanding Harwich Defences, 1913; Brigadier General Commanding Harwich Fortress, August 1914; reverted to Lieutenant Colonel to command Howitzer Brigade, BEF, May 1915; promoted to Colonel 11 October 1915; Brigadier General, RA, No 6 Group, Heavy Artillery Reserve, BEF, 26 February to 4 April 1916; Brigadier General, Heavy Artillery, 7th Army Corps, BEF, 5 April to 9 July 1916; Brigadier General, RA, 17th Army Corps, British Armies in France, 10 July 1916 to 6 July 1917; Major General, RA, 2nd Army, British Armies in France, 7 July to 16 November 1917; Major General, RA, British Force in Italy, 12 November 1917. He was promoted Major General 1 January 1919; was created a CMG in 1916, and a CB in 1918. Major General Buckle married, on 13 December 1886, Elizabeth Braithwaite, daughter of Charles Colville Turner, and their children were: Christopher Galbraith, Doris Eden, Phillis Norton, Judith St John and Christian.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
BuckleMatthew PercevalCaptainBUCKLE, MATTHEW PERCEVAL, Captain, was born 29 September 1809, at Wray Cottage, Ambleside, son of Admiral C E and Mrs Buckle, The Red House, Spilsby, Lincolnshire. He was educated at Summerfield, Oxford, and at Winchester, and was gazetted to the Royal West Kent Regiment in April, 1889, becoming Lieutenant in December 1892. From June, 1897 to August 1901, he was Adjutant of his battalion, and was promoted Captain in July 1898. He served in the South African War, and was present at the operations in the Orange Free State in 1900 (severely wounded); operations in the Orange River Colony, including action at Wittebergen; operations in Cape Colony and the Transvaal; later operations in the Orange River Colony, and on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Matthew Perceval Buckle, Captain, Royal West Kent Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". In 1903 he passed out of the Staff College with distinction, and from January 1904 to January 1900 he was Staff Captain (Mobilization) at Headquarters, War Office, and from January 1906 to January 1908, Brigade Major at Aldershot. Major Buckle was a qualified Second Class Interpreter in French, and was appointed in March, 1909, Professor at the Staff College, India, with the temporary rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He later became GSO, 2nd Grade, Staff College, Quetta, from July 1909. He became Major in the Army, March, 1907. On the outbreak of the European War, Major Buckle was on the point of departure for Albania, to take up a Staff appointment at Scutari, for which he had been specially chosen. The orders were, however, cancelled, and he rejoined his regiment, as Second-in-Command, at Richmond Barracks, Dublin, whence he sailed for France on the 13th August 1914. Major Buckle was present at the Retreat from Mons and the Battles of the Marne and the Aisne. He was twice mentioned in Despatches (8 October 1914, and 14 January 1915). He was killed in action near Neuve Chapelle on the 27th October 1914, while in command of his battalion. At this time the Royal West Kents held their position for eight days without losing a trench. The 'Queen's Own Gazette' published the following appreciation written by Brigadier General Grove: "The regiment has sustained a grievous loss in the death of Major Buckle. He was quite the finest type of officer that can be met. Thoroughly knowing his duty, and very strict in the performance of it. he was at the same time always gentle and courteous. He was most conscientious, and never spared himself as long as there was work to be done. It may well be said of him that he was sans peur et sans reproche". Major Buckle's favourite recreations were cricket, shooting, polo and racquets. He was a member of the Army and Navy Club and a Freemason, belonging to the following lodges: Old Wykehamists (London), Shakespeare (Spilsby) and the Baluchistan (Quetta). In 1909, he married Marjorie Ethel, elder daughter of Colonel C A Swan, CMG, and they had two children: Margaret Elizabeth and Peter Claude Matthew (born in May 1914).
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Queen's Own) Royal West Kent Regiment
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