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(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
RennieJohn GeorgeCaptainRENNIE, JOHN GEORGE, Captain, was born 25 February 1865. He was educated at Cheltenham, and entered the Black Watch 30 January 1886, as Lieutenant, becoming Captain 22 March 1893. Captain Rennie was Adjutant, Royal Highlanders, 29 May 1893 to 28 May 1897. He served as ADC to the Brigadier General commanding the 1st Brigade, British Division, Sudan Expeditionary Force, 13 July 1898 to 29 September 1898, and was present at the Battle of Khartoum. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898]: awarded the 4th Class Medjidie, the Medal, the Egyptian Medal and clasp. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as ADC to Major-General, Infantry Brigade, South Africa, 9 October to 11 December 1899, and took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the action at Magersfontein; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg; actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein and Vet River; operations in Orange River Colony, including actions at Rhenoster River, Wittebergen and Witpoort; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899; operations in the Transvaal in November 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, November 1900 to September 1901, and December 1901 to May 1902; operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in October 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "John George Rennie, Captain, Black Watch. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented by General Lyttelton at Newcastle, Natal, 4 November 1901. Major Rennie, who retired 3 June 1905, was Adjutant, 5th (VB) Highland Light Infantry, from 1902. He was married, and had one son and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)
ReynoldsPhilip GuyMajorREYNOLDS, PHILIP GUY, Major, was born 19 January 1871, at Raddon Court, Cheshire, third son of Sylvanus Reynolds, of Raddon Court, Cheshire. He was educated at Malvern College, Worcestershire; gazetted to 17th Lancers 28 June 1893; transferred to 5th Dragoon Guards 12 November 1893. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, employed with SA Constabulary 9 December 1900 to 19 February 1907; operations in Natal, 1899, including action at Elandslaagte; Defence of Ladysrnith, including sortie of 7 December 1899, and 6 January 1900; operations in Natal, including action at Laing's Nek; operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902 (slightly wounded). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901, and 29 July 1902]; was given the Brevet of Major 22 August 1902; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Philip Guy Reynolds, Major, 3rd Dragoon Guards. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief, South Africa, and were presented by HRH the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 August 1901. He had been promoted to Captain, 3rd Dragoon Guards, 27 June 1900; was Adjutant, Imperial Yeomanry, 20 February 1903 to 19 February 1907; became Major 2 July 1908, and retired 2 March 1912. He married, 15 July 1905, in Cheshire, Daisy, second daughter of Charlie Holly (American); they had one daughter, Leila Joan, born 4 October 1900.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
3rd (The Prince of Wales's) Dragoon Guards
RicardoAmbrose St QuintinCaptainRICARDO, AMBROSE ST QUINTIN, Captain, was born at Gatcombe, Minchinhampton, Gloucestershire, 21 November 1866, fourth son of Henry David Ricardo, of Gatcombe, Minchinhampton, and Ellen Crawley, daughter of Archdeacon Crawley, of Llandaff. He was educated at Winchester; Cooper's Hill, and Cambridge. He joined the Army 10 November 1888; became Lieutenant 15 December 1890, and Captain 6 August 1897. Captain Ricardo served in the Tirah Campaign on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98, with the Peshawar Column, 5th Brigade (Medal with two clasps). Captain Ricardo served in South Africa, 1899 to 1902, and was present at operations in Natal, March to June 1900; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September). He served as Adjutant, 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, from 1 to 31 December 1901, and from 4 February 1901 to 31 May 1902, and as Station Staff Officer. Operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to December 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, December 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902 (by Sir R H Buller, Lord Kitchener, etc)]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and for the part he played in taking Bergendal Farm was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 190] ]: "Ambrose St Quintin Ricardo, Captain, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC, Cape Colony, and were presented in Cape Town 17 January 1903. He retired 17 January 1903. Captain Ricardo served in the European War; was given the Brevet of Major 3 June 1917; the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1918; was Temporary Brigadier General; was created a CMG in 1917, and a CBE in 1919. He married, 13 July 1893, at Thayet Myo, Burma, Elizabeth Alice, second daughter of Emerson Tennent Hordman, of Sion House, County Tyrone.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers
RichardsBernard OgilvieCaptainRICHARDS, BERNARD OGILVIE, Captain, was born 20 July 1874. He was gazetted to the Worcestershire Regiment 20 February 1895; became Lieutenant 11 August 1895, and Captain 20 June 1900. Captain Richards served in the South African War, 1899-1902, employed with Mounted Infantry. He was present at the Relief of Kimberley, and took part in operations in the Orange Free State. February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to November 1900, including action at Eland's River (16 August); operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (8 to 16 July); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including actions at Colesberg (14 January to 5 February); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to January 1902, and March to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Bernard Ogilvie Richards, Captain, Worcestershire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 18 December 1903. Captain Richards was Adjutant, Militia, 20 December 1902 to 19 December 1907. He retired from the Worcestershire Regiment, 2 April 1010; became Captain, 3rd Battalion East Surrey Regt; became Major, Reserve of Officers, 14 September 1016. He served during the European War as Temporary Lieutenant Colonel 9th Essex Regiment.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Worcestershire Regiment
RichardsSidneyCaptainRICHARDS, SIDNEY, Captain, was educated at Cheltenham College. He served throughout the Siege of Kimberley, in the Kimberley Town Guard, during the South African War, 1899-1900, and for his services was mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Sidney Richards, Captain, Kimberley Town Guard. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent to South Africa, and presented there. He was also promoted to Major. He joined the Victoria Rifles, late Duke of Edinburgh's Own Volunteer Rifles.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Kimberley TG
RichardsonFrancis JamesCaptainRICHARDSON, FRANCIS JAMES, Captain, was born 8 March 1866, son of Francis Richardson, of Juniper Hall, Dorking. He was educated at Cheam; Charterhouse, and Jesus College, Cambridge. He was gazetted to the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders 9 May 1888; became Lieutenant 26 February 1890, and Captain 1 July 1897. Captain Richardson served in the South African War, 1899-1901, as Adjutant, 4th Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (1 May to 5 August 1901). He took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Modder River and Magersfontein; operations in Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Dreifontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Zilikat's Nek; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to May 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, May to July 1901; operations in Cape Colony, July 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September. 1901]: "Francis James Richardson, Captain, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He retired 16 June 1906, and became Major, Special Reserve Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and in 1912, DAD Remounts, Eastern Command. He married, 19 July 1899, in Ireland, Rhoda Dagmar Richardson, daughter of Restell R Bevis, and their children were Francis Desmond, born in 1902, and Elspeth Rhoda. Major Richardson died 11 December 1917, of wounds received in action.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Princess Louise's) Sutherland and Argyll Highland
RichardsonJohnCaptainRICHARDSON, JOHN, Captain, was born at 14, Park Terrace, Glasgow, 3 April 1859, son of John Richardson, of 17 Wilton Crescent, London. He was educated at Eton; joined the Army 13 August 1879; served in Crete, 1898; was promoted Captain 22 November 1890. He served in South Africa, 1899-1902; was promoted Major, Highland Light Infantry, 4 December 1900; took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the action at Magersfontein, where he was slightly wounded. He took part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1901; at further operations after the Free State had been annexed to Great Britain under the name of the Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July) and Witpoort; and in the operations of 30 November 1900 to February 1901. He also took part in the operations in Cape Colony, February 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned twice in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 March 1900, and 10 September 1901]; was awarded the Queen's Medal and two clasps; King's Medal and two clasps, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "John Richardson, Captain, Highland Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902; the Warrant sent 4 November 1902. He retired from the Army in September 1904, on retired pay. He served as a Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, in command of the Depot, Highland Light Infantry, from 13 November 1914 to 30 August 1916; promoted Honorary Lieutenant Colonel [London Gazette, 11 April 1917]. He was unmarried.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Highland Light Infantry
Richardson-GriffithsCharles du PlatMajorRICHARDSON-GRIFFITHS, CHARLES DU PLAT, Major, was born 2 June 1855. He joined the 13th Foot 20 November 1875; became Lieutenant, Bedfordshire Regiment, 5 January 1876; served in the Afghan War, 1879-80 (Medal); was Adjutant 5 October 1883 to 31 December 1887; was promoted Captain 4 October 1885; was Adjutant, Militia, 14 July 1888 to 19 August 1893; became Major, Gloucestershire Regiment, 19 February 1896. Major Richardson-Griffiths served in the South African War, 1900-2. In command 2nd Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment from May to October 1900. He was present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900; operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River; operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Charles du Plat Richardson-Griffiths, Major, Gloucestershire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia and Warrant were sent to Lord Kitchener, and presented to Major Richardson-Griffiths by Major General G Barton in South Africa. Major Richardson-Griffiths retired 2 June 1903. He married, in 1894, Florence, daughter of H Schwabe.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Gloucestershire Regiment
RicheyGeorge Henry MillsCaptainRICHEY, GEORGE HENRY MILLS, Captain, was born at Woolwich 18 May 1867, son of Captain William Mills Richey, RA, City Marshal of London, and Eliza Louise, daughter of Alexander Luke, of Carsluke, Scotland. He served as a volunteer in Methuen's Horse, in the Bechuanaland Expedition, 1884-85; was in the 12th Royal Lancers in 1886, and the 2nd Dragoon Guards. He entered the Colonial Service in 1895, and went through the Matabele War of 1896, and the Mashona Campaign of 1897-98, and received the General Service South African Medal and clasp. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, part of the time as Adjutant of Kitchener's Horse. During part of the South African War he was Chief of Police, Krugersdorp District, in 1900, and later on Staff Officer to Dean's Column, operating in the Cape Colony towards the end of the war. He served under Ian Hamilton in his march to Johannesburg and Pretoria. The Army List says that he took part in "the Relief of Kimberley. Operations in the Orange Free State, February, including operations at Paardeberg, and action at Driefontein. Operations in the Transvaal, including action near Johannesburg". He was wounded at Waterval Drift in 1900, and at Houtnek in 1900. He was mentioned three times in Despatches; recommended for the Victoria Cross, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "George Henry Mills Richey, Captain, Kitchener's Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The decoration was awarded "For gallantry in the field, and devotion to duty and good work". The following is an extract from a letter written by Lieutenant Colonel Norton Legge, 20th Hussars, Commanding Kitchener's Horse, dated Pretoria, 10 August 1900: "Captain George Richey served in the regiment under my command— first as a subaltern and afterwards as my Adjutant, for which position I selected him on the promotion of Major Congreve, VC, and I have had many opportunities of noticing his exceptional ability. He was promoted Captain by request of General Broadwood, CB, Commanding 2nd Cavalry Brigade, for a clever reconnaissance of the Boer position at Poplar Grove. He got by himself to within 800 yards of their main position, and succeeded in sketching it and locating their guns. For this service (which had important results) Lord Roberts personally complimented him. As my Adjutant he was ever ready for work, and he carried out his arduous duties to my entire satisfaction". Major George Cookson, 16th Lancers, Commanding Kitchener's Horse, wrote: "Captain G H M Richey was Adjutant of Kitchener's Horse, and was all through the fighting under General Ian Hamilton, with his Winburg Column; on three different occasions his name was sent in for gallant conduct in the field; on one occasion, when with an officer's patrol, he gave up his horse to a trooper who had had a fall and lost his own horse, and walked back under fire on foot". From Major General H J M MacAndrew, CB, DSO: "Captain G H M Richey served under me as a troop leader in D Squadron, Kitchener's Horse, for about, one month, and until he was promoted to the appointment of Adjutant of the regiment. During the time Captain Richey served under me I had the pleasure of bringing his gallant conduct, in action to the notice of the Commanding Officer on three separate occasions, and I believe his services have been brought to the notice of His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief". He was subsequently promoted to Major. During the early part of the European War he was Second-in-Command of the 23rd Royal Fusiliers (1st Sportsman's), under Viscount Maitland. Lieutenant Colonel G H M Richey later commanded the 4th East Lancashire Regiment, British Expeditionary Force. He won many prizes in India for skill at arms. At Rawal Pindi in 1892 he won five first prizes, and two second at the Punjab Assault-at-Arms. He won the tent-pegging after 14 runs, four of which were at the peg sideways. All the pegs were 'taken'.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Kitchener's Horse
RickmanWilliam EdwardCaptainRICKMAN, WILLIAM EDWARD, Captain, was born in 1855, He served in the South African War, 1900-02; was mentioned in Despatches, awarded the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "William Edward Rickman, Captain, Kimberley Light Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. Captain Rickman married, in 1895, Margaret Menzies Haliburton.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Kimberley Light Horse
RiggallArthur HortonCaptainRIGGALL, ARTHUR HORTON, Captain, was born 8 May 1867, son of Thomas Riggall. He served in the South African War, as Captain, Tasmanian Imperial Bushmen, 1901-2, and was present at operations in Rhodesia, the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony. He received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Arthur Horton Riggall, Captain, Tasmanian Imperial Bushmen. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented there. He was awarded the Volunteer Decoration.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Tasmania contingent
RileyRupert FarquharLieutenantRILEY, RUPERT FARQUHAR, Lieutenant, was born 11 October 1873. He entered the Army 9 December 1896, as Second Lieutenant, Yorkshire Light Infantry. He was present during the operations on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897 to 1898, with the Tirah Expeditionary Force (Medal with clasp). He served during the South African War, 1899-1902; was employed with the Mounted Infantry, taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; taking part during operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Driefontein and Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River and Zand River; was present during operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; during operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, including actions at Zilikat's Nek and Elands River (4 to 16 August). He was present during operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received both SA Medals with seven clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Rupert Farquhar Riley, Lieutenant, Yorkshire Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 18 December 1902. He was promoted Captain 15 April 1901, and was Brigade Major, Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Infantry Brigade, Northern Command, 1 December 1910 to 4 July 1911; Brigade Major, Essex Infantry Brigade, Eastern Command, 5 July 1911 to 2 January 1912, and Staff Captain, War Office, 3 January 1912 to 17 March 1915. He served during the European War; was promoted Major 1 October 1914, and received the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 3 June 1916, and was Deputy Assistant, War Office (Temp), 18 March to 20 July 1915; Assistant Director, War Office (Temp), 21 July 1915 to 15 April 1917; was AAGM, War Office, 16 April 1917 to 11 March 1918; AA and QMG, Supreme War Council, Versailles, 12 March to 4 May 1918, and Assistant Military Secretary, War Office (Temp), 1 June 1918. He was created a CMG in 1917. Lieutenant Colonel Riley married, in 1903, Violet Louise, youngest daughter of Ernest St G Cobbold.
CMG, DSO, IGS 1895 (2) P-F 1897-98 Tirah (Lt, 2/KOYLI), QSA (5) Bel M-R Drief Joh D-H (Capt, 2/YLI), KSA (2) (Capt, DSO), BWM, Victory Medal MID, 1911 Coronation. Sothebys 1982 £1,050. KOYLI Regimental Museum, 1992.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Yorkshire Light Infantry
RobertsonJamesReverendROBERTSON, JAMES, The Reverend, was born 19 August 1855, son of Robert Robertson, of Grantown-on-Spey. He was educated at Aberdeen and Edinburgh Universities, and joined the Army 18 April, 1884, as Chaplain to the Forces, 4th Class. He served during the operations of the Sudan Frontier Field Force in 1885, being present at the action of Kosheh during its investment, at the reconnaissance on the 16th December, and at the engagement of Giniss. He was mentioned in Despatches and received the Medal and the Khedive's Bronze Star. Mr Robertson married, in 1887, Nellie (who died in 1911), daughter of Hugh Allan, JP, of Glassaugh, County Banff. He became Chaplain to the Forces, 3rd Class, 21 December 1896. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as Chaplain to the Highland Brigade, and took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Modder River and Magersfontein. Operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 29 February); actions at Koodoosburg, Poplar Grove and Driefontein; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including occupation of Bloemfontein, actions at Waterval, Vet River, Blaauberg, Roodepoort, and in the Wittebergen (1 to 29 July) and Witpoort. He was Senior Presbyterian Chaplain to the South African Field Force from October 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; King's Medal with two clasps; was promoted Chaplain to the Forces, 2nd Class, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "The Reverend James Robertson, Chaplain to the Forces, 3rd Class (now promoted Chaplain to the Forces, 2nd Class). In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 August 1901. He retired from the Army 3 September 1904, and became Minister of the Parish of Methveii, Perthshire. Mr Robertson was given the honorary degree of DD of Aberdeen University.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Chaplain to the Forces
RobinsonFrederick William TempletownCaptainROBINSON, FREDERICK WILLIAM TEMPLETOWN, Captain, was born 21 April 1863, eldest son of Sir William C F Robinson, GCMG, and nephew of the Right Honourable Sir Hercules Robinson, Baronet, afterwards Lord Rosmead. He was educated at the Reverend T Hawtrey's, Windsor, and at Foster's, Stubbington, Hants. He joined the Yorkshire Regiment, as Lieutenant, from the Militia, 12 November 1884; was ADC to the Governor of Western Australia 26 July 1893 to 11 July 1894; was appointed Commandant of the Fremantle Riile Volunteers, Western Australia, 1893, receiving the thanks of the Australian Government for successful service; became Captain, Royal Sussex Regiment, 8 April 1896. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; was Commandant at Bethulie and performed the duties of Commandant at Hoopstad. He took part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including the action at Zand River; operations in Orange River Colony, 30 November 1900 to February 1901, and March 1901 to 31 May 1902; operations in Cape Colony, February to March 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Frederick William Templetown Robinson, Captain, Royal Sussex Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902; the Warrant, etc, sent 4 November 1902. He was promoted Major, Royal Garrison Regiment, 17 December 1902, and retired 7 December 1905. He became Brigade Major, Liverpool Infantry Volunteer Brigade, in 1906. He served as Major, Second-in-Command of the 2/16th (County of London) Regiment, Queen's Westminsters, 1914—15-16; Major Robinson was appointed Recruiting Officer under the Ministry of National Service at Halifax, Yorkshire, 9 May 1918. He married, in 1888, Gertrude Maria, daughter of Sir Alfred Hughes, 9th Baronet, of East Bergholt Lodge, Suffolk.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Sussex Regiment
RodgerThomas HendersonMajorRODGER, THOMAS HENDERSON, Major, was born at Wynberg, near Cape Town, 10 March 1860. He served in the DEOVR in the Gaika-Galeka War of 1877-78, and in the Diamond Field Horse in the Langberg Rebellion, Bechuanaland, 1896-97 (Medal and clasp). He was promoted Captain, 1894; Major, 1899, and again saw active service in the South African War, 1899-1902, taking part in the defence of Kimberley. Operations in Orange Free State, February to May 1900. Relief of Mafeking. Operations in the Transvaal, May and June 1900. Operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900. Operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River. Operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 May 1900, and 16 April 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Thomas Henderson Rodger, Major, Diamond Fields Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented there. In 1902 he became Officer Commanding the Kimberley Horse, with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Lieutenant Colonel Rodger married, in 1885, Elizabeth Johanna, daughter of W J Merrington, of Claremont, Cape Colony.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Diamond Fields Horse
RogersJohn MiddletonMajorROGERS, JOHN MIDDLETON, Major, was born 24 August 1864, eldest son of Captain John Thornton Rogers, of Riverhill. He was gazetted to the 1st Dragoons, as Lieutenant, 7 February 1885; became Captain 25 November 1891; was on Special Extra-Regimental Employment 7 December 1898. He served in the South African War, 1899-1901; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 1900, and action at Pieter's Hill. Operations in Natal, March to June 1900. Operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900. He was in command of the 1st Dragoons from 15 July to 12 December 1901. Operations in the Transvaal, April to August 1901. Operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to April 1901, and August to December 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches (by Sir R H Buller, 30 March and 9 November 1900) [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]: received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "John Middleton Rogers, Major, 1st Dragoons. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented by Major General C Knox at Bethulie, 6 December 1901. He had been promoted to Major 23 April 1900. Lieutenant Colonel Rogers retired. He was Lieutenant Colonel, 2nd County of London Yeomanry, and JP for Kent. He married, in 1899, Muriel Blanche Gwendoline, daughter of Sir Charles Morrison-Bell, 1st Baronet, of Otterburn Hall, Otterburn, and they had three sons and two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
1st (Royal) Dragoons
RollestonLancelotLieutenant ColonelROLLESTON, LANCELOT, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 19 August 1847, at Watnell Hall, Notts, son of Lancelot Rolleston, DL, Colonel, Notts Militia, MP for South Nottinghamshire, and Eleanor Charlotte, daughter of Robert Fraser, of Torbreck. He was educated at Wellington College and Christ Church, Oxford, and joined the South Notts Hussars Yeomanry in September 1868. In 1877 he was High Sheriff of Nottinghamshire. He became Lieutenant Colonel in the South Notts Hussars 25 November 1896, and commanded a squadron of his regiment in the South African War, from 1900 to 1901. He took part in several operations in Cape Colony, Orange River Colony and the Transvaal, and was severely wounded at Lindley on 1 June 1900, in the attempt to rescue 500 prisoners taken by Piet de Wet. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 17 June 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Lancelot Rolleston, Lieutenant Colonel, Imperial Yeomanry. For services during operations in South Africa". He commanded the South Notts Hussars from 1897 to 1907, and commanded the Notts and Derby Mounted Brigade from 1908. He was created a KCB, 1911; was Chairman of Quarter Sessions for Nottinghamshire, 1912; was DL and JP and Honourable Colonel, South Nottinghamshire Hussars. He was Master and Huntsman of the Christ Church Harriers at Oxford, 1869-72, and of the Rufford Foxhounds, 1889-1900. He was in command of the Yeomanry Brigade at the Coronation of King George V, and was County Commandant of the Nottinghamshire Volunteer Regiment. Colonel Sir Lancelot Rolleston married, at Torquay, 25 February 1882, Lady Charlotte Emma Maud Dalzell, CBE, daughter of Colonel the Honourable R Dalzell and sister of the 12th Earl of Carnwath.
KCB (c), DSO, QSA (4) CC OFS Trans SA 02 (Maj, 12 Coy 3/IY), 1902 Coronation, 1911, Coronation, 1935 Jubilee, Territorial Decoration EDVII. Sothebys 1982 £800 (with wife's CBE). Glendinings 1989 est £900-1200.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Yeomanry
RomillyBertram Henry SamuelLieutenantROMILLY, BERTRAM HENRY SAMUEL, Lieutenant, was born 6 November 1878, eldest son of Samuel Henry Romilly, JP, DL, of Huntington Park, Herefordshire, and of Lady Arabella Charlotte (died 1897), eldest daughter of the 9th Earl of Southesk and sister of the 10th Earl. He entered the Army, 9 March 1898, as a Second Lieutenant in the Scots Guards. He was promoted Lieutenant 1 December 1899. Lieutenant Romilly served in the South African War from 1899 to 1902. He took part in the advance on Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May), and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal, May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria, and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Belfast (26 and 27 August); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in the Transvaal, December 1900 to July 1901; operations in Orange River Colony from July 1901; operations in Cape Colony, December 1900. He was mentioned twice in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Bertram Henry Samuel Romilly, Lieutenant, Scots Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". In 1903 he was attached to the Egyptian Camel Corps, and was employed with the Egyptian Army from December 1903 to August 1906, and again from September 1907, being in the interval Adjutant of the Scots Guards. He was promoted Captain 7 March 1904, and Major 16 September 1914. He served in the European War, 1914 to 1915, and was wounded. He was mentioned in Despatches and given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 10 March 1915. He was temporary Lieutenant Colonel, Scots Guards, from April to October 1917, and then became Temporary Lieutenant Colonel of the Reserve Battalion Scots Guards. In 1919 Lieutenant Colonel Romilly was appointed Military Governor of the province of Tiberias, Palestine. He married, in 1915, Nellie, daughter of Colonel Sir Henry Hozier (brother of Lord Newlands), and of Lady Blanche Hozier, daughter of the 7th Earl of Airlie, and they had two sons.
DSO, QSA (5) CC Drief Joh D-H Belf (Lt, Scots Gds), KSA (2) (Lt Scots Gds), 1914-15 Star (Maj, DSO), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Lt Col), 1935 Jubilee, 1937 Coronation, Order of the Nile (Egypt) 3rd Class, Order of Ismail (Egypt) 3rd Class, Order of Osmanieh (Turkey) 4th Class, Khedives Sudan (2) Talodi Nyima (unnamed), Khedives Sudan 1910 (2) South Kordofan Mandal (unnamed).Armoury 1987 £6,100 (with wifes medals). BDW 1991 est £2,500-3,100.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Scots Guards
RossCharlesCaptainROSS, CHARLES, Captain, was born 10 March 1864, third son of General Sir C C Ross, KCB; was educated at Stubbington, and gazetted to the Norfolk Regiment 12 November 1884; was promoted to Captain. He was attached to the Egyptian Army, 1893-1904, and was at the Staff College, 1897-99. Captain Ross served in the South African War, 1900-02, on the Staff, and was present at the Relief of Kimberley. Operations in the Orange River Colony, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February), actions at Poplar Grove, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain) and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal, in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria, and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June). Operations in the Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 26 July 1900) and Witpoort. Operations in the Orange River Colony, 30 November 1900 to June 1901. Operations in Cape Colony, June 1901 to January 1902. Operations in the Transvaal, January to May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April 1901], received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Charles Ross, Captain, Norfolk Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented by Major General A Wynne, CB, 19 November 1901. He was an Instructor at Woolwich, then three years an Instructor at Sandhurst, and was Instructor at the Staff College; became Colonel 4 October 1911. Colonel Ross served in the European War from 1914; was mentioned in Despatches, created a CB, and became Temporary Major General 15 November 1915; commanded 6th Division, BEF, from November 1915 to September 1917; was transferred to the 69th Division, which he commanded until reverted to unemployment, November 1918. He wrote 'Representative Government and War', 1903; 'The Problem of National Defence', 1907; and 'An Outline of the Russo-Japanese War, 1904 and 1905', 1912. Colonel Ross married, in 1905, Clara Marion, daughter of Reverend J E L Schreiber and widow of Captain S Horton, RA.
CB (m), DSO, QSA (5) RofK Paard Joh D-H Witt (Capt, Norfolk Regt), KSA (2) (Capt, DSO Norfolk Regt), 1914-15 Star (Brig-Gen DSO), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Maj-Gen). Glendinings 1987 est £500-600.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Norfolk Regiment
RossCharlesLieutenantROSS, CHARLES, Lieutenant, was born at Orange, New South Wales, the son of Scotch parents. He was educated at Santa Clara College, California, and became a Scout in the USA Service (Ness Percy, Indian War, 1877; Bannock, Indian War, 1878; Ute, Indian War, 1879). He was Chief of Scouts for Colonel Otter's Column in the North-Western Rebellion, Canada, in 1885, and was several times mentioned in Despatches. He had eight years' service in the North-West Mounted Police, Canada. In the South African War he served in Roberts's Horse as Lieutenant from January to April 1900, and was three times mentioned in Despatches. He served under General Hutton in command of the 1st MI Scouts from May to November 1900. Sir A Conan Doyle describes (page 529) in 'The Great Boer War' the campaign of January - April 1902. He tells us of a drive, sweeping backwards towards the Heilbron-Wolvehoek line, which ended in the total capture of 147 of the enemy, who were picked out of holes, retrieved from amid the reeds of the river, called down out of trees, or otherwise collected. So thorough was the operation, that it is recorded that the angle which formed the apex of the drive was one drove of game upon the last day, all the many types of antelope which form one of the characteristics and charms of the country having been herded into it. More important even than the results of the drive was the discovery of one of De Wet's arsenals in a cave in the Vrede district. Half-way down a precipitous krantz, with its mouth covered by creepers, no writer of romance could have imagined a more fitting headquarters for a guerrilla chief. The find was made by Ross's Canadian Scouts, who celebrated Dominion Day by this most useful achievement. Forty wagon-loads of ammunition and supplies were taken out of the cave". He was mentioned in Despatches, and for his services at Sanna's Post was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Charles Ross, Lieutenant, Roberts's Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 August 1901. He was subsequently promoted to Major. Major Ross married, in 1889, Nellie Buchanan, a Canadian lady of Scotch descent.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Roberts' Horse
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