Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: Died at sea

Died at sea 5 days 23 hours ago #61120

  • Elmarie
  • Elmarie's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 502
  • Thank you received: 320
My List of 280 deaths at sea



Elmarie Malherbe
Attachments:
The following user(s) said Thank You: BereniceUK

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Elmarie Malherbe

Died at sea 5 days 23 hours ago #61121

  • Elmarie
  • Elmarie's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 502
  • Thank you received: 320

Elmarie Malherbe
Attachments:
The following user(s) said Thank You: BereniceUK

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Elmarie Malherbe

Died at sea 5 days 21 hours ago #61123

  • Adrian123456
  • Adrian123456's Avatar
  • Away
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 162
  • Thank you received: 57
Thanks for this topic.

I have a medal pair to Captain J C Robinson, the master of the ship Kildonan Castle, involved in troop transports during the Boer War.

He wrote articles about various experiences, but this extract deals with a death and burial at sea off Moulle Point, Cape Town.These articles have been published in a book "To the Sea in Ships" .

Perhaps forum members can help figure out whose burial it must relate to?
Some clues are HM Transport No 44, fog bound season, single death etc.


".I was in the Kildonan Castle, H.M. Transport No. 44. We arrived in Table Bay one morning about six o’clock, with 2600 troops on board, the weather being very hazy, and the Bay crowded with vessels of all descriptions. I counted 70 myself, but there were more. We anchored off Moulle Point and signalled our arrival. One poor fellow, a soldier, died after we brought up — the only one we lost during the voyage.
The Port boat came off after breakfast, blowing his fog-horn, because it was getting very thick. Having received pratique, I reported the death, and requested that arrangements should at once be made to land the body for burial. This was agreed to as necessary, and the launch returned to attend to the business.
By the time he reached the dock the fog had closed down dense and white as milk, so that we could not see our own funnels 50 ft. away. The chorus of ship’s bells near and far in the calm, fog-bound bay was quite remarkable, and continued for three days and three nights without intermission!
We waited patiently for the return of the launch, keeping our ears open for any indication, but all in vain.
The third morning the surgeon and commanding officer came to me and asked what was to be done? After anxious consultation it was decided that we must bury at sea.
It goes without saying that I dare not move the ship, so the “office” must be performed by means of a lifeboat.
Let it be understood, first of all, that no “committal” must take place inside of 15 fathoms, and we were anchored in 8. A chart of the bay and approaches was laid out, and a position marked upon it with a cross upon it for the “launch.” The course from ship to the cross was laid off, and the distance measured. The lifeboat was fitted with a compass, and a patent log, as well as the chart, and a lead line. A special signal by foghorn was fixed upon, which was to be sounded every half minute exactly from the start until the return of the party. The second officer and boat’s crew who were to go, accompanied by t wo military officers, were put through a rehearsal of the programme.
The body was duly placed in the boat, and the funeral service was conducted on board immediately above; and as the firing party and the buglers made their “salute,” and sounded the “Last Post” on the forecastle head, the ambassadors of death departed on their mournful mission.
They were immediately lost to sight; even alongside the ship they had been but dimly visible from the deck, but the regular splash of the oars continued audible for a long time in the breathless calm that prevailed, and gradually died away into silence.
Our prearranged signal was religiously observed, and a tense and dramatic quietness pervaded the whole ship during the interval of sound.
I confess that I was extremely anxious myself. The conditions were so unprecedented. I knew that every human precaution had been taken, and that we had only done what was right and necessary; but the minutes dragged along with leaden measure — five, ten, twenty, forty! Hearts were thumping painfully; every ear was strained to the uttermost. A solitary boat, with nine men and a corpse, shut out from all audible or visible connection with a living world, upon a formless waste of secret waters! The mind conjured up all kinds of horrible possibilities.
Whispers here and there - listen - I think - I think - I’m sure - hush - it’s fancy - no - don’t you hear? I do - Yes! - and at last! After forty-five long-drawn minutes we did faintly hear that welcome rhythm as it gradually became audible to all — and a spontaneous cheer went up from 2000 throats that must have encouraged the still invisible members of that devoted band to a realisation of safety and renewed effort.
What a great relief it was to us all when we received them safely on board!
On questioning the second officer (whose name I cannot recall, I am sorry to say, though himself I remember perfectly) it would appear that we were not alone in conjuring up weird fancies. When they had reverently committed the body to its watery grave, it seemed for a moment to stand up in the fog and look at them; and though they pulled away manfully,-the impression remained that they were glued to the spot unable to get clear of the dread vision, until they picked up the sound of our special signal, and heard the cheers of the soldiers on board.
“Pray never send me away on such a duty again,” he added; “I would almost rather Ire buried myself!”






Regards

Adrian
Attachments:
The following user(s) said Thank You: BereniceUK

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Died at sea 5 days 21 hours ago #61124

  • SWB
  • SWB's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 1527
  • Thank you received: 315
In my research published last year I had recorded 355 deaths at sea, I have added a handful more since then.

I will check The Register to see if I can identify the "nine" - I had found seven deaths on HS Simla in May 1900.

Great story from the Kildonan Castle, shame it does not give any form of date. I will check The Register to see if this man can be identified. Interesting and ghoulish the wrapped corpse "stood up" as he was placed in the water. I guess they did not weight the corpse evenly, thus he sunk feet first. My father-in-law, a great boater, had his ashes placed in the Norfolk Broads (a great inland waterway). We did this one chilly February afternoon, as the urn was lowered into the water the boat he had used for the previous decade motored past as if in salute. Spooky.

Researcher & Collector
The Register of the Anglo-Boer Wars 1899-1902
theangloboerwars.blogspot.co.uk/

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Researcher & Collector
The Register of the Anglo-Boer Wars 1899-1902
theangloboerwars.blogspot.co.uk/

Died at sea 5 days 8 hours ago #61132

  • SWB
  • SWB's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 1527
  • Thank you received: 315
Adrian

The soldier in the description is very probably Pte 4020 J Taylor 4th bn West Yorkshire Rgt, attached 3rd bn.

Deaths At Sea records his death on 20-03-1900 at 6:30am in Cape Town aboard the Kildonan Castle. The Natal Field Force records his death as at Cape Town. He is the only one of the SS Kildonan deaths so described.

Regards
Meurig

Researcher & Collector
The Register of the Anglo-Boer Wars 1899-1902
theangloboerwars.blogspot.co.uk/
The following user(s) said Thank You: BereniceUK, Adrian123456

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Researcher & Collector
The Register of the Anglo-Boer Wars 1899-1902
theangloboerwars.blogspot.co.uk/

Died at sea 5 days 8 hours ago #61133

  • SWB
  • SWB's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 1527
  • Thank you received: 315

QSAMIKE wrote: We sighted a steamer the other day she reported (9) men dead and others sick with small pox, she was also bound for the Cape with Volunteers. .


I think the ship in question is the SS Armenian which had seven deaths, all from pneumonia between 16-27 Feb, 1900. The dead were all regulars or reservists, none served in a volunteer unit.

Researcher & Collector
The Register of the Anglo-Boer Wars 1899-1902
theangloboerwars.blogspot.co.uk/

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Researcher & Collector
The Register of the Anglo-Boer Wars 1899-1902
theangloboerwars.blogspot.co.uk/
Moderators: djb
Powered by Kunena Forum