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TOPIC: Died at sea

Died at sea 9 months 2 weeks ago #61503

  • BereniceUK
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From a letter home by 8182 Private E. Smeeton, Royal Army Medical Corps, which appeared in The Derbyshire Times, Saturday 6th January 1900 - "We had a very nice voyage out.....We had one death on board ship, and he was thrown overboard. I felt sorry for him. He leaves a wife and two children in England."

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Died at sea 6 months 2 weeks ago #62668

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C. J. G. Weston appears in Elmarie's list of 'died at sea,' but with no known date of death. According to a newspaper report he died on Monday 29th October 1900.

Reporting on the return of the City of London Imperial Volunteers to England, the Essex County Chronicle [Friday 2nd November 1900] said: - "London suffered a bitter disappointment on Saturday...….word passed round that the Aurania could not possibly arrive at Southampton until too later in the day for the official programme to be carried out. The troop ship was docked twenty-four hours late......The Aurania left her anchorage off Netley Hospital before eight o'clock on Monday morning and was berthed in Southampton Dock at 7.50......As the disembarkation proceeded the sad tidings were announced that Private C. J. G. Weston, who was reported on Saturday night as dangerously ill from enteric fever, died at 4.30 that morning. Pt. Weston was a member of the 2nd Vol. Batt. West Surrey Regt., and he had become very popular among his comrades in the C.I.V."

Later in the same article: - "The funeral of Private Weston, of Godalming, the member of the C.I.V. whose death is recorded above, took place yesterday afternoon at Busbridge, near Godalming, with full military honours. Many C.I.V.'s were present."

So he died at sea, but his body was brought ashore for burial.
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Died at sea 6 months 2 weeks ago #62669

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Very good, thanks Berenice. I had Weston's death as 29-10-1900 At sea SS Aurania, this came from the premier CIV collector and researcher, Jack Webb.

Interesting to note his body was bought ashore. He is commemorated in St Peter & St Paul, Godalming, not St. John the Baptist in Busbridge.

Presumably there is a gravestone for him? As this is within striking distance of where I live I would be able to visit it.
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Died at sea 1 month 3 weeks ago #65017

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TROOPSHIP'S TRAGIC VOYAGE.

SENSATIONAL INCIDENTS ON BOARD THE CANADA.
The homeward voyage of the Canada, which has arrived at Southampton with troops from the Cape, was so unusually full of sorrowful incidents that a complete damper was put on the spirits of all on board.

The ship left Table Bay on July 18, and the following day Gunner Findley of the Hants Militia Artillery, jumped overboard, and was drowned. It is believed that his mind was affected.

Some days afterwards Lieutenant Poole, a Yeomanry officer, died of dysentery, and was buried at sea. Among those who were nearest to that part of the deck from which the body was committed to the deep was Captain Shaw-Stewart, of the 17th Lancers, son of Sir Michael and Lady Octavia Shaw-Stewart, of Fonthill Abbey, Wilts. Just after the service had commenced he fell overboard.

Again, as in the case of Findley, every possible attempt was made at rescue. The boats remained out for fully an hour, but though some of the lifebuoys thrown over immediately the cry of "Man overboard!" was raised, were recovered, nothing was seen of Captain Shaw-Stewart from the moment he touched the water.

The date of this tragic occurrence was Sunday, July 28th, when the ship was three days the other side of Las Palmas. The explanation which finds most general acceptance is that the ill-fated officer, being desirous of taking a snapshot of a funeral at sea, climbed on to the rail to make a more effective use of his kodak, and then, suddenly overbalancing himself, fell headlong into the sea.

The Western Gazette, Friday 9th August 1901

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