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 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
CannyJames Clare MacnamaraSecond LieutenantCANNY, JAMES CLARE MACNAMARA, Second Lieutenant, was born 6 December 1877, son of James Macnamara Canny. He was gazetted to the Royal Munster Fusiliers 20 May 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as Station Staff Officer, taking part in operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including the action at Rhenoster Kop; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Lindley (26 June), Bethlehem (6 and 7 July) and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900, to July 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, May 1901; operations in Cape Colony, July 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901 and 25 April, 1902], received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "James Clare Macnamara Canny, Second Lieutenant, Royal Munster Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. He was promoted to Lieutenant 7 July 1901; was Adjutant, Royal Munster Fusiliers, 9 February 1907 to 15 September 1908; Captain, Royal Munster Fusiliers, 13 June 1908, and Army Service Corps 23 September 1908. He served in the European War, 1914-18 was promoted to Major, Royal Army Service Corps, 30 October 1914; was Temporary Lieutenant Colonel 8 April, 1915, to 31 December 1917. He was mentioned in Despatches and given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1918; was Assistant Director of Transport, Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force from 19 March, 1918; was created a CBE in 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Munster Fusiliers
CapeCharles ScarvellLieutenantCAPE, CHARLES SCARVELL, Lieutenant, was born 3 July 1866, son of William Frederick Cape, of Sydney. He was educated in Sydney; joined the Australian Military Forces, and served in the South African War, 1899-1901; was mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Charles Scarvell Cape, Lieutenant, New South Wales Mounted Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 25 July 1901. He was promoted to Captain. Captain Cape married, in 1906, Maude, daughter of George Frederick Want.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
New South Wales contingent
CapelAlgernon EssexCaptainCAPELL, ALGERNON ESSEX, Captain, was born at Tottehall, near Wolverhampton, 1 November 1869 (a member of the Essex family of Capell, direct line), and was educated at Felsted School. He joined the Cape Mounted Rifles as a trooper in 1889, and remained in the corps till 1899, when he joined Bethune's Mounted Infantry as Lieutenant, having served through Pondoland at the annexation. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and was promoted to Captain in 1900 "for gallantry in the field" at Scheeper's Nek. He joined the SAC in 1900, and was promoted to Major in 1902; was mentioned in Despatches (twice by General Buller and once each by Lord Roberts and Lord Kitchener), and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Algernon Essex Capel, Captain, Bethune's Mounted Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent, to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented by the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 August 1901. Major Capell was "ejected from the SAC by the Boer Government of 1908". He was appointed Assistant District Commissioner, Dagoretti, British East Africa; Chief of Police, Grenada, 1910-12 (awarded King's Police Medal), and Assistant Commissioner, British South Africa Police, in Southern Rhodesia, since 1913. He served in the European War from 1914; commanded a column to German South-West Africa; captured Shuckmansburg, the capital of Caprivi Zippel strip of German territory; given command in December 1914, of the 2nd Rhodesian Regiment, with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; was mentioned in Despatches by General Smuts, and received the Croix de Guerre. Major Capell has "devoted most of his life to big game and other shooting when on leave". He married, in 1903, Lois Ethel, daughter of W Slatter, of Stratton, Cirencester, and they had one son and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bethune's Mounted Infantry
CapperThompsonMajorCAPPER, THOMPSON, Major and Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, was born 20 October 1863, son of W Copeland Capper, ICS. He joined the Army as a Lieutenant in the East Lancashire Regiment 9 September 1882, and was promoted Captain 22 April, 1891, serving as Adjutant 29 October 1890 to 28 October 1894. He served during the operations in Chitral, 1895, with the Relief Force (Medal with clasp); was employed with the Egyptian Army 31 December 1897 to 14 July 1899; served with the Nile Expedition, 1898, with Egyptian Army; was present in the battles of the Atbara and Khartoum (Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898]; Brevet of Major 16 November 1898; Egyptian Medal with two clasps; Medal). Served with the Nile Expedition, 1899 (clasp to Egyptian Medal). During the South African War he was Staff Captain (Intelligence), Headquarters of Army, 15 July to 12 November 1899; DAAG, 13 November 1899 to 19 October 1900; Staff Officer and AAG 20 October 1900 to 1 April, 1902. He became Major 5 December 1901; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; in the operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; and in the operations on Tugela Heights, 14 to 27 February 1900, and action at Pieter's Hill; in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); during the operations in Orange Free State and Transvaal; also in Cape Colony, January 1901 to 31 May 1902; in command of a Mobile Column (24 June, 1901, to end of operations) (Despatches: Sir R H Buller, 3 February, 30 March, 19 June and 9 November 1900 [London Gazette, 8 February 1901, and 29 July 1902]; Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 29 November 1900; Queen's Medal with six clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Thompson Capper, Major and Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, The East Lancashire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was Professor at the Staff College, 23 December 1902 to 2 February 1904, and DAAG at the Staff College 3 February 1904 to 22 December 1905. He was given his Brevet Colonelcy 11 December 1904, and became Colonel 31 March, 1906, on taking up the appointment of Commandant at the Indian Staff College. He was created a CB in 1910; was given the command of the 13th Infantry Brigade, 1911; became Inspector General of Infantry in 1914. He commanded the 7th Division in the European War; became Major General 12 May 1914 and was created a KCMG for his services. Major General Sir Thompson Capper died 27 September 1915, of wounds received the previous day. He had married, in 1908, the daughter of the Honourable R Gerard, of Wrightington Hall, Lancashire.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
East Lancashire Regiment
CardewGeorge HerewardMajorCARDEW, GEORGE HEREWARD, Major, was born 3 January 1861, at Kingsclere, Woodlands, Hampshire, eldest son of Reverend George Cardew, of St Minver, East Liss. He was educated at Haileybury College, and joined the Army, from the Militia, as a Lieutenant in the 18th Hussars, 9 August 1882; became Captain 7 July 1886. He was Deputy Assistant Commissary-General, Commissariat and Transport Staff, 21 October 1887 to 10 December 1888; was attached to the Army Service Corps 11 December 1888; transferred to the Army Service Corps 1 April 1889, and promoted Major 17 April, 1898. He served in the South African War, 1900-2, on the Staff; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, including actions at Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; served during the operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria, and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); was present during the operations in Orange River Colony, including actions at Wittebergen, July 1900; also in Cape Colony, March 1900; took part in the operations in the Transvaal, December 1900 and May 1902; in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to January 1902; also in Cape Colony, February to March, 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches by Lord Kitchener [London Gazette, 17 June, 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1902 ]: "George Hereward Cardew, Major, Army Service Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC, Straits Settlements, 23 January 1902; presented by Brigadier General Dorward 17 April, 1903. He became Lieutenant Colonel 1 November 1905, and was given the Brevet of Colonel 1 November 1908, and retired 23 April, 1911. Colonel Cardew served in the European War, rejoining in 1914, and holding the position of AQMG, Eastern Army, till 1916. Subsequently he became Group Commander of a Labour Corps for overseas service 13 February 1917, and he served with the British Expeditionary Force in France in 1917 and 1918, being mentioned for valuable services. He was made a CBE in 1919. He married, in 1888, Emmeline Marian, daughter of John Bolster Burchell, BA TD, and they had one son.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Army Service Corps
Cardigan, Earl ofGeorge William ChandosCaptainCARDIGAN, EARL OF, GEORGE WILLIAM CHANDOS (MARQUESS OF AILESBURY), Captain, was born 21 May 1873, son of the Most Honourable Henry Augustus Brudenell-Bruee, 5th Marquess and a Baronet, and Sophia Maria, daughter of G H Pinckney, of Tawstock Court, Barnstaple. He was educated at Westminster, and joined the 3rd Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, afterwards serving for some time with the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry, with which members of his family have been identified ever since its formation more than a century ago. In November 1899, Lord Cardigan went to India, and it was whilst he was engaged in big game shooting that the storm-cloud burst over South Africa, Lord Cardigan, who held a commission in the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry and had been ADC to Lord Wolseley in 1898, at once volunteered his military services, which were accepted. He was employed with the transport, department of the Natal Field Force from 23 October 1899, up to the Relief of Ladysmith, and underwent all the privations and hard fighting in connection with that memorable siege. After the Siege of Ladysmith had been raised, Lord Cardigan took an active part in the operations which followed; attached to the 3rd Battalion of Imperial Yeomanry (Sherwood Foresters) for a short time, under Colonel Younghusband. He was employed in March, 190O, in connection with the operations around Barkly West. He was next in charge of Major General Smith-Dorrien's transport, in the advance from Kronstad to Pretoria (part of General Sir Ian Hamilton's force). Sir lan Hamilton wrote: "As to Bester's Farm, he ought to know more about it than anyone. I remember well his cutting-out expeditions with his wood-cutters, and very gallant expeditions they were". He continued with General Smith-Dorrien until August. He also took part in the exciting operations which were organized under Lord Kitchener in pursuit of De Wet, and in the Relief of Colonel Hore's force, at Elands River. For his services in this campaign, Lord Cardigan received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], and, on the recommendation of the Field Marshal Commanding-in-Chief in South Africa, was given a commission in the Regular Army, dated 29 August 1900, in the 11th Hussars, which a former Lord Cardigan had led in the Charge of the Light Brigade at Balaklava. After being gazetted to the 11th Hussars, Lord Cardigan was temporarily attached to Paget's force, near Warmbaths, in September 1901. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "George William Chandos, Earl of Cardigan, Captain, Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry Cavalry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 29 October 1901. He became Major in Wiltshire Yeomanry, 1903; ADC to Sir A Hunter, 1903; Major in the Middlesex Yeomanry from 1908; transferred to infantry end of 1914; trained a month with 2nd Irish Guards; posted to 8th Battalion Wiltshire Regiment (New Armies); was Second-in-Command to that battalion when it was formed into a depot unit, when he transferred to ASC From November 1915, till the division was broken up in March 1919 was Second-in-Command of Guards' Divisional Train, and OC Headquarters Company. Since that same date, he was attached to the Northern Divisional Train.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Yeomanry
CaringtonRupert Clement GeorgeLieutenant ColonelCARINGTON, THE HONOURABLE RUPERT CLEMENT GEORGE, Lieutenant Colonel, born 18 December 1852, was brother of the Marquess of Lincolnshire, and son of the second Lord Carington. He was educated at Eton, and entered the Grenadier Guards 28 October 1871; contested Buckinghamshire in 1876; served in the Zulu War, 1879, and Boer War (Medal and clasp); was MP (L) for Buckinghamshire, 1880-5; contested Wycombe, 1885; commanded the 3rd New South Wales Imperial Bushmen in South Africa, 1901-2, taking part in the operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony, 1901; operations in Cape Colony, 1901-2. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 20 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal and five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "The Honourable Rupert Clement George Carington, Lieutenant Colonel, 3rd New South Wales Imperial Bushmen. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted Colonel, and was created a CVO in 1905. He married, in 1891, Edith (who died in 1908), daughter of John S Horsfall, of Widgiewa, New South Wales, and they had one son, Rupert Victor John Carington.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
New South Wales contingent
CarletonGuy AudouinMajorCARLETON, GUY AUDOUIN, Major, was born 23 November 1859, at Bangalore, India, son of Colonel George Carleton, RA. He was educated at Rugby School; entered the Army 14 January 1880: became Lieutenant, Royal Lancaster Regiment, 1 July 1881; Captain 21 May 1888; was DAAG, Intelligence, Headquarters of Army, 24 May 1898 to 21 October 1899, and was promoted to Major 25 November 1899. Major Carleton served in the South African War, 1899-1902; was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1902]: "Guy Audouin Carleton, Major, The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested with the DSO by the King 18 December 1902. Major Carleton retired 23 November 1907. In 1917 he married Adela Dorothy Webb, widow of Captain C W Webb, The Prince of Wales's North Staffordshire Regiment, of Elford House, near Tamworth, Staffordshire, and daughter of Colonel Arthur Blundell, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment).
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Royal Lancaster Regiment
CarletonLancelot RichardCaptainCARLETON, LANCELOT RICHARD, Captain, was born 15 September 1861, fourth son of Colonel G Carleton, RA. He was educated at Rugby School; Cheltenham College and Sandhurst; entered the Essex Regiment 10 May 1882, as Lieutenant; was Adjutant, Essex Regiment, 15 September 1886 to 14 September 1890, and became Captain 1 July 1888. He was DAAG, North-Western District, 14 August 1897 to 17 December 1899. Captain Carleton served in the South African War, as Brigade Major, Infantry Brigade, 18 December 1899 to 11 April, 1901; as DAAG 12 April 1901 to 23 June 1902; as DAAG 24 June to 22 October 1902. He took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including action at Karee Siding, Vet River (6 May) and Zand River; served during the operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including action near Johannesburg; again in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 17 June 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1902]: "Lancelot Richard Carleton, Captain, Essex Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 18 December 1902. He was promoted to Major 16 May 1902; was Officer, Company of Gentleman Cadets, Royal Military College, 16 August 1907 to 7 August 1908; Commander, Company of Gentleman Cadets, Royal Military College, 27 January 1904 to 17 April, 1906. He became Lieutenant Colonel 16 May 1910, and Colonel 16 December 1913. He retired 15 September 1918, with the honorary rank of Brigadier General.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Essex Regiment
CarterAubrey JohnLieutenantCARTER, AUBREY JOHN, Lieutenant, was born 18 January 1872, son of T A Carter, of Shottery Hall, Stratford-on-Avon. He was gazetted to the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment 9 January 1892; was promoted to Lieutenant 1 May 1893; was Adjutant, North Lancashire Regiment, 2 April to 17 May 1898, and became Captain 20 February 1901. He served in the South African War, as a Railway Staff Officer from 6 December 1899 to 2 March, 1900; and as a Brigade Signalling Officer from 7 October 1900 to 2 March 1901, and took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; operation in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 20 November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, including action at Lindley (26 June); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to March 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Aubrey John Carter, Lieutenant, North Lancashire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operation in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901; From 16 December 1905 to December 1909, he was an Instructor at the School of Musketry, where—with Lieutenant Colonel Norman McMahon—he was mainly responsible for the revolution in the musketry training of the Army, and in July 1911, was appointed Commandant of the School of Musketry, South Africa, with the temporary rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He had become Major in February 1910. His services at the School of Musketry in South Africa were acknowledged in the following extract from a letter signed by Lord Gladstone: "In a special measure Ministers ask me to record their grateful acknowledgment of the services rendered by Lieutenant Colonel Carter, Commandant, School of Musketry, Tempe, and his Staff". He was given charge of Musketry in the Irish Command, and eventually proceeded to France to take command of the 1st Battalion Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. He led it in a charge thus described by a brother officer: "The men mean business this time. I looked into their faces and could see a sort of dull fierce look. After the many days of being cooped up in the trenches before we ever arrived in this portion of the theatre of war, it was a real joy to them to be on the move and on the attack. They longed to get at them, and gradually, without a word of command being given, you could hear the click of the bayonet as each man fastened it to his rifle. Suddenly the cry arose: 'Come on, my lads, now for the trenches' The cry went along the line. Every one started yelling above the din of battle. We charged, yelling, shouting, screaming, rushing madly forward at the enemy. How it looked from the German side I do not know; but it was I grant simply magnificent, from our side. We crossed two hundred yards of root-field at a steady run under fire. We leapt into the enemy's trenches bayoneted those who were still living, and then rushed on to another line of trenches in front. The whole of my battalion were in it. It was our show". Lieutenant Colonel Carter fell in action near Ypres on 4 November 1914. He was a tall, soldier-like figure, standing six feet four inches, and straight as the proverbial pine. His was a soldier's end. He went out from the trenches to direct the machine-gun fire, but fell, shot dead, as the enemy retired. He was a gallant commander, and a great leader, under whom it is an honour to have served". He had married, in 1906, Edith Mary daughter of Reverend G H Rigby and niece of Right Honourable Sir John Rigby.
DSO, QSA (5) Bel M-R OFS Trans SA 01 (Capt LNL), 1914 Star and Bar, BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Lt Col). Loyal North Lancs Regimental Museum 1981
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Loyal North Lancashire Regiment
CartwrightFrancis LennoxCaptainCARTWRIGHT, FRANCIS LENNOX, Captain, was born 27 March, 1874, fifth son of Right Honourable Sir R J Cartwright, GCMG, PC. He was educated at Bishop Ridley College; St Catherine's, Canada, and Queen's University, Kingston, Canada; became Captain 14th Battalion Princess of Wales's Own Rifles, Canadian Militia, in 1896; joined the North-West Mounted Police in 1897; served in Yukon and NW Territories. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, in Lord Strathcona's Horse, taking part in operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, 10 July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Frederickstad (17 to 25 October); operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Francis Lennox Cartwright, Captain, Lord Strathcona's Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa; returned by Lord Kitchener to be forwarded to the Governor-General, Canada; sent to Colonial Office for transmission to Canada, and presented by the Lieutenant-Governor of the North-West Territories 29 November 1901. He returned to NW Mounted Police, 1901; retired in 1904; became Captain, 5th Field Battery, Canadian Artillery, 1906; Captain, Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians), 1910; appointed Inspector NW Mounted Police, Canada. He served in the European War, 1914-16 and was given the Brevet of Major 1 July 1915. He married, in 1901, Ada Maria Carlos, eldest daughter of Augustus F Perkins, of Oak Dene, Holmwood, Surrey.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Canada contingent
CassCharles Herbert DavisCaptainCASS, CHARLES HERBERT DAVIS, Captain, was born 13 August 1858, eldest son of the Reverend Charles William Cass and Elizabeth Frances Cass. He was educated at Winchester; was gazetted to the 69th Foot 13 July 1878; became Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment, 2 February 1881, and Captain 19 January 1888. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, taking part in operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 20 November 1900, including action at Reit Vlei; operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River, May 1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November to December 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, December 1900 to April, 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order, for defending Eland's River with about 180 men against some 500 Boers with three guns [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Charles Herbert Davis Cass, Captain, Connaught Rangers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 28 March, 1903. He was promoted to Major 27 August 1902, and retired from the Worcestershire Regiment 6 July 1904. Major Cass was appointed High Sheriff for Cardiganshire in 1913. He was a Justice of the Peace for Cardiganshire. He served on the Army Recruiting Staff (voluntarily) from 1917 to 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Connaught Rangers
CavendishLord John SpencerLieutenantCAVENDISH, LORD JOHN SPENCER, Lieutenant, was born 25 March, 1875, third son of Lord Edward Cavendish and Lady Edward Cavendish, and grandson of the 7th Duke of Devonshire. He joined the 1st Life Guards, from the Militia, in February 1897; becoming Lieutenant in April, 1898. Lord John Spencer Cavendish served in the South African War of 1899-1902, as Divisional and Brigade Signalling Officer, from October 1899 to October 1900, and was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso; at the actions of Spion Kop and Vaal Kranz; operations on the Tugela Heights and action at Pieter's Hill; in the Orange Free State, and action at Zand River; in the Transvaal, and near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill; also in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, including actions at Elands River; in the Orange River Colony, including actions at Bethlehem and Wittebergen. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 1 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Lord John Spencer Cavendish, Lieutenant, 1st Life Guards. For services during operations in South Africa". He was promoted to Captain in August 1902, and from June 1937 to September 1910, was employed with the West African Frontier Force, being promoted to Major in April, 1911. He served in the European War, and was killed in action on the 20th October 1914.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Life Guards
Cavendish-BentinckLord William AugustusCaptainCAVENDISH-BENTINCK, LORD WILLIAM AUGUSTUS, Captain, was born on 31 January 1865, son of Lieutenant General Arthur Cavendish-Bentinck (great-grandson of the 3rd Duke), half-brother of the 6th Duke of Portland. He was educated at Eton, and entered the 10th Hussars, from the Militia, 16 November 1887; became Lieutenant 10 August 1889, and Captain 1 February 1893. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Lord William Augustus Cavendish-Bentinck, Captain, 10th Hussars. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He died 4 November 1903.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
10th (The Prince of Wales's Own Royal) Hussars
Champion de CrespignyClaudeCaptainCHAMPION DE CRESPIGNY, CLAUDE, Captain, was born 11 September 1873, in London, third son of Major Sir Claude Champion de Crespigny, Baronet, of Champion Lodge, Maldon, Essex, and Georgiana Margaret, second daughter of Robert McKerrall, of Hillhouse. He was educated at Hawtrey's and Eton, and was commissioned in the 2nd Life Guards 3 July 1895, becoming Lieutenant 5 August 1896, and Captain 3 February 1900. Captain de Crespigny served in the South African War, 1899-1900, and was present at the Relief of Kimberley and at operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg and actions at Poplar Grove (severely wounded); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including actions at Colesberg (1 January to 12 February). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 4 May 1900, and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; was recommended for the Victoria Cross, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Claude Champion de Crespigny, Captain, 2nd Life Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 12 March, 1902. Sir Audley Nield reported on the act of gallantry at Rensburg for which Captain de Crespigny was recommended for the Victoria Cross, and there was a leading article in the 'Army and Navy Gazette' on the subject. From December 1900, to January 1902, he was ADC to the Governor-General of India, and from 31 January 1903 to 31 August 1903 was employed with the West African Frontier Force in Southern Nigeria, taking part in the operations against the Chief Aduku-kaika of Igarra; operations against the Uris and the people of Omonoha and Ebima. He was wounded, and received the Medal and clasp. He was killed 18 May 1910.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Life Guards
ChapinSidney HerbertCaptainSidney Chapin was born in New York, USA, in 1875. In 1895, Chapin travelled to Rhodesia, where he joined the Matebele Mounted Police. During March 1896, he was attached to Coopes Scouts as part of the Matebele Relief Force. Afterwards, he joined the French Foreign Legion and was sent to Athens, taking part in the Battle of Pharsala. During 1897, he took part in Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee with the Rhodesian Forces. Chapin then returned to Rhodesia, where he joined the British South Africa Police. In September 1899, he enlisted in the South African Light Horse as a Trooper and was shortly promoted to Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant. After the Relief of Ladysmith, he received a commission as Lieutenant, and four months later, was promoted to Captain. He saw considerable action with the South African Light Horse. He received the Distinguished Service Order and stated in a letter that to the best of his knowledge, he was the first American citizen to receive it. After the Boer War, Chapin became a Sub-Inspector with the Criminal Investigation Department of the South African Government Railways. He next served as Adjutant of the British Contingent with the company that brought General Piet Cronje to the Saint Louis Exposition in 1904. Chapin then took a position with the Department of Immigration in Guatemala. He next served for five years as Assistant Commissioner of Police and Superintendent of Prisons, Gold Coast, West Africa. He was appointed Lieutenant in the 4th Royal Irish Dragoon Guards in 1914 being wounded in September 1915 and promoted Temporary Captain in February 1916. Chapin was then promoted Temporary Major and transferred to the 17th Battalion Liverpool Regiment in December, 1916. He was dismissed from the service after a Court-Martial on May 23 1918. He died in London in September 1952. Major Chapin was Mentioned In Despatches (General Buller's Despatch, June 19, 1900), “S. Chapin has done invaluable service throughout the campaign,” and again (Lord Robert's Dispatch, April 2, 1901), “For meritorious services.” He was awarded the Distinguished Service Order (London Gazette, April 19, 1901). Chapin had the Distinguished Service Order revoked (London Gazette, September 24, 1918). He is not listed in the DSO book. Some accounts suggest he was involved in the Jameson Raid but there is no evidence to support this.
[DSO], British South Africa Company's Medal rev Rhodesia 1896 (Tpr SH Chapin, MRF), QSA (5) TH RofL OFS LN Belfast (Capt. S.H. Chapin, DSO, SALH) (clasps loose on ribbon and QSA renamed), KSA (2) (Capt SH Chapin, DSO, SALH), 1914 Star and bar (officially impressed by Spink: Lt. S.H. Chapin, D.S.O.), BWM (officially impressed by Spink: Lt. S.H. Chapin, D.S.O., 4 D.Gds.), VM (officially impressed by Spink: Lt. S.H. Chapin, D.S.O., 4 D.Gds.), 1897 Jubilee Medal, 1897. eBay Sep 08 £2000.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South African Light Horse
CharlesJames Ronald EdmondstonLieutenantCHARLES, JAMES RONALD EDMONDSTON, Lieutenant, was born 26 June, 1875, son of T Edmondston Charles, MD, Honourable Physician to His Majesty the King. He entered the Royal Engineers 17 August 1894, becoming Lieutenant 17 August 1897. He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, and was present at the Relief of Kimberley, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at. Poplar Grove, Driefontein and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including actions at Colesberg (January to February). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 Sept, 1901]; "James Ronald Edmondston Charles, Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in India, and were presented by Colonel Des Voeux in India 5 April, 1902. He became Captain 1 April 1901. Captain Charles served on the North-West Frontier of India in 1908, taking part in operations in the Zakku Khel country; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 22 May 1908]; also in operations in the Mohmand country; was mentioned in Despatches 14 August 1908, and given the Brevet of Major 16 July 1908. He was GSO2, Headquarters, India, 26 November 1910 to 29 Sept, 1914; served in the European War, 1914-18; was promoted to Major 17 August 1914; was GSO1 Lahore Division, BEF, 28 May to 31 July 1915; Brigadier General, General Staff, Indian Army Corps, BEF, 1 August to 8 December 1915; Brigadier General, General Staff, 15th Army Corps, British Expeditionary Force, 17th Army Corps, British Armies in France, 9 December 1915 to 15 July 1918; Divisional Commander, 25th Division, British Armies in France, 4 August 1918 to 5 March, 1919; Brigadier General, General Staff, Stall College, 6 March 1919. He was mentioned in Despatches five times; was created a CB in 1918, and a CMG in 1919, and was made an Officer of the Legion of Honour by the French. He was given the Brevets of Lieutenant Colonel 18 February 1915, and Colonel 3 June, 1916. Major E M S Charles, CMG, DSO, was Colonel Charles's brother.
KCB (m), CMG, DSO, QSA (4) RofK Paard Drief Joh (Lt DSO RE), IGS 1908 (2) NWF 1908 Waziristan 1921-24 (…DSO RE), 1914 Star and Bar, BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Maj-Gen), 1911 Coronation, 1935 Jubilee, 1937 Coronation, Legion d'Honneur. RE Museum 1992.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
CharltonLionel Evelyn OswaldLieutenantCHARLTON, LIONEL EVELYN OSWALD, Lieutenant, was born 7 July 1879, son of William O Charlton, of Hesleyside, Northumberland. He was educated at Brighton College; passed the Staff College; joined the Lancashire Fusiliers, as Second Lieutenant, 28 September 1898; became Lieutenant, Lancashire Fusiliers, 1 September 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902. Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop (slightly wounded). Operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June). Operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900. Operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900. Employed with Imperial Yeomanry. Again slightly wounded (February 1902). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with rive clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Lionel Evelyn Oswald Charlton, Lieutenant, Lancashire Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent to South Africa, but returned, and presented by HM the King to Captain Charlton. He was promoted Captain, Lancashire Fusiliers, 5 October 1901; became Lieutenant, Imperial Yeomanry, 17 April, 1901 to 23 September 1902; became ADC to Governor and Commander-in-Chief, Leeward Islands, 29 April, 1908 to 18 April, 1909; became Captain, Royal Flying Corps, 28 April 1914; was Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, Lancashire Fusiliers, 18 August 1915 to 31 December 1916, and Major, Lancashire Fusiliers, 1 September 1915. During the European War he has been created a CMG; was GSO1, War Office, 19 March 1916 to 27 February 1917; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1917; was temporary Brigadier General 28 February 1917 to 31 March, 1918; and Director of Military Aeronautics, War Office, 28 February 1917 to 17 October 1917; Brigade-Commander, 5th Brigade, Royal Flying Corps, British Armies in France, 18 October 1917 to 31 March 1918; employed under the Air Ministry, 1 April 1918. For his services in the European War lie was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel, created a CMG, 1916, and a CB, 1919. In 1919 he was appointed Air Attache, British Embassy, Washington. He has written a book for the use of students in Hausa.
CB (Mil, n/b), CMG (b/b), DSO, QSA (5) CC OFS RofL Tr LN (Capt L E O Charlton DSO Lanc Fus), KSA (2), (Capt DSO Lanc Fus), 1914 Star and clasp (Capt DSO L Fus Attd RFC), BWM, VM & MID (Brig Gen RAF), France, Legion of Honour, Officer's breast badge, gold and enamels, Royal Humane Society, small bronze medal (Successful) (Lieut Oct 29 1899), 3rd Yorkshire Imperial Yeomanry Medal, South Africa 1901-1902 (Capt). DNW Sep 03 £15,000.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Lancashire Fusiliers
ChetwodePhilip WalhouseCaptainCHETWODE, PHILIP WALHOUSE, Captain, was born 21 September 1869, eldest son of Lieutenant Colonel Sir George Chetwode, 6th Baronet, and Alice, daughter of Michael T Bass, of Rangemore, Staffordshire. He was educated at Eton, and joined the 19th Hussars (from the Militia), as Second Lieutenant, 20 November 1889, becoming Lieutenant 6 August 1890. He served in this campaign was awarded the Medal with clasp. He served in South Africa from 1899 to 1902; during operations in Natal, 1899; including actions at Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop; taking part in the defence of Ladysmith, including sortie of 7 December 1899, and action of 6 January 1900; during operations in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek; during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast and Lydenberg, and operations in the Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; during operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900, to May 1901; in Orange River Colony, July 1901; in Cape Colony, August 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned twice in Despatches (February and 10 September 1901); awarded the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. In September 1901, he was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Philip Walhouse Chetwode, Captain, 19th Hussars. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902, and the Warrant sent 4 November 1902, and acknowledged by his mother 6 November 1902. He was promoted Major 21 December 1901, and succeeded his father to the Baronetcy in 1905. From 1906 to 1907 Major Chetwode was employed as AMS to the GO Commanding-in-Chief (1st Class), Aldershot Army Corps, and from December 1907 to May 1908, he acted in the same capacity to the GO Commanding-in-Chief, Aldershot Command. He became Lieutenant Colonel 3 January 1908, and Colonel 4 October 1911. In April 1912, he was appointed Brigadier Commander of the London Mounted Brigade, London District, and in May 1914, commanded the 5th Cavalry Brigade, Northern Command. He served during the European War, 1914-18, as Brigade Commander, 5th Cavalry Brigade, BEF, 5 August 1914 to 14 July 1915; was Divisional Commander, 2nd Cavalry Division, BEF, British Armies in France, 15 July 1915 to 15 November 1916. He commanded the Desert Column, No 3 Section, Canal Defences, Egyptian Expeditionary Force, 3 December 1916 to 21 April, 1917; Commander, Eastern Force, Egypt, 22 April 1917 to 1 August 1917. He was created a KCMG in 1917. General Sir Archibald Murray, GCMG, KCB, late General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Egyptian Expeditionary Force, said in his Despatch, dated 28 June, 1917: "The General Officer Commanding Eastern Force, Lieutenant General Sir P W Chetwode, Baronet, KCMG, CB, DSO, has united the qualities of brilliant leadership and sure judgment, and has invariably inspired confidence in all ranks". Sir Philip Chetwode commanded the 20th Army Corps, Egyptian Expeditionary Force, 2 August 1917 to 8 June, 1919, taking part in the operations in Palestine and Syria. General Sir Edmund Allenby, GCMG, KCB, Commanding-in-Chief, Egyptian Expeditionary Force, says in his Despatch, dated 16 December 1917 [London Gazette, 25 January 1918]: "Major General (Temporary Lieutenant General) Sir Philip Chetwode, Baronet, KCMG, CB, DSO. My plan of operations was based on his appreciation of the situation, and on the scheme which he put forward to me on my arrival in Egypt last summer. To his strategical foresight and tactical skill the success of the campaign is largely due". General Sir Edmund Allenby said in his Despatch, dated 31 October 1918 [London Gazette, 30 December 1918]: "I ordered Lieutenant General Sir Philip Chetwode, Baronet, KCB, KCMG, DSO, commanding the 20th Corps, to advance his line, east of the Bireh-Nablus road, on the night preceding the main attack, so as to place the 53rd Division on his right flank, which was somewhat drawn back, in a more favourable position to block the exits to the lower valley of the Jordan. I ordered him to be prepared to carry out a further advance, with both the 53rd and 10th Divisions, on the evening of the day on which the attack in the coastal plain took place, or later, as circumstances demanded". Sir Philip Chetwode was created a KCB [London Gazette, 1 January 1918]: "For valuable services in connection with the military operations culminating in the capture of Jerusalem". He was made a Commandeur, Legion of Honour; he received the Croix de Guerre; was Grand Officier, Order of the Nile, and was promoted to Lieutenant General 1 January 1919. He became Military Secretary to the Secretary of State for War, and Secretary, Selection Board, 9 June, 1919. Sir Philip Chetwode married, in 1899, Hester Alice Camilla, eldest daughter of Colonel the Honourable Richard Stapleton-Cotton, and they had one son, Roger Charles George, born 18 April, 1906, and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
19th (Queen Alexandra's Own Royal) Hussars
ChiazzariNicholas WilliamLieutenantCHIAZZARI, NICHOLAS WILLIAM, Lieutenant, Natal Naval Volunteers, was born in 1868, son of Joseph Chiazzari. He served in South Africa. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 6 November 1900]: "Nicholas William Chiazzari, Lieutenant, Natal Naval Volunteers. In recognition of services during the war in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the Governor of Natal, 31 January 1901, at a Parade of the Natal Naval Volunteers at Durban (Admiralty, 11 March, 1901). He was promoted Commander. Commander Chiazzari married, in 1890, Elizabeth Kavanagh.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Natal Naval Volunteers
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