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TOPIC: DCMs for the Boer War

DCMs for the Boer War 6 months 4 weeks ago #61732

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DCMs for the Boer War 5 months 2 weeks ago #62260

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DCM, V.R (951 Clr:-Serjt: G. Trivett. Devon: Regt.);
QSA (5) TH OFS RoL Tr LN (951 C.Sgt. G. Trivett, Devon: Regt.);
KSA (2) (Clr:-Serjt: G. Trivett. Devon: Regt.);
Army LS&GC EdVII (951 Clr:-Serjt: G. Trivett. Devon: Regt.);
Army MSM GV (3/7390 S.Mjr. G. Trivett. Devon: R.)

DCM London Gazette 27 September 1901. MID London Gazette 8 February 1901 and 10 September 1901. MSM (Immediate) London Gazette 22 February 1919.

George Trivett was born in 1866 at Axminster, Devon, and enlisted into the 4th Battalion, Devonshire Regiment Militia on 26 July 1884, and, on 9 September following, joined the 2nd Battalion. He was promoted to Lance-Corporal on 27 February 1888; Corporal, 14 November 1889; Lance-Sergeant, 30 October 1891; Sergeant, 1 March 1894; Colour-Sergeant, 16 April 1895. Following outstanding service in the Boer War, gaining two mentions and the DCM, Trivett was posted to the Permanent Staff of the 4th Volunteer Battalion, Devonshire Regiment, as Colour-Sergeant Instructor on 1 March 1902. He received the LS&GC medal in 1903, and was discharged in the rank of Colour-Sergeant on 28 March 1910. On the outbreak of war in 1914, he re-joined the 6th Battalion, Devonshire Regiment, for the period of the war, and served as Regimental Sergeant-Major to that battalion, on Home Service only. He received a ‘Class B’ mention in February 1917 and was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal in February 1919. On leaving the Army, he worked for Devon County Council as a School Attendance Officer, and died in Pembroke, Wales, in September 1932.
Dr David Biggins
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DCMs for the Boer War 5 months 2 weeks ago #62304

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DCM VR (3191 L. Corpl. R. Edmondstone, Gordon Highrs.);
IGS 1895 (3) Relief of Chitral 1895, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98, clasp carriage altered to accommodate additional clasps (3191 Lce. Cpl. R. Edmondston [sic], 1st Bn. Gordon Highrs.);
QSA (5) CC Paar Drie Joh Belf (3191 Pte. R. Edmondston [sic], Gordon Highrs.);
KSA (2) (3191 Pte. R. Edmondstone, Gordon Highrs.)

DCM London Gazette 27 September 1901.

R. Edmondstone attested for the Gordon Highlanders, and served with the 1st Battalion as part of the Chitral Relief Force under Major-General Sir R. C. Low, K.C.B. Serving at the forcing of the Malakand Pass, he was slightly wounded by buckshot on 3 April 1895 (London Gazette 15 November 1895). For his services in the campaign, his name was brought to the notice of Brigadier-General H. G. Waterfield, Commanding 2nd Brigade. Edmondstone subsequently served with the Tirah Expeditionary Force under Sir William Lockhart, K.C.B., K.C.S.I., against the Afridi and Orakzai tribes.

Edmondstone then served in the Boer War and was mentioned in Lord Robert’s despatch of 4 September 1901 (London Gazette 10 September 1901), and was subsequently awarded the DCM for his services.

The regimental history records an incident during the battle of Magersfontein, 11 December 1899, following the initial retirement when the Highland Brigade was repulsed in their disastrous attempt to take the hill. A Boer shell dropped near a group of Highlanders crowded around a water-cart. It was noted that, ‘The Gordon water-cart had been pretty far forward before this, for Lance-Corporal Edmondstone, in charge, was mentioned for gallantry. He was very strict in not serving without orders, and no man got a second drink.’

Elsewhere in the regimental history it is recorded, ‘Lance-Corporal Edmondstone, end man of many a tug-of-war team, one of the original machine-gun squad of the battalion; and so big that he was allowed an extra half-ration daily. Someone gives his weight as 19 stone, but I consider that a libel; anyway he did his marches well enough.’
Dr David Biggins
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DCMs for the Boer War 5 months 1 day ago #62477

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A Boer War D.C.M. group of four awarded to Sergeant W. McDine, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, late Royal Highlanders, who was wounded at Paardeberg Drift, 18 February 1900

DCM Ed VII (5924 Serjt: J. W. McDine. Arg: & Suth: Hdrs:);
Egypt, dated reverse (4) Suakin 1884, El-Teb, The Nile 1884-85, Kirbekan (2331. Drumr. J. W. McDine. 1/R. Hrs.);
QSA (2) MR Paard (5924, Serjt. W. McDine, A & S. Highrs.);
Khedive’s Star 1882,

DCM London Gazette 27 September 1901.

John William McDine attested for the Royal Highlanders (Black Watch), and served as a Drummer during the Egypt and Sudan Expedition 1882-85. Transferring to the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, he was advanced Sergeant and served in South Africa during the Boer War, being wounded at Paardeberg Drift on 18 February 1900.
Dr David Biggins
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DCMs for the Boer War 5 months 1 day ago #62478

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DCM Ed VII (5572 Serjt: J. Barfield. R. Warwick: Regt.);
IGS 1895 (2) Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98 (2780 ..ce. Corpl. J. Barfield 2d. Bn. D... Regt.)
QSA (3) CC OFS Tr (... Cpl. J. Barfield . Rl. Warwick: Regt.)
KSA (2) (5573 Serjt; J. Barfield. Rl: Warwick: Regt.);
1914-15 Star (6438. C.S.Mjr. J. Barfield. Notts. & Derby R.);
BWM & VM (6438 W.O. Cl.1. J. Barfield. Notts. & Derby. R.) VM officially renamed;
Army LS&GC GV (122021 C.S. Mjr: J. Barfield. Lab: C.)

DCM London Gazette 31 October 1902.

MID London Gazette 9 July 1901: ‘Near Vet River, Orange River Colony, on 7th April 1901, with only a native scout, pursued six armed Boers and rode down one, and shot him when he refused to surrender. He behaved with great dash. (Mentioned in General Tucker’s special despatch of 9th April 1901).’

MID London Gazette 18 July 1902:
‘For several acts of gallantry in action, and especially for single-handed capture of Boers on 20th April 1902.’

John Barfield was born in Leicester in 1871 and attested for the Derbyshire Regiment at Derby on 17 April 1890, having previously served in the Regiment’s 5th (Militia) Battalion. Posted to the 2nd Battalion, he served with the Regiment in India from 11 November 1891 to 23 March 1898, and took part in the Tirah Campaign as pat of the 1st Brigade of the main column. Their first action was at the Battle of Dargai, 20 October 1897, in which the Battalion was awarded a Victoria Cross and two Distinguished Conduct Medals. Throughout the campaign, the Derbyshires suffered casualties in encounters at Dargai, Karappa, Grandakai, Matsura, Waran Valley, Sappri Pass, Barg, and Karamna. Appointed Lance-Corporal on 9 October 1897, Barfield survived the six-month campaign unscathed, and on returning home transferred to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment on 28 March 1898. Promoted Corporal on 1 July of that year, he served with the 3rd Battalion in Malta from that date, before proceeding to South Africa as a member of the Warwickshires’ section in the Malta Horse for service during the Boer War on 20 February 1900.

Disembarking at East London on 1 April 1900, the Malta Horse was employed principally on duties as advance guards, flank patrols, and scouts, as well as night-time forays and intelligence gathering activities. Most of their operations took place in the Orange Free State. Their first casualties were incurred on 15 April 1900 when they were acting as part of the advance guard in the relief of Wepener.

The Warwickshires’ section of the Malta Horse were moved to the Vet River on 16 January 1901, by which time they had been reduced to just 15 men by means of casualties, illness, and reassignments. They remained at this location for just over four months, and were particularly active in numerous scouting expeditions, forays, and skirmishes along the Boers’ line of communications. It was during this period that Barfield, having been promoted to Sergeant on 5 February 1901, received his first Mention in Despatches.

Moving to the Kroonstad district in the latter part of 1901, after having performed several successful night excursions from Winberg, they continued to be employed on night expeditions. Their last action took place on 20 April 1902, when they were attached to the 9th Battalion, Mounted Infantry. The Battalion attacked a group of about 80 Boers of Nigil’s Commando at the town of Scotland West, and for his gallantry in this action Barfield was again Mentioned in Despatches- unable to re-load his rifle, he was ‘singularly successful with the butt-end of his rifle. Five Boers were killed and 20 taken prisoner.’ (The Antelope, the Journal of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, September 1902 refers).

For his services in South Africa Barfield was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, almost certainly as a result of the gallantry that he had shown on the two occasions when he was Mentioned in Despatches.

Having been discharged on 21 August 1902, Barfield re-enlisted at Derby in the Royal Garrison Regiment on 10 March 1903, and saw further service in Malta and South Africa. He was discharged at Bloemfontein on 15 April 1905, with the stated intention of joining the South African Constabulary. Attesting for the South African Constabulary 29 April of that year, he was posted to ‘G’ Troop, and served in the Ladybrand District. he was discharged on the reduction of the establishment on 29 February 1908, and returned to England.

Following the outbreak of the Great War, Barfield re-enlisted in the Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment (as his old Regiment had become) at Derby on 2 September 1914. Promoted Company Sergeant-Major on 5 October 1914, he served during the Great War on the 14 July 1915, and was advanced Warrant Officer Class I on 4 August 1916. Transferring to the 17th Labour Battalion, Labour Corps, as Acting Regimental Sergeant Major in August 1916, he was elevated to the same position at Headquarters, 12th Labour Group, on 14 May 1917. He returned to England on 9 September 1918, and was discharged as ‘being no longer physically fit for war service’ on 6 February 1919. He was awarded his Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, together with a gratuity of £5, on 3 February 1920.
Dr David Biggins
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DCMs for the Boer War 4 months 3 weeks ago #62554

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DCM Ed VII (2976 CLR:-SERGT: J.H. ANSLEY. RL: BERKS: REGT);
QSA (3) CC OFS Tr (2976 SGT J. ANSLEY. 2ND RL: BERKS: REGT);
KSA (2) (2976 CLR:-SERGT: H. ANSLEY. RL: BERKS: REGT)

James Henry Ansley (note differing initials on campaign medals but same service number) was born in Southwark, London, and worked as a porter before attesting for short service into the British Army at London on 31st July 1890, and joining as a Private (No.2976) the Royal Berkshire Regiment at Reading on 2nd August 1890. Ansley was posted from the Depot to the 2nd Battalion on 20th November 1890, and gained his Mounted Infantry Certificate at Aldershot on 23rd September 1891, being then appointed to Lance Corporal on 5th July 1892, being granted his 1st Good Conduct Pay on 12th November 1892, being then promoted to Corporal on 23rd December 1894, he was permitted to extend his service to complete 12 years with the Colours at Devonport on 6th May 1896, and was then appointed to Lance Sergeant on 5th August 1896. Promoted to Sergeant on 24th October 1897, and was posted with his Battalion to South Africa for garrison duty from 13th February 1898.

With the outbreak of the Boer War in South Africa, he then saw service on operations in the Cape Colony, the Orange Free State, and the Transvaal through to 15th October 1902. The award of the Distinguished Conduct Medal for gallant and distinguished conduct in South Africa was published in the London Gazette for 31st October 1902, this being awarded to him together with his Mention in Despatches in Lord Kitchener's Final Despatch as Commander in Chief on leaving South Africa, and awarded to him in the rank of Colour Sergeant which he held whilst on service in South Africa. Ansley was discharged after 12 years and 87 days serviced on 25th October 1902.
Dr David Biggins
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