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TOPIC: Died at sea

Died at sea 1 year 3 months ago #59191

  • Elmarie
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OFFICERS DIED AT SEA:

Lieutenant Thomas Butler Ely, 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers, died of enteric on board the S.S. "Orcana," at sea on 15th April 1900. He was the only son of Major-Gen. Ely and was born in September 1875, educated at Brighton, entered the Royal Dublin Fusiliers in December 1897 and was promoted Lieutenant in October 1899. He was present at the battle of Talana Hill, where he took command of his company, as his Captain was killed. He then took part in the retirement on Ladysmith and went south with his battalion before the investment of that town was complete. He was then present at all the battles and actions on the Tugela, in which his battalion took part, and entered Ladysmith with the relieving force. He afterwards contracted enteric, was invalided, and died as stated.

Quartermaster and Hon. Lieutenant William Walters Girling, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, died at sea on board the transport "Dilwara," on 22nd May 1902. He was born in May 1857, served in the ranks nearly eighteen years and became quartermaster in the Coldstream Guards in May 1895. He took part in the Soudan Campaign 1885, receiving the medal with clasp and Khedive's star. He had seen much active service in South Africa before he was invalided home and took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Belmont, Graspan, Modder River, and Magersfontein. He was also present with his battalion in the operations in the O.R.C., from February to May 1900, including the actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein.

Lieutenant Richard John Jelf, Royal Engineers, died 2nd June 1900, on board the troopship " Dilwara " whilst on his way home invalided from Natal. He was the eldest son of Major-Gen. R. H. Jelf, C.M.G., Governor and Commandant of the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and was born in 1872. Educated at Cheam and Eton (Mr. Luxmoore's), he obtained his commission in the Royal Engineers in February 1892. Lieutenant Jelf was a good horseman, and when stationed at Gibraltar was well known with the Calpe Hounds. He was selected for service in the Telegraph Battalion when on leave from Gibraltar, and sailed for South Africa 21st October 1899. After serving at De Aar and up to the Modder River, he was transferred with his section of the Telegraph Battalion to Gen. Sir Redvers Buller's command in Natal, and virtually acted as Director of Telegraphs to that officer throughout all his operations up to the Relief of Ladysmith. Having no proper staff to assist him, Lieutenant Jelf had frequently to act as a telegraph operator at the instrument. His health subsequently broke down, and he was invalided home. He was mentioned in despatches, L.G., 8th February 1901, as indefatigable, and having had to work constantly day and night : " no difficulty was too great for him." Gen. Sir Redvers Buller in his despatch 9th November 1900, wrote, "I cannot omit a reference to the late Lieutenant R.J. Jelf, Royal Engineers. A young officer of singular talent and promise, he lost his life from devotion to his duties.'' In September 1899, shortly before he left for South Africa, Lieutenant Jelf married Violet, daughter of Gen. Sir Richard Harrison, Inspector-General of Fortifications.

Major Fitzalan George John Manners, Scots Guards, sailed for South Africa 2nd March 1901 for special service in the M.I., and died at sea on board the S.S.Tagus, off St. Helena, of enteric on 15th March. He was the youngest son of the late Lord George Manners, Royal Horse Guards, and M.P. for Cambridgeshire, who was the third son of the 5th Duke of Rutland. His mother was Mary Adeliza Matilda, daughter of the 13th Duke of Norfolk. Major Manners was born in February 1866 and educated at Hoddesden, Herts, and at Wellington. He entered the Scots Guards in August 1885, from the Royal Military College, and was promoted Captain in May 1897 and major the 1st March 1901, a few days before his death. He was fond of literature and was editor of the Badminton Diary, and author of several books on drill. Major Manners was considered an expert on heraldry.

Lieutenant Charles Edward Martin, 1st Battalion Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadians), died of pneumonia at sea on board the "Dilwara" whilst en route to South Africa on 1st May 1900. Born in January 1876, he entered the Leinster Regiment from the 3rd Battalion Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment in March 1897, being promoted Lieutenant in July 1899.

Major Lucius Augustus de Vere Maunsell, 9th Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps, and late of the Leicestershire Regiment, died on 24th January 1900, on board the S.S. Nile, while going to South Africa with his battalion. Born in August 1863, he entered the Leicestershire Regiment from the Militia in May 1885, and was promoted Captain in 1894. He retired 24th July 1895 and on the same day was promoted to a majority in the 9th Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps. His battalion was embodied in December 1899 and volunteering for active service, Major Maunsell embarked with it in January 1900.

Lieutenant W.J. Poole, Imperial Yeomanry, died of dysentery on board the S.S. "Canada," 28th July 1901, while on passage home from South Africa. He was a 2nd Lieutenant in the 2nd Tower Hamlets Volunteer Rifle Corps. He entered the Imperial Yeomanry as a Lieutenant in April 1901 and served with the 22nd Battalion.

Major Reginald Whitworth Porter, D.S.O., 2nd in command of the 1st Battalion Oxfordshire Light Infantry, died 10th May 1902, of a disease of the heart, on board the transport "Orotava," in which he had been invalided home from South Africa. He was the eldest surviving son of Henry Aylmer Porter, Esq., of Cranbourne Court, Windsor Forest, was born in May 1856 and educated at Cheltenham. He entered the Oxfordshire Light Infantry in September 1876, being promoted Captain in January 1886 and major in November 1894. He served in the campaign on the North West Frontier of India under the late Sir William Lockhart, 1897 98, with the 2nd Battalion of his regiment in the Mohmand Field Force, and with the Peshawur column and the 5th brigade of the Tirah Expeditionary Force, including the operations in the Bara Valley, receiving the medal with two clasps. During the South African war he took part in the march from Modder River to Bloemfontein and was present in the engagements at Klip Drift, Paardeberg, Poplar Grove, Driefontein and the occupation of Bloemfontein. He afterwards served in the O.R.C., and performed the duties of commandant of Rietspruit and Assistant Provost Marshal at Heilbron. He was appointed 2nd in command of his battalion from September 1900 and served subsequently as Railway Staff Officer and was mentioned in despatches, L.G., 10th September 1901, being awarded the D.S.O. and the South African medal with four clasps and the King's medal with two clasps. Major Porter's name is inscribed on the Eleanor Cross Memorial erected at Cheltenham College to the memory 7 of Cheltonians who fell in the war.

Captain Houston Michael Shaw-Stewart, D.S.O., 17th Lancers, was accidentally drowned on 28th July 1901, while on voyage home from South Africa in S.S. "Canada." He was the son of Sir Michael Robert Shaw- Stewart of Ardgowan, Greenock, by his marriage with Lady Octavia Grosvenor, and therefore a grandson of Richard, second Marquis of Westminster. He was born in October 1871, and educated at Eton (Mr. Austen Leigh's), where he was second for the Jelf Prize in 1877. He then went to Christ Church, Oxford. Captain Shaw-Stewart entered the 17th Lancers from the 4th Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in December 1894, being promoted Lieutenant in November 1895 and Captain in January 1900. He went out to South Africa with his regiment in February 1900 and saw much service during the war. He was mentioned in despatches, L.G., 10th September 1901 and was awarded the D.S.O. His brother officers have placed a tablet to his memory in St. John's Episcopal Church, Greenock, as a token of their regard and affection.
Captain Francis Hubert Clifford Sutton, Royal Canadian Dragoons, died at sea 6th January 1901 onboard Roslin Castle whilst returning from South Africa to Halifax, N.S. He was the only surviving son of the late Rev. Walter Henry Sutton, of South Cerney, Gloucestershire, and was thirty-five years of age.

Surgeon-Captain John Tressilian Toll, 1st South Australian Mounted Rifles Contingent, died of enteric at sea on 20 June 1900 onboard SS Australasia. He had served during the South African War but had been invalided. He was a fellow of the Royal Colonial Institute, and his name is inscribed on a memorial tablet in the hall of the building in Northumberland Avenue, S.W.

2nd Lieutenant Aylmer Willoughby Wallace, 2nd Battalion King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, was invalided home suffering from a broken leg, the effects of an accident in South Africa. He, however, developed symptoms of enteric the day after he joined the S.S. "Dunera," and died 9th October 1901 from this disease. He was the son of Col. N. W. Wallace, J. P., late of the King's Royal Rifle Corps, and now commanding the 4th County of London (King's Colonials) I.Y. 2nd Lieutenant Wallace was born in February 1880 and educated at Rugby. He first served in the Cape Mounted Rifles from the commencement of the war and on the recommendation of the Field-Marshal commanding-in-chief, South Africa, he was granted a commission in the Yorkshire Light Infantry in May 1900. He was then appointed to the M.I. of his battalion, and when invalided had taken part in some 30 engagements, among them the defence of Wepener during its siege by the Boers.

Lieutenant T.D.L. Whittington, 2nd Royal Lancaster Regiment, died of disease at sea on SS Sumatra on 12th March 1900.

Major Alfred Edward Wrottesley, Royal Engineers, was drowned on passage to South Africa 26th October 1899. He was born in December 1855 and entered the Royal Engineers in August 1874, being promoted Captain in August 1885 and major in May 1894. He had been an associate member of the Royal Engineer committee from June 1898. A memorial window, dedicated to him, is in St. Nicholas's Church, Codsall, Staffordshire.
Elmarie Malherbe
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Died at sea 1 year 3 months ago #59194

  • davidh
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Hello Berenice

Pressland is one of 'my' men. I have his QSA with clasps Talana & Defence of Ladysmith. His name on the QSA is Presland.

David

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Died at sea 1 year 3 months ago #59195

  • BereniceUK
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davidh wrote: Pressland is one of 'my' men. I have his QSA with clasps Talana & Defence of Ladysmith. His name on the QSA is Presland.

David


The following deaths occurred at sea on the hospital ship Lismore Castle :
2nd Royal Lancaster Regt. - 5375 Lance-Corp. T. Swan (enteric), April 29.
1st Norfolk Regt. - 4233 Pt. H. Green (hepatitis). April 23.
53rd Battery Royal Field Artillery. - 12602 Dvr. H. Robertson (dysentery), April 26.
1st Leicester Regt. - 3935 Pt. G. Sharpe (dysentery), May 3.
1st South Lancashire Regt. - 2451 Pt. J. Macdonald (tubercle lung), May 15.
2nd Dorset Regt. - 3852 Pt. J. Miles (dysentery), April 26.
5th Dragoon Guards. - 4341 Lance-Corp. H. Doggett (dysentery), April 25 ; 4452 Lance-Corp. G. Taylor (dysentery), May 7.
1st King's Royal Rifle Corps. - 7481 Lance-Corp. W. Pressland (enteric), April 27.
Imperial Light Horse. - 264 Tpr. B. Bains (dysentery).
The Morning Post, Wednesday 23rd May 1900

As Presland received a QSA with clasps it presumably follows that all the above men died on the voyage back to England. Thanks for that, David.
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Died at sea 1 year 3 months ago #59200

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"Imperial Light Horse. - 264 Tpr. B. Bains (dysentery), April 27." is interesting.

The official casualty roll shows his place of death as Albert Docks (London). He is not in Deaths at Sea as all the others are. Other sources I have consulted such as The Times and Army & Navy Gazette only show him dying aboard SS Lismore Castle which docked on May 20th.

May 20th is Bain's date of death not April 27 - from the casualty roll and medal roll. His first name is "Wallace".

If he died in the UK he must be buried here, I wonder where?
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Died at sea 1 year 3 months ago #59207

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SWB wrote: "Imperial Light Horse. - 264 Tpr. B. Bains (dysentery), April 27." is interesting.

The official casualty roll shows his place of death as Albert Docks (London). He is not in Deaths at Sea as all the others are. Other sources I have consulted such as The Times and Army & Navy Gazette only show him dying aboard SS Lismore Castle which docked on May 20th.

May 20th is Bain's date of death not April 27 - from the casualty roll and medal roll. His first name is "Wallace".

If he died in the UK he must be buried here, I wonder where?


You're correct, he didn't die April 27, my error. Sergeant Perks, Welsh Regt., died off the Isle of Wight as the tramp he was on was heading for Southampton, yet was still buried at sea. Would a hospital ship have carried coffins for deaths close to shore, or was the policy to always bury at sea, especially with cases of enteric?

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Died at sea 1 year 3 months ago #59208

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BereniceUK wrote: You're correct, he didn't die April 27, my error. Sergeant Perks, Welsh Regt., died off the Isle of Wight as the tramp he was on was heading for Southampton, yet was still buried at sea. Would a hospital ship have carried coffins for deaths close to shore, or was the policy to always bury at sea, especially with cases of enteric?


Interesting question on coffins, I suspect not. As Bain is not in the Deaths At Sea Register (BT344) he definitely did not die at sea - or far enough from the land to be buried at sea. The distance from land must be small as in your example of Sgt Perks, or the water was sufficiently deep. A quick google failed to bring up this information for the UK; Australia goes by sea depth, USA by distance from shore. 
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