Search:
(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
BuistHerbert John MartinCaptainBUIST, HERBERT JOHN MARTIN, Captain, was born 5 May 1868, son of Major General D S Buist. He was educated at George Watson's College, Edinburgh, and Edinburgh University, and became Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps, 28 July 1891; served on the North-West Frontier, India, 1897, including operations with the Malakand Field Force, 3rd Brigade, and with the Tirah Expeditionary Force. He was mentioned in Despatches 18 March, 1898, and received the Medal with two clasps. Captain Buist served in the South African War, 1899 to 1902. He acted as Secretary to the Principal Medical Officer, Cavalry Division, and General Sir John French's Columns in Cape Colony from June, 1900, to the termination of the South African War, and was present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including actions at Colesberg in January 1900; operations in Cape Colony, June to December 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901 ]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Herbert John Martin Buist, Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 18 December 1902. He was Staff Officer to the Principal Medical Officer, South Africa, 1903 till 1906, in which year on the 1st May he became Deputy Assistant Director-General, War Office, which appointment he held till 30 April, 1910. He had been promoted to Major 28 July 1903, and became Lieutenant Colonel 22 August 1913. He served in the European War; from October 1914, to November 1915, served as Senior Medical Officer, Cape Town Base, during the German South-West operations. Front June, 1916, to May 1917, served as Officer Commanding, 37th British General Hospital, attached to the Royal Serbian Army with the Salonika Force. Acted as ADMS, British Salonika Army, from 1 June to December 1917; promoted Colonel, AMS, 28 December 1917, and appointed DMS, Lines of Communication, Salonika Army, 1 November 1918. Colonel Buist has the Croix de Guerre; the Order of St Sava (2nd Class), and was made Officier, Legion of Honour, 1917. He was mentioned in Despatches. He married, in 1912, Gertrude M K Logan, daughter of J D Logan, JP, of Matjesfontein, Cape Province, South Africa, and they had one son.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
BulkeleyHenry CharlesCaptainBULKELEY, HENRY CHARLES, Major, was born in 1860, son of Major Francis B Bulkeley and Rosanna Marie daughter of Colonel W W J Cockcraft. He served in the South African War, 1900-1; was mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901] "Henry Charles Bulkeley, Captain and Honorary Major, 4th West Yorkshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 29 October 1901. Major Bulkeley retired from the Militia, but rejoined and served in the European War, 1914-18, as Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, and was created a CMG in 1918. He married Gertrude Beatrice, daughter of Admiral Hudson, RN, and they had two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince of Wales's Own) West Yorkshire Regiment
BulmanPhilipMajorBULMAN, PHILIP, Major, was born 3 November 1857, son of John Bulman, of Clifton. He was gazetted to the 85th Foot 11 September 1876, becoming Lieutenant, Shropshire Light Infantry on the same date, and serving in the Afghan War, 1879-80, with the Kurram Division in the Yarmusht Expedition (Medal). He became Captain 4 February 1885; Major 11 February 1894, and was Vice Consul, Asia Minor, 27 November 1895 to 16 October 1897. Major Bulman served in the South African War, 1899-1901, and in command of the 2nd Battalion Shropshire Light Infantry from 1 May to 5 June, 1900, also from 22 January to 13 March, and from 16 May to 4 September 1901. Operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria. Operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including operations at Elands River (4 to 16 August). Operations in Orange River Colony, May to 28 November 1900, including action at Rhenoster River. Operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900. Operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900, to September 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Philip Bulman, Major, Shropshire Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 19 August 1901; was given the Brevet of Colonel 19 August 1904, and retired 24 October 1906, entering the Reserve of Officers.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's) Shropshire Light Infantry
BurnabyHugo BeaumontCaptainBURNABY, HUGO BEAUMONT, Captain, was born 5 May 1874, youngest son of the Reverend Sherrard Beaumont Burnaby, Vicar of Hampstead, London. He was educated at Tippingham, and was engaged in ranching in British Columbia from 1893 to 1899. He served in the South African War, 1900-2, first in the ranks, until commissioned in March, 1901; became Captain in June, 1901, in the 1st Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. lie was mentioned in Despatches; received the Medal, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Hugo Beaumont Burnaby, Captain, 1st Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He married, in 1906, Evelyn Violet, youngest daughter of Major General C H Smith, CB, and they had one son and two daughters. He became a Game Farmer at Wendover, Buckinghamshire. Lieutenant Colonel H B Burnaby served in the European War. He was killed in action in September 1916. DSO, QSA (3) CC OFS Trans (Capt IY), KSA (2), BWM (Lt Col), Victory Medal (Lt Col). Spinks 1963 £24. Lovell 1978 £350. OMRS 1992 £1250.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
1st Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
BurnettJohn ChaplynCaptainBURNETT, JOHN CHAPLYN, Captain, was born 24 December 1863, son of Charles Mountford Burnett and Emily Jane Chaplyn. He was educated privately. He entered the Army 15 February 1884; became Captain, 1893; served in the South African War 1900-1902, as Captain, first in the Pompoms, afterwards as Staff Officer, Dynamite Factory, Middelfontein, near Johannesburg; taking part in the operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria; during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Reit Vlei; during operations in the Transvaal, April to September 1901, and October 1901, to May 1902; during operations in the Orange River Colony; operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "John Chaplyn Burnett, Captain, Royal Garrison Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 18 December 1902; the Warrant sent 6 January 1903. He became Major 1 October 1902, and retired from the Royal Garrison Artillery 5 May 1909, and joined the Reserve of Officers. Major Burnett took part in the European War, 1914-1917. Commanded Garrison Artillery Company at Pembroke Dock, 1914-1915; volunteered for Khartoum, Sudan, 1915; was invalided home. Served in Ministry of Munitions as Safety Service Officer in No 1 NFF, Leeds. DSO, OBE (m), QSA (3) CC OFS Joh (Maj RA), KSA (2) (Capt RGA), BWM. Haywards 1978 £375.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Garrison Artillery
Burnett-StuartJohn TheodosiusLieutenantBURNETT-STUART, JOHN THEODOSIUS, Lieutenant, was born 14 March, 1875, eldest son of E R Burnett-Stuart, JP, DL, of Dens and Crichie, Aberdeenshire. He was educated at Repton and Sandhurst, and joined the Rifle Brigade, as Second Lieutenant, 6 March, 1895; became Lieutenant 26 July 1897; served in the North-West Frontier Expedition, 1897-98 (Medal with clasp); in the South African War, as Divisional Signalling Officer (graded Staff Captain), 4 December 1899 to 7 December 1901, and as Signalling Officer, 8 December 1901 to 30 June, 1902. He took part, in the operations in Cape Colony, south of the Orange River, January to February 1900; in the Relief of Kimberley; operations in Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February), and actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein; operations in Orange River Colony and the Transvaal, May 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "John Theodosius Burnett-Stuart, Lieutenant, Rifle Brigade. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted to Captain 20 February 1901. He was Staff Captain and GSO, 3rd Grade, Headquarters of Army, from 13 February to 23 June, 1908; GSO, 2nd Grade, 24 June 1908 to 12 February 1915. He served in the European War from 1914, as GSO, 2nd Grade, 5 August 1914 to 16 February 1915; GSO, 1st Grade, 27 February 1915 to 1 February 1916; was Brigadier General, General Staff, General Headquarters, British Expeditionary Force, and British Armies in France 2 February 1916 to 3 February 1917; Brigadier General, General Staff, 19th Army Corps, British Armies in France, 9 February to 25 December 1917; Deputy Adjutant-General, General Headquarters, British Armies in France, 26 December 1917. He was mentioned in Despatches; created a CMG, 1916; a CB, 1917; given the Brevet of Colonel, June, 1916, and promoted to Major General 3 June, 1919. In 1904 he married Nina, daughter of Major Nelson, late 5th Dragoon Guards, and they had one son, lain Robert, and two daughters: Elizabeth and Kathron Lilias.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince Consort's Own) Rifle Brigade
BurnhamFrederick RussellMajorBURNHAM, FREDERICK RUSSELL, Major, was born at Tivoli, Minnesota, 11 May 1861, son of the Reverend Edwin O Burnham and Rebecca Burnham (nee Russell). The family removed to Los Angeles in 1870. Fred Burnham was educated at the Clinton High School, and was successively a cowboy, scout, guide, miner, Deputy Sheriff, etc, in the West. In 1884 he married Blanche Blick, of Clinton, Iowa. In 1893 he went to South Africa, and served as a scout in the Matabele War in Rhodesia, which had broken out mainly because the subjects of Lobengula often raided Mashonaland, which the King had ceded to the British. Dr Jameson, the Administrator of Mashonaland, remonstrated with Lobengula, who expressed regret after one of these raids, saying that the chief Lomaghondi (whose territory was under British Protection) had been killed by mistake. In spite of his apologies several other raids occurred, and on 9 July 1893, the impi began to slaughter every Mashoni they could lay hands upon. Since the King thus defied the British it became necessary either to break the power of Lobengula or to evacuate the territory. The former course was decided upon, and about 1,000 or 1,200 white men, led by Dr Jameson, invaded Matabeleland. Lobengula, after being beaten in the battles of the Shangani (25 October 1891) and the Imbembezi (1 November 1891), fled from Bulawayo, and did not surrender himself. A force under Major Patrick Forbes was sent to follow and capture the King. The column could not proceed quickly, owing to bad weather, short rations and the absence of roads, so Major Forbes ordered Major Wilson and 18 men to go forward and reconnoitre. The understanding was that if the party did not return by sundown, it was to be supported by the whole column. This patrol was accompanied by Mr Burnham, the American Scout, "one of the three men who were eyewitnesses of that eventful night's work which ended so tragically at dawn". For his services in the Matabele Campaign, the Government presented Mr Burnham with the Campaign Medal and - jointly with two companions - he was given 300 square miles of land in Rhodesia, in recognition of exceptional service. Mr Burnham discovered in the granite ruins of an ancient civilization of Rhodesia a buried treasure of gold and gold ornaments, dating from before the Christian era. He led an expedition to explore Barotzeland preparatory to the building of the Cape to Cairo Railroad. In the Second Matabele War, Mr Burnham took an active part on the Staff of Sir Frederick Carrington, and was commissioned to capture or kill the Matabele 'God' Umlimo, and succeeded in entering his cave in the Matopa mountains and killing him. He operated mines in Klondyke from 1898 to 1900. In January 1900, the following message reached him: "Burnham, PO Box 62, Skagway, Alaska. Lord Roberts appoints you to his personal Staff. All expenses paid. If you accept, start shortest way Cape Town, and report yourself to him.—Captain White, Naval and Military Club, London". On his arrival in South Africa, Mr Burnham was appointed to Lord Roberta's Staff, and was made Chief of Scouts of the British Armies in the Field in South Africa. Lieutenant General Sir Aylmer Hunter-Weston, KCB, DSO, writes: "The address of my friend, Major Fred Burnham, DSO, the celebrated Scout, is La Cuesta (The Slope), Three Rivers, California. He is an American who came over to fight for us in the Boer War, and did invaluable work there for England. For his services he was made a Major and given the DSO". Queen Victoria showed much appreciation of Major Burnham's services to the British Empire, as will be seen from the following letters received by the famous American Scout on his arrival in London: Osborne, 24 July 1900. Dear Sir, The Queen would much like to see you if you could come here some day. But as it is understood your health has suffered by your hard work in South Africa, Her Majesty desires me first to ascertain whether you are in a condition to travel. Perhaps you might sleep at Portsmouth and come across in the morning. If you are to be in England some time, you might possibly prefer to delay your visit here. But Her Majesty only wishes to consider your convenience in the event of your being able to come. Yours very faithfully, Arthur Bigge, Private Secretary Osborne, 27 July 1900. Dear Sir, It would give the Queen much pleasure to receive you on Monday, the 6th of August, at about 6 pm, and the Prince of Wales would be very glad to see you the same day. Will you give my wife and me the pleasure of your company at Albert Cottage, which is within the grounds, for Monday night? There are boats which run from either Portsmouth or Southampton to Cowes. I will let you know later on about the hour at which the Prince of Wales would receive you. Yours very truly, Arthur Bigge. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Frederick Russell Burnham, Local Major. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". Major Burnham was invested with the Insignia by the King 17 December 1901. Major Burnham has the following Memorandum: "Frederick Russell Burnham, Esquire, Local Major in South Africa, was made a Member of the Distinguished Service Order on the 26th day of September 1901.—St John Brodrick, The Principal Secretary of State having the Department of War for the time being". Major Burnham also received the South African Medal with five clasps. In 1902 he made surveys of the Volter River in West Africa, exploring parts of the French Nigeria Hinterland of the Gold Coast Colony, and he took an active part in native troubles of that time; commanded an exploration of magnitude from Lake Rudolph to German East Africa, covering a vast region along the Congo basin and head of the Nile, 1903-4. He discovered a lake of 49 square miles, composed almost entirely of carbonate of soda, of unknown depth. Major Burnham has been associated with the Honourable John Hays Hammond in his mining interests since 1905. He was one of the eighteen officers selected by Roosevelt to raise volunteers for service in France in 1917. The account of the killing of Umlimo by Major Burnham was published in the 'Daily Telegraph', 1896 or 1897, by permission of Earl Grey, who was then Administrator of Rhodesia, and it is on a copy of Major Burnham's reports to Earl Grey that Sir H Rider Haggard wrote a description of Wilson's last stand, in Longman's 'Real True Story Book', published in 1894. Sir H Rider Haggard, says Major Burnham, "might have a copy, but mine was destroyed by Indians in our fighting in Mexico". When Richard Raiding Davis selected six men as typical real soldiers of fortune, Major Burnham was one of them. He modestly says himself that what he did fell far short of what he might have done, but that Lord Roberts and all the men with whom he worked, whatever his shortcomings were, were still his friends, and this is the list of some of them: General Carrington, General Baden-Powell, Colonel the Honourable Maurice Gifford, Colonel Hume, General Hunter-Weston, Cecil Rhodes and the romantic soldier, Major Allan Wilson. "Yet I feel that all our little wars, sieges and combats sink into such insignificance compared with what is being done now, that, it seems a little presumptuous to have anything more than a bare mention in such a book as you are preparing".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Staff
BustonPhilip ThomasLieutenant ColonelBUSTON, PHILIP THOMAS, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 16 February 1853.  He was educated at Cheltenham College, and was gazetted to the Royal Engineers 12 September 1872, and served in the Afghan War, 1878-79-80, being present at the action of Charasiah and operations in the neighbourhood of Kabul in December 1879 (Despatches [London Gazette, 4 May 1880]; Medal with two clasps).  He became Captain 12 September 1884.  Captain Buston served in the Hazara Expedition in 1888; was mentioned in Despatches; received the Medal with clasp, and was given the Brevet of Major 7 December 1888.  For his services in the Hazara Expedition of 1891, he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 20 October 1891], and received a clasp.  He was promoted to Major 16 March, 1892, and to Lieutenant Colonel 20 September 1899, and from 1899 to 1902 he served in the South African War as CRE, Infantry Division, afterwards CRE, Bloemfontein.  He was present at the relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, including operations at Paardeberg and action at Driefontein.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Philip Thomas Buston, Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Engineers.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented to him by Lieutenant General Sir C Tucker, KCB, 9 November 1901.  He was given the Brevet of Colonel 20 September 1903: became Colonel 21 August 1905, and was created a CB in 1906.  Colonel Buston was appointed Chief Engineer, Aldershot Command, 21 August 1905.  He retired February 1910, and was given the honorary rank of Brigadier General 24 August 1912.  General Buston served in the European War from 1914 to 1918, and was created a CMG in 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
ByronRichardCaptainBYRON, RICHARD, Captain, was born 19 February 1870, at Secunderabad, India, eldest, son of Major General John Byron.  He was educated at Wellington College and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and was gazetted to the King's Royal Rifle Corps 7 May 1890.  He served in the Hazara Expedition, 1891 (Medal with clasp); in the Miranzai Expedition, 1891 (clasp).  He became Lieutenant 23 November 1892, and served in the Isazai Expedition, 1892.  He served with the Chitral Relief Force, 1896 (Medal with clasp), and was promoted to Captain 27 January 1898.  He was Adjutant, Militia, 16 August 1899, to 15 August 1904.  Captain Byron served in the South African War, 1900-1, as Adjutant, 9th Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps, and was present at the operations in the Orange Free State, April to May 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, February to April, 1900; operations in the Transvaal, May and June, 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, November 1900 to May 1901; operations in Cape Colony, June and July 1901.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Medal and four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Richard Byron, Captain, King's Royal Rifle Corps.  In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901.  He was promoted to Major 7 October 1905, and retired 23 January 1909, joining the Reserve of Officers.  In 1913 he was appointed to command the 5th Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps.  He served in the European War, 1914 to 1919; was mentioned in Despatches, and given the Brevet of Colonel (1917).  He commanded the Medway Reserve Brigade, 1916 to April 1919.  Colonel Byron married, in 1896, Mabel Mackenzie, daughter of C A Winter, of 33, Hyde Park Square, London, and they had one son, Second Lieutenant R G Byron, 4th Dragoon Guards, born on 3 November 1899, and one daughter, Sheila Margaret.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Royal Rifle Corps
CameronAllanLieutenantCAMERON, ALLAN, Lieutenant, was born 4 November 1878, and entered the Gordon Highlanders from the Militia, becoming Lieutenant. He served, with distinction in the South African War, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Allan Cameron, Lieutenant, Gordon Highlanders. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa (since killed in action)". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to his father.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Gordon Highlanders
CameronGeorge WCaptainCAMERON, GEORGE W, Captain, was born at Thurso, Quebec, Canada, son of John Archibald Cameron. He was educated at Woodstock College, Ontario, and began his military career in the 5th Royal Scots, the Highland Regiment of Montreal, in 1887, which he eventually commanded. He became Captain in 1891, and Major in 1897. He saw active service in the South African War as a Lieutenant in Lord Strathcona's Corps, taking part in the operations in Natal in May and June, 1900, and serving in the Orange River Colony and Transvaal till May 1902. He was promoted to Captain in March 1900, and received the Medal with clasps; was promoted Major in December 1901, and Honorary Major in the Army in September 1901, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "George W Cameron, Captain, Lord Strathcona's Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to the Colonial Office for transmission to Canada 1 November 1901, and presented by Lieutenant Colonel A Roy 27 November 1901. Lieutenant Colonel Cameron, who served on the permanent staff of the Canadian Mounted Artillery, was an enthusiastic rifleman, a keen supporter of cross-country riding, and fond of most outdoor sports. He died 28 August 1907, in Winnipeg. In an obituary notice in the 'Times' of 12 September 1907, his name is given as George H Cameron.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Canada contingent
CampbellDuncan FrederickLieutenantCAMPBELL, DUNCAN FREDERICK, Lieutenant, was born 28 April, 1876. He was gazetted to the Lancashire Fusiliers, 23 November 1898; became Lieutenant 27 September 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1901, and was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 17 to 24 January 1900 (wounded, 20 January), and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz. Operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900. Operations in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June). Operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900. Operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900. Operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to January 1901. Served as Adjutant, 2nd Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers. He was mentioned in Despatches (Sir R H Buller, 30 March, 19 June and 19 November 1900 [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]); received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Duncan Frederick Campbell, Lieutenant, Lancashire Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted to Captain 5 October 1901; transferred to the Royal Highlanders 13 June, 1908. He was Adjutant, Volunteers, 6 May 1904 to 31 March 1908, and Adjutant, Territorial Force, 1 April 1908. He retired 13 July 1910. Captain Campbell served during the European War, as Lieutenant Colonel, Territorial Force Battalion West Riding Regiment. He died 4 September 1916, and was buried at Kilmarnock, several prominent Unionists attending his funeral. An obituary notice said: "We regret to announce the death, after a few days' illness, of Colonel Duncan F Campbell, who had represented North Ayrshire in the Unionist interest since 1911. He entered the House of Commons in that year, at a by-election, defeating Mr A M Anderson (now Lord Anderson), who sought re-election on being appointed Solicitor-General. Colonel Campbell, who was born in 1876, entered the Black Watch in 1908, and fought through the South African War from 1899 to 1901. He was in the operations for the relief of Ladysmith, and afterwards took part in many other famous actions. He did not escape scathless. He recovered, however, from his wounds, won the DSO, and had also the Queen's Medal with six clasps. He was thrice mentioned in the Despatches of Sir Redvers Buller. Colonel Campbell, who had retired in 1910, rejoined his old regiment for the war with Germany, and saw much service. For a time he was attached to the Gordon Highlanders, and afterwards received the rank of Lieutenant Colonel for service with the Duke of Wellington's Regiment - the West Ridings. His death recalls an interesting incident in the House of Commons in January last, when the gallant officer entered an indignant protest against what he termed 'the voluminous verbiage' of a group of members below the Ministerial gangway. 'Get on with the war' he demanded, 'and finish everything that interferes with the progress of the war'. 'If I had had the member for Hanley (Mr Outhwaite) in my battalion, 'he added', he would have been strung up by the thumbs before he had been there half an hour'. Mr Outhwaite inquired: 'How many of your battalion would it take to do it?' Colonel Campbell replied: 'I would leave that task to myself, even though I have only one arm, having lost, the use of the other in a task which the member for Hanley would not think of attempting or daring to risk', a statement which naturally evoked loud cheers".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Lancashire Fusiliers
CampbellDuncan LornSecond LieutenantCAMPBELL, DUNCAN LORN, Second Lieutenant, was born 12 June, 1881, son of Major General Lorn Campbell, CB. He was educated at the United Services College, Westward Ho! and was gazetted to the Welsh Regiment, serving in South Africa, 1900-1. He was mentioned in Despatches, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 5 July 1901]: "Duncan Lorn Campbell, the Welsh Regiment. For the defence of a train near Alkmaar, on the 20th May 1901, with four men against 50 Boers at close quarters. Dated 20 May 1901". Captain D L Campbell served in the European War, 1914-17.
DSO, QSA (3) CC OFS Trans (Lt Welsh Regt). Glendinings 1996 £900.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Welsh Regiment
CampbellJohnCaptainCAMPBELL, JOHN EDWARD ROBERT, Major and Honourable Lieutenant Colonel, was born 20 July 1855, the eldest son of George Campbell, of Duntroon, New South Wales, and Marrianne Collinson, only daughter of E C Close, formerly Lieutenant, 48th Regiment of Foot. He was educated privately, and at Jesus College, Cambridge, and entered the Militia, becoming Lieutenant 6 December 1876. He was promoted Captain 19 January 1884, and Major 8 May 1895. He served in the South African War, 1900-1; was appointed Commandant, Prisoners of War, on board the City of Cambridge, at Simon's Town; but on the prisoners being sent to St Helena, he rejoined his battalion, and proceeded with it to the scene of operations in the Orange Free State. He was appointed Commandant at Sanna's Post, and continued to hold that appointment until ordered to bring his battalion back to England. He was mentioned in Despatches; awarded the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "John Edward Robert Campbell, Major and Honourable Lieutenant Colonel, 6th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 11 December 1902; retired with honorary rank of Colonel in 1903. Colonel Campbell was a Deputy Lieutenant and Justice of the Peace for Herefordshire. He was appointed Military Representative, and subsequently National Service Representative, for the Leominster Rural District of Herefordshire, during the Great War, 1914-18, and received the thanks of the respective authorities for his services. He married, in 1881, Helen, youngest daughter of Richard Spooner, HEICS; they had two sons: Donald Neil (Lieutenant, RASC, MT), and George Cecil (Captain, Royal Engineers), and one daughter, Winifred Helen.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Queen's Own) Cameron Highlanders
CampbellJohn Edward RobertMajorCAMPBELL, JOHN, Captain and Brevet Major, was born 7 March, 1871, son of Captain W H Campbell, Madras Staff Corps, and of Ellen Magdalena, eldest daughter of Major General J D Mein, Madras Royal Horse Artillery. He was educated at Haileybury, and entered the Army from Sandhurst 7 January 1892; posted to the 79th Cameron Highlanders; was promoted Captain, April, 1898: served in the Sudan, 1898; was present at the actions of Atbara and Omdurman; was mentioned twice in Despatches [London Gazette, 24 May and 30 September 1898]; was promoted Brevet Major, and awarded the British Medal, and Khedive's Medal with two clasps; was Adjutant, 1st Cameron Highlanders, 1 February 1898 to 4 December 1900; Staff College, 1901-3; Staff Captain, War Office, April 1904 to December 1905; Brigade Major, Aldershot, December 1905 to April 1908; Chief Instructor, School of Musketry, Hythe, June 1909 to June 1913. He served in South Africa, 1900-1, as Adjutant, 1st Battalion Cameron Highlanders, March to September 1900, and 1 June to 5 December 1901; during operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; taking part in the operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); during operations in Orange River Colony, May to September 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July), and Ladybrand (2 to 7 September); during operations in the Transvaal, June to December 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; awarded the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "John Campbell, Captain and Brevet Major, Cameron Highlanders. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 12 March, 1902; the Warrant sent 19 March, 1902. He was promoted Major 9 March, 1905, and Brevet Lieutenant Colonel 21 February 1914. He commanded the 2nd Cameron Highlanders May 1914, to May 1915; wounded at Hooge 10 May 1915; appointed Temporary Brigadier General commanding 121st Brigade 7 October 1915 to April, 1918, and attained the substantive rank of Lieutenant Colonel, 1916. He was created a CMG 1915; awarded the Order of St Stanislaus, 3rd Class, with Swords, August 1915; promoted Brevet Colonel, January 1917; created a CB January 1918; appointed Temporary Major General commanding 32nd Division, April, 1918; transferred to command 31st Division, May 1918 to March, 1919. Mentioned in Despatches seven times; Commaudeur de l'Ordre de la Couronne and Croix de Guerre (Belgian), March, 1919; appointed Temporary Brigadier General commanding 1st Highland Brigade in Germany, March, 1919 to 31 October 1919; appointed Brigadier General commanding 11th Infantry Brigade 1 November 1919; promoted Colonel, June, 1919; Commandeur de la Legion d'Honneur, October 1919. Colonel Campbell married, in 1901, Amy Leighton, third daughter of the Reverend Canon Hopkins.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Warwickshire Regiment
CampbellJohn HayCaptainCAMPBELL, JOHN HAY, Captain, was born in Edinburgh 31 December 1871, son of Major General Thomas Hay Campbell, RA. He was educated at Linton House School, and at St Mary's Hospital, London; matriculated at the London University, 1888; became MRCS (England) and LRCP (London), 1894, and was gazetted to the Royal Army Medical Corps as Lieutenant 29 July 1895; was promoted to Captain 29 July 1898. In the South African War he served with the 3rd King's Royal Rifle Corps from December 1899 to October 1900, during operations in Natal, 1899; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; during operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 1900 (severely wounded 24 February); during operations in the Transvaal, July to October 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches (Sir R H Buller, 30 March and 9 November 1900 [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]); received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "John Hay Campbell, Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The decoration was awarded for meritorious services whilst in medical charge of 3rd King's Royal Rifles. The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief, South Africa, and were presented by the OC, Secunderabad District, 7 March, 1902. Captain Campbell was promoted to Major, AMC, 29 April, 1907; became Lieutenant Colonel 1 March, 1915, and a Medical Officer, London Recruiting Area. He married, in 1895, Clara Edith, daughter of James Hedley, Richmond, Yorkshire.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
CampbellJohn VaughanLieutenantCAMPBELL, JOHN VAUGHAN, Lieutenant, served in the South African War, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "John Vaughan Campbell, Lieutenant, Coldstream Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 18 December 1902. Lieutenant Colonel J V Campbell served in the European War, and was awarded the Victoria Cross in 1916, and created a CMG in 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Coldstream Guards
CampbellMontagu DouglasMajorCAMPBELL, MONTAGU DOUGLAS, Major and Honorary Lieutenant Colonel, was born 16 October 1852, youngest son of Archibald Campbell, of Mains and Blythswood. He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, as Commandant, America Siding. Operations in Cape Colony and Orange Free State, February to May 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to July 1901; operations in Cape Colony, July 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal and four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Montagu Douglas Campbell, Major and Honorary Lieutenant Colonel, 4th Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. Lieutenant Colonel Campbell was a Justice of the Peace, County Renfrew. He died on the 12th of February 1916.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Princess Louise's) Sutherland and Argyll Highland
CampbellWalterCaptainCAMPBELL, WALTER Captain and Brevet Major, was born 30 July 1864, son of John Campbell, of Rathfern, County Antrim. He was educated at Wellington, and at Trinity College, Cambridge; graduated BA 1885; joining the Gordon Highlanders as Second Lieutenant, 5 February 1887. He was promoted Lieutenant, December 1890, and served with the Waziristan Field Force from 1894 to 1895 (Medal with clasp). He took part, in the operations of the Chitral Relief Force in 1895, and was in the storming of the Malakand Pass (Medal with clasp). From 31 January 1896 to 20 January 1899, he was Adjutant to the Gordon Highlanders; was promoted Captain 11 January 1897; Major 28 April, 1906; Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1907, and Colonel 19 July 1911. He accompanied the Tirah Expeditionary Force (1897-98); was present at the actions at Dargai and Sampagha and Arhanga; he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 1 March and 5 April, 1898], received Brevet of Major, with two clasps. Major Campbell served with great distinction throughout the South African War (1899-1902), with the 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders. He was subsequently transferred to the Highland Brigade as Brigade Major, and finally appointed DAAG Army Headquarters, taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including action at Magersfontein; during operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein and Vet River (5 and 6 May); during operations in the Transvaal, east and west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; during operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); in the operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899—1900; in the operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River. Taking part in the operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902; he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902], and awarded the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Walter Campbell, Captain and Brevet Major, Gordon Highlanders. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by King Edward VII 24 October 1902; the Warrant sent 4 November 1902. From 19 October 1902, to 17 May 1903, Major Campbell was DAAG to the 3rd Army Corps, when he was posted as DAQMG at the War Office. He was appointed in 1904 Deputy Assistant Director of Movements at the War Office, remaining in the post until 5 October 1908. General Staff Officer, 2nd Grade, Aldershot Command, 1908 to 1911; AQMG, Scottish Command, 1911 to 1914. During the European War Colonel Campbell rendered valuable service to the nation. In the opening months he acted as AA and QMG, becoming DA and QMG, Temporary Brigadier General, 1 October 1914, and Temporary Major General, 13 July 1915. In October 1915, he was appointed DQMG. He was mentioned eleven times in Despatches, created a CB in 1915, KCMG in 1917, and KCB in 1919, and became Major General 1 January 1910. In 1904 he married Gladys Isabella, eldest daughter of Major Lutley Jordan, late 34th Regiment. They had two daughters.
KCB (m), KCMG, DSO, IGS 1854 ‘Waziristan 1894-5', IGS 1895 RofC P-F Tirah, QSA (5), CC Paard Drief Trans Witt (Major), KSA (2) (Maj DSO), 1911 Police Coronation Medal, Order of the Redeemer (Greece) 2nd Class, Order of Al Nahda (Jordan) 2nd Class, Legion d'Honneur (France) 3rd Class, Order of the Nile (Egypt) 3rd Class. Gordon Highlander Museum, Aberdeen 2001.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Gordon Highlanders
CampbellWilliam RobinsonLieutenantCAMPBELL, WILLIAM ROBINSON, Lieutenant, was born 26 November 1876, eldest son of Sir Charles Campbell, 10th Baronet. On 11 February 1899, he entered the Army as a Second Lieutenant in the 14th Hussars, in which he was promoted Lieutenant 13 December 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; in the operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900) and action at Pieter's Hill; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including action at Houtnek (Thoba Mountain) and Zand River; in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 Nov 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August); in operations in the Transvaal, 30 November 1900 to June 1901; in Orange River Colony, February to 31 May 1902; on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in September 1901. He served as Adjutant of the 14th Hussars from 12 August 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901 and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with seven clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "William Robinson Campbell, Lieutenant, 14th Hussars. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was employed as Adjutant of the 14th Hussars until 11 August 1904; was promoted Captain 30 May 1904, and was Adjutant of Imperial Yeomanry 10 Sept 1908 to 31 March 1908, and in the Territorial Force 1 April 1908 to 2 March 1911. He attained his Majority 22 February 1911. Major Campbell served in the European War, and was killed in action in Flanders on 13 May 1915. He had married, in 1907, Maud Kathleen, youngest daughter of Captain S Y H Davenport, 47th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
14th (The King's) Hussars
Page 8 of 59
<<First <Prev 6 78 9 10 Next> Last>>