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TOPIC: Cape Colony

Cape Colony 6 years 1 week ago #14629

  • LinneyI
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Mike
My copy of the CMR roll shows bar CC as well as SA01 and SA02. No KSA.
Regards
IL.

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Cape Colony 6 years 1 week ago #14635

  • capepolice
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Mike,

3744 Pte Philip Robert Moss attested into the CMR on the 21st February 1901 in England. He was 19 years old at the time.

His page in the Cape Archives confirms clasps CC, SA 1901 and SA 1902. Discharged 8th June 1912.

Regards
Adrian
Part time researcher of the Cape Police and C.P.G Regiment.

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Cape Colony 6 years 1 week ago #14641

  • QSAMIKE
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Adrian and Linney......

Thanks for the additional information......

Mike
Life Member
Past-President Calgary
Military Historical Society
O.M.R.S. 1591

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Cape Colony 6 years 5 days ago #14727

  • djb
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An 1894 DSO group to Colonel A H Morgan, RAMC.


Picture courtesy of Bonham

DSO (VR), Order of St.John, Knight of Justice, Egypt (0) (Surgeon A.H.Morgan. A.M. Dept), East and West Africa, (2) 1891-2, 1893-94 (Surg: Capt.A.H.Morgan. A.M.S.), QSA (1) CC (Major A.H.Morgan, D.S.O. R.A.M.C.), Khedive's Star, dated 1882.


Picture courtesy of Bonham

Colonel Anthony Hickman Morgan was born in Dublin on the 29th June 1858, he was the son of the late Captain Anthony Morgan of the 95th Foot. He was educated in Dublin where he took the L.R.C.S.I. and L.K.Q.C.P. in 1880. He entered the Army as a Surgeon on the 5th February 1881. He served in the Egyptian campaign in 1882, and served in the Expedition against the native chief, Fodey Kabba, 1891-92. Then again on the West Coast of Africa, 1893-94, and in the operations against the Sofas. In 1894 he was again on active service in Gambia in the expedition against the native chief, Fodey Silah where he was mentioned in Despatches and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order. He retired on the 12th February 1896. On the 7th July 1897 he was appointed Major and honorary Lieutenant-Colonel of the 17th (Volunteer) Battalion of the Rifle Brigade.

He served aboard the hospital ship Princess of Wales in South Africa, 1889-1900 as Officer Commanding troops and P.M.O. where he was again mentioned in despatches.

In 1904 he served as High Sheriff of County Cork and in the same year became a Knight of Grace of the Order of St.John of Jerusalem. In 1906 he unsuccessfully contested the Isle of Wight as Conservative canditdte. He was additionally a J.P. and D.L. for County Cork an F.R.G.S. and F.Z.S., and was a member of the Iron and Steel Institute. He died at Cowes, Isle of Wight on the 29th September 1924, aged 66.

The London Gazette of the 27th February 1894 had a detailed report of the expedition against the Sofas where he was mentioned as follows: "Surgeon-Major A.H.Morgan, A.M.S., was Senior Medical Officer to the expedition, and, owing to the miscarriage of a letter sent to the Medical Officer at Kommendi, was in sole charge of the wounded from December 19 to January 7. The difficulties in transporting the wounded in hammocks over a country such as the expedition traversed, and where the cutlass was constantly required to cut a way, seemed to me at times almost insurmountable, and that the expedition was not greatly delayed was entirely due to Surgeon-Major Morgan's great personal energy".
Dr David Biggins
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Cape Colony 5 years 11 months ago #15053

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The medals awarded to Capt Frederick Whitworth-Jones, SAMIF.


Pictures courtesy of Dreweatts

QSA (1) CC (Capt: F. W. Jones. S.A.M.I.F.), KSA (2) (Capt: W. F. [sic] Jones. S.A.M.I.F.). Officially impressed.

Frederick Whitworth Jones was born on the 9th of October 1867, the first son of Henry Whitworth-Jones, a notable Opera Singer (1817-1891) and contemporary of Charles Dickens. He attended Radley College, and was commissioned as Second Lieutenant in the 4th Battalion King’s Shropshire Light Infantry on the 28th of January 1888, but having reached Lieutenant, he then transferred to the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry again as Second Lieutenant on the 21st December, 1889.

By the time of the Boer War he was serving with the South African Mounted Irregular Force, and is reported as having been involved with the railways there. His regular address is mentioned in the London Gazette as also being at Brook House, Pulham St Mary Diss, Norfolk, noted in respect to the death of his mother Maria Whitworth Jones at this residence, in July 1905. He died on the 27th of June, 1935, at The Hatch, Seend, Wiltshire.

He may also have been involved with the British Olympic Council c.1914. Sold with associated miniatures, copy QSA roll mention, and some associated research. He is possibly of some relation to Captain Stewart Gilbert Macdonald.
Dr David Biggins
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Cape Colony 5 years 10 months ago #15987

  • davidh
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Gentlemen

The so often disregarded 'humble' QSA with single clasp CC always draws my attention especially if it is named to a Highland Regiment. Men KIA/DOW, and quite often men wounded, at Magersfontein usually got a single clasp CC. The regiments I always look out for are Black Watch, Gordons, HLI, Argylls and Seaforths although the Camerons weren't there and most of the Argylls had already qualified for the Modder River clasp. I picked up a single clasp CC to a private in the Black Watch KIA some years ago.

Similarly, some years ago I picked up a single CC to a private in the Yorkshire Regiment KIA in the action at New Zealand Hill, Slingersfontein 15/1/1900.

Regards

David

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