Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC:

Boer War DSOs 5 months 3 weeks ago #69022

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 24434
  • Thank you received: 1913

Picture courtesy of DNW

DSO VR;
QSA (3) Cape Colony, Transvaal, Wittebergen (Captain E. J. G. Upton, Imp: Yeo:);
KSA (2) (Capt. E. J. G. Upton. I.Y.);
1914-15 Star (Lt. E. J. G. Upton Brands F.S. Rfls.);
British War and Bilingual Victory Medals (Lt. E. J. G. Upton.) the Victory Medal unnamed

DSO London Gazette 31 October 1902: ‘In recognition of services in recent operations in South Africa.’

MID London Gazette 29 July 1902.

The following recommendation for the D.S.O. was submitted by Lieutenant-Colonel F. L. Bannon, commanding 17th Bn. Imperial Yeomanry on 12 May 1902: ‘Captain E. J. G. Upton, Senior Captain - served in the ranks of the old I.Y. till given a commission in the new 17th Battn. Promoted Captain 25th May 01. Served since Febry 1900.

Nature of recommendation: A thoroughly reliable officer who has done good work on several occasions.

1. On 17th Sept 01 I made a night march with 70 of this officers men. Shortly after daybreak a laager was located 1500 yards away which I attacked. It was in a great measure owing to Captain Upton’s celerity in carrying out his orders that 17 adult Boers & 5 lads were captured.

2. On the 10th Oct 01 when Col H. Williams’ col engaged Nieuwhoudt & Hertzog near Jagersfontein this officer with 25 men, on his own initiative galloped a kopje under a cross fire & took 2 field cornets & 8 men prisoners.’

A lengthier report on the above actions was published in The Times on 2 December 1901.

Edward James Gott Upton was born in Loughton, Essex, on 17 October 1868, son of Major R. D. Upton, 9th Lancers, and Sophia Upton (née Turner). He was educated at Durham School and was working as a clerk when he attested for the Imperial Yeomanry at Canterbury on 8 January 1900, aged 31 years 2 months. He served in South Africa as a trooper in the 11th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry, receiving a commission as a Lieutenant in the 50th (Hants) Squadron, 17th Battalion I.Y. in March 1901, and becoming Captain on 25 May 1901. He was present in operations in the Orange Free State and in the engagements at Wittebergen. He was mentioned in despatches, awarded the Queen’s Medal with three clasps, the King’s Medal with two clasps, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order.

Upton settled in South Africa after the war and purchased Waschbank Farm in the Wepener district, Orange River Colony, in June 1903, where he raised Shorthorn cattle. He served with Brand’s Horse in the suppression of the Boer Rebellion in 1914 and in the European War in 1915 in German South-West Africa, Otzimbingue and Otavifontein. He married, in 1914, Joanna, second daughter of Vice-Admiral Wiliam Wilson, of Clyffe Manor, Swindon, Wiltshire.
Dr David Biggins
Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Boer War DSOs 2 months 3 weeks ago #70921

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 24434
  • Thank you received: 1913

Picture courtesy of DNW

DSO VR;
QSA (6) Cape Colony, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Wittebergen (Capt. J. F. Waterlow. CIV);
1914-15 Star (Lt. Col. J. F. Waterlow, DSO Bord. R.);
BWM and VM with MID oak leaves (Col. J. F. Waterlow.);
Coronation 1902, silver;
Territorial Decoration, EdVII, silver and silver-gilt, hallmarks for London 1909, with integral top riband bar

Together with the recipient’s related miniature award, in a fitted case of issue.

Together with the recipient’s City of London Imperial Volunteers for South Africa 1899-1900 Medallion, 76mm, bronze, the obverse featuring a seated female figure with sword, presenting the freedom of the city to a uniformed man in the City Imperial Volunteers, the reverse featuring the radiant sun of the British Empire shining behind a hill which is surmounted by a tall staff flying the Union Flag and CIV Flag, guarded by two guns, the edge inscribed in large capitals ‘J. F. Waterlow. Captn. CIV’, in fitted and embossed case of issue.

DSO LG 27 September 1901.

James Francis Waterlow was born in Marylebone, London in 1869, a great grandson of James Waterlow the founder of Waterlow & Sons, the major worldwide engravers of currency, postage stamps, stocks and bond certificates. Educated at Charterhouse School, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant into the 2nd Volunteer Battalion, Royal West Surrey Regiment on 7 December 1889, and was promoted Lieutenant 24 October 1891, and Captain 22 July 1893, being placed in charge of their Mounted Infantry detachment. Employed as a Director of Waterlow Bros. & Layton Ltd. of Birchin Lane and Upper Thames Street, he served with the 2nd Volunteer Battalion, Queen’s detachment in South Africa during the Boer War, with the Honorary Army rank of Captain.

As Officer Commanding No. 2 Mounted Infantry Company, City Imperial Volunteers, among Waterlow’s responsibilities in March 1900 was the command of the mounted escort guarding General Cronje and his wife, the Boer General having been placed under his charge following the Battle of Paardeberg. For his services during the Boer War he was Mentioned in Despatches (LG 10 September 1901) and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order. Following his return to England, Waterlow was reported by the City Press of 9 January 1901 to have been made a Livery Man of the Stationers’ Company in accordance with Resolution of 4 December 1900 and he received his DSO from the King on 28 October 1901.

Waterlow was promoted Major in the volunteers on 27 May 1903 and was awarded the Territorial Decoration. Following the outbreak of the Great War he was advanced Lieutenant-Colonel of the 1/4th (Cumberland and Westmoreland) Battalion, Border Regiment, his medal index card stating ‘Theatre of War first served in: Katshin Hills, Upper Burma, Jan 1915’. Remaining in India and Burma throughout the war, he found time to marry Rose Marie Lorentz on 24 February 1916 in Rangoon, and was Mentioned in Despatches (LG 26 November 1918). He died in London on 19 November 1942.

Dr David Biggins
Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Boer War DSOs 2 months 3 weeks ago #70978

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 24434
  • Thank you received: 1913

Pictures courtesy of DNW

DSO VR;
QSA (7) Cape Colony, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Wittebergen, Belfast (Capt. E. G. Concanon. CIV);
1914-15 Star (Lt. Col. E. G. Concanon. DSO 18/Lond. R.);
BWM and VM (Lt. Col. E. G. Concanon);
Territorial Decoration, GV silver and silver-gilt, hallmarks for London 1912, with integral top riband bar.

DSO LG 27 September 1901:
‘In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa.’

Edmond George Concanon (also spelt Concannon) was born at his grandfather’s house on Old Broad Street in the City of London on 24 June 1875, the son of James Blake Concanon of County Galway and Bertha Beckford Syvet. A stockbroker by profession, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the 16th Middlesex (London Irish) Rifle Volunteers on 25 March 1893 and advanced to Captain on 3 June 1896, serving as Honorary Lieutenant in the Army in South Africa during the Boer War with No. 2 Company, Mounted Infantry, City Imperial Volunteers.

Concanon is frequently mentioned in ‘The Record of the Mounted Infantry of the City Imperial Volunteers’ by Guillem Scott and McDonnell, particularly with regard to the fighting around Dulstoum on 4 September 1900. For his services in South Africa he was Mentioned in Despatches (LG 10 September 1901) and awarded the DSO On his return from South Africa he ‘was entertained on 5 November 1900 to a dinner at the Constitutional Club and presented with an inscribed piece of plate.’ (City Press 7 November 1900 refers).

Remaining a member of the Stock Exchange, in 1911 Concanon was a Major in the 18th Battalion, London Regiment (London Irish Rifles). He was awarded the Territorial Decoration in 1913, and appointed Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding the 18th London the same year, before becoming Officer Commanding 32nd (City of London) Battalion, London Regiment (East Ham) in 1918. He died in 1959.

Dr David Biggins
Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Boer War DSOs 1 month 1 hour ago #71888

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 24434
  • Thank you received: 1913

Pictures courtesy of DNW

DSO VR, silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar;
QSA (4) Cape Colony, Rhodesia, Orange Free State, Transvaal (Lieut. H. B. Christie N.S.W. CBC.) engraved in running script with unit added in engraved capitals;
BWM and VM (Lieut. H. B. Christie)

DSO LG 19 April 1901:
‘In recognition of services in connection with the Campaign in South Africa, 1899-1900, dated 29 November 1900 - Lieutenant, New South Wales Bushmen Contingent’.

General Orders by Major-General R. S. S. Baden Powell, Commanding Frontier Force, Rustenberg, 19 July 1900 - Gallantry:
‘Lt. H. B. Christie, 1st N.S.W. Regiment, who, when out with a patrol which was surprised by a party of Boers near Maguto Pass on July 18th, stayed with a man whose horse was shot and brought him out of fire, his shoulder being dislocated in doing so.’
By Order, (Signed) A. T. Godley, Lt. Col. A.H.G. Frontier Force.

MID LG 16 April 1901:
‘For meritorious services performed - Lieutenant, 1st New South Wales Bushmen Contingent.’

Herbert Bertram Christie was born in 1863 in Erith, Kent, England, the son of Marshall Christie, of Edinburgh and his wife Lucy. He was educated at Bedford School before being commissioned Lieutenant into the 3rd Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment on 11 February 1882. Resigning his commission in the Militia on 21 June 1884, he emigrated to Australia the same year where, in 1898, stating his occupation to be that of Station Manager of Cooma, New South Wales, he registered the Wyalong True Blue Gold-mining Company.

Christie served during the Boer War as a Lieutenant in the 1st New South Wales Bushmen, sometimes referred to as the ‘Citizen’s Bushmen Contingent’ as contrasted with the ‘Imperial Bushmen Contingent’, a later contribution. A mounted regiment, 530 strong, under Lieutenant-Colonel H. P. Airey DSO, they departed Sydney on 1 March 1900. On arriving in South Africa, the regiment was despatched by sea to Beira, Mozambique from where they had to cross a strip of Portuguese territory and the whole of Rhodesia to get to the Transvaal, where for some months they did good work under Majors-General Baden-Powell and Plumer.

Christie served under Airey during the engagements at the Relief of Rustenburg, 3 - 9 July 1900, during which he held Maguto Pass with a force of twenty men. Remaining at Maguto, on 18 July, Christie was injured on patrol while rescuing an unhorsed comrade, an act for which he was recognised by Baden-Powell in his General Orders and without doubt a major contributing factor to the awarding of his Distinguished Service Order. Christie describes these events in a letter, dated 13 August 1900:

‘On one of these patrols we had a rather narrow squeak of it. Lt. Allen and myself with 20 men were out after horses; I left him to look after some that were in sight and he had taken the men further on, when he rode straight into a nest of Boers. I had proceeded to rejoin him with my 4 men, when I met him in full retreat. They poured in a heavy fire from all parts and chased us for some miles in force. My experience was not a pleasant one, as the last of the men was dismounted and I had to go to his assistance. However I managed to get him up behind me and had proceeded about half a mile when down the horse came. We dived into the long grass until the Boers were out of sight and awaited their return - we then had to walk home. I can assure you I did not appreciate this, as in the fall I had partially dislocated my shoulder, which was rather painful... Being the last two into camp, all thought we were shot or captured; I am glad to say neither was the case, and I am all right again.’

The letter goes on to describe the difficult action which befell a mixed contingent of 275 Australians under Airey when attacked by a superior force of Boers at Koster River on 22 July, Christie arriving with the relief force in time to prevent them having to surrender or be killed. Nonetheless, there were 39 casualties incurred by Airey's bushmen in the six-and-a-half hour fight:

‘They had not proceeded more than 10 miles when they were completely surrounded and outnumbered. At 7 o’clock in the morning the Boers opened a terrible fire on men and horses, 8 of the former were killed and 21 wounded, and 200 of the latter were killed or taken. Hearing firing in the morning at the Pass we started off to the relief, about 300 strong, including 150 of the Protectorate Regiment: arriving on the scene about 1 o’clock. It was not until 4.30pm that we rejoined the Col., and certainly just in time to prevent them having to surrender to the Boers or be shot down. All round the house were the wounded, and numbers of dead and dying horses could be seen; it was far from being a pleasant sight.’

General Baden-Powell publicly thanked Colonel Airey and the Australian Bushmen for the dash and courage displayed during these engagements and Lieutenant Christie was among those especially singled out for eulogistic mention. Christie transferred to the South African Constabulary on 3 October 1900, later returning to New South Wales.

Volunteering for service following the outbreak of the Great War, he was appointed Second Assistant Superintendent in the Remount Service, Royal Army Service Corps, with the temporary rank of Lieutenant in May 1915, his medal index card stating that he served in France from 10 May 1915 (BWM and VM only). Lieutenant Christie died on active service on 9 December 1916, following complications resulting from a fall from his horse and is buried in Highgate Cemetery, London.

Sold with copied research including a period four page hand-typed copy of a letter by the recipient describing his experiences in South Africa, dated 13 August 1900. Also in the same typed style, using the same paper, a period copied extract of Baden-Powell’s General Orders dated 19 July 1900, listing the gallantry of Lieutenant H. B. Christie.

Dr David Biggins
Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Boer War DSOs 1 week 5 days ago #72262

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 24434
  • Thank you received: 1913
Christie's group sold for a hammer price of £4,400. Totals (inc VAT on the commission for the UK only): £5,667. R114,600. Au$9,900. Can$9,300. US$7,000
Dr David Biggins

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Boer War DSOs 4 days 6 hours ago #72381

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 24434
  • Thank you received: 1913

Pictures courtesy of DNW

DSO VR., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar;
QSA (4) Cape Colony, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill (Capt. M. A. Hilliard, DSO, N.S.W., M.R.) officially engraved naming;
Coronation 1902, silver,

DSO LG 19 April 1901: Captain M. A. Hilliard, New South Wales Mounted Infantry.
‘In recognition of services in connection with the Campaign in South Africa, 1899-1900.’

Maurice Alfred Hilliard was born at Gladstone, Queensland on 19 March 1863, the third son of Captain W. E. Hilliard, of Kensington, near Sydney and was educated at Sydney Grammar School. He was gazetted Second Lieutenant in the Artillery, 1886 and Lieutenant, Illawara Light Horse, 1887. Appointed Adjutant, Senior Cadet Battalion, 1891-92, he then served in India from 1892 to 1894 attached to the 2nd Dragoon Guards (Queen’s Bays) and the 1st Battalion, Devonshire Regiment. In 1894, he was appointed to the General Staff, and the following year was promoted Captain. From April 1894 to June 1895, he was Adjutant, 3rd Infantry Regiment, and from 1895 to 1900, Adjutant, 4th Infantry Regiment.

Captain Hilliard left for South Africa with the 2nd Contingent, New South Wales Mounted Infantry, in 1900, where he saw fighting from Modder River to Bloemfontein with Lord Roberts, thence with Major-General Sir E. T. H. Hutton, CB; under General French to Kronstad and with Major-General Ian Hamilton to Pretoria and beyond. In a letter to an unnamed Colonel dated 11 July 1900, Hilliard described the attack at the Vet River:
‘The 5th May saw us (for the first time actually engaged under General Hutton) at the Vet River. My Squadron led the attack and after a sharp gallop under shell fire we left our horses under cover and advanced in extended order on foot. The advance was over perfectly level ground without any cover whatever and as the firing was very heavy (shell fire, pom-pom, Maxim and rifle) we had a trying time, but rapidly crossing over the 1,500 yards of open, succeeded in driving the Boers out of the drift. Taking a breather under this welcome shelter we again advanced across the open on the opposite side and stormed the kopje held by the enemy. Our advance was so rapid they were obliged to leave a Maxim behind which we captured. We also seized six or seven prisoners and accounted for a good many killed. None of our men were killed and only a few slightly wounded, which considering the rain of bullets is to me marvellous. I can only attribute such luck to the rapidity with which we moved and the excellent way intervals were maintained. General Hutton was too generous in his remarks when congratulating me personally - but the warm praise he bestowed upon my Squadron in particular and the Regiment generally was well deserved and will ever be warmly cherished by us all.’

The same letter contains an account of his experiences at the Battle of Diamond Hill 11-12 June 1900:
‘On the 11th and 12th inst. we had some of the hottest fighting on the Campaign... Just about 3:00 p.m. our turn came - advancing across the veldt for about half a mile (in columns of troop in extended order) at a walk we then broke into a hot trot and when another half mile had been covered we broke into a gallop and made for the sheltering base of part of the Kopje straight in front of us. After a most exciting gallop of a mile partly under fire we reached the shelter for our horses, dismounted and then scaled the Kopje. My Squadron was first up. It was a difficult climb especially after a trying gallop but our men never hesitated and we soon reached the first rugged "table top". The bullets began to hiss in real earnest so we dashed across the open and gained the next line of pinnacle rocks. Keeping firing we halted for a little while and then made another rush for the next line of shelter. Seeing the Boers retreating bayonets were fixed and a dash forward made which was too much for them and they "scattered". A Field Cornet was shot and his cousin after narrowly shooting Lieutenant Newman through the head was made prisoner. The Boers managed to get away all their other dead and wounded. At this juncture they opened a big gun on us at very short range also two pom poms, and discovering that we were being enfiladed with rifle fire on the left, I ordered the men to lie flat behind cover and so we remained and longed for darkness not daring to lift our heads up to reply to their fire except by an occasional volley. Poor Drage fell just on my left shot through the left head – also though he lived a little while he was dead when I saw him. Captain Holmes was wounded in the right forearm but pluckily stayed with me all night on the Kopje which we had to hold. Harriott's loss was a great sorrow to me as I had become greatly attached to him... Next day finding the Boers had cleared we gave chase and got on to their rear guard about 6 miles out and chased them up at the historical Bronkhorst Spruit.’

Hilliard was mentioned in Lord Roberts’ despatch of 29 November 1900 (LG 16 April 1901) in connection with his leading of the bayonet charges at Vet River (1900) and Diamond Hill (1900) and was made a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order, the insignia being presented to him by the Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales on his return to Australia. He continued to serve on the General Staff, New South Wales Military Forces and, as Adjutant, 1st Infantry Regiment, he was selected to serve as an advance agent for the New South Wales detachment of the Coronation Contingent which sailed for England in April 1902. He died at Sydney, New South Wales on 11 April 1907.

Dr David Biggins
Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Moderators: djb
Time to create page: 2.069 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum