Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC:

Medals to the CIV 2 years 8 months ago #56639

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Away
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 24139
  • Thank you received: 1836

Gen Sir W H MacKinnon



Pictures courtesy of Glendining's

QSA (4) CC OFS Joh DH (Maj. Gen. W. H. MacKinnon, C of L.I.V.)
1897 Jubilee
1902 Coronation
1911 Coronation

Mackinnon, Lt. Gen. Sir (William) Henry, entered army, 1870; served in Grenadier Guards, was Adjt. 2nd Bat.; Mil. Secy, to Governor of Malta, 1884 - 85; Private Secy, to Governor of Madras, 1885 — 87; Colonel, 1889; A.A.G., Home District, 1893 — 98; served South Africa, 1900 (despatches, Queen’s medal, 4 clasps, C.B.); C.Vol. commanding City of Lond. Imperial Volunteers, 1899—1900; Director of Auxilliary Forces, 1905 — 8; Director-General of the Territorial Force, 1908-1910. Lieut. Gen. Sir William Henry Mackinnon, G.C.B. created 1908. Colonel of the Liverpool Regiment. Entered the army in 1870, served in the Grenadier Guards. Military Secretary to Governor of Malta 1884 — 85. Private Secretary to Governor of Madras 1885 - 87. Colonel of City of London Imperial Volunteers, 1899 — 1900.

Lineage:- Clan Fingon (Mackinnon) is one of seven Highland Clans which trace their descent to the younger son of the King of the Scots who was killed in battle near Dundee A.D. 837.

On Dec. 1899 Col. Mackinnon was summoned to the War Office, and was offered by Lord Wolseley the command of the City Imperial Volunteers. The Lord Mayor of London had previously been to the Commander in Chief and had offered to raise a regiment of infantry, with mounted infantry attached, to clothe, equip, and transport them by sea to Cape Town, where they would be taken over by the War Office. This offer had been accepted, the C. in C.reserving to himself the right to nominate the Lieut. Cols, and certain of the officers. The City Imperial Volunteers was formed from men drawn from 51 Volunteer units in Greater London area. Most of the units had been in existence for 40 years, and had never seen active service. They were untried in battle, but like the Civil Defence Corps they won glory. The City of London donated £25,000 to equip the Corps, and promised that when they returned that every man accepted for die C.I.V., would be granted the Freedom of London. Their names are recorded in bound volumes, 1,756 Freemen of the City. Col. Mackinnon, commanded C.I.V. troops, and held a unique position “HITHERTO UNPRECEDENTED IN THE ANNALS OF OUR MILITARY HISTORY”.
Dr David Biggins
Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Medals to the CIV 2 years 8 months ago #56640

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Away
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 24139
  • Thank you received: 1836
The catalogue notes that this is the only medal to the CIV named to the LIV.
Dr David Biggins

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Medals to the CIV 2 years 8 months ago #56652

  • Adrian123456
  • Adrian123456's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 227
  • Thank you received: 101
Hi
I have several medals to the C.I.V., as well as this one to a soldier associated to the C.I.V, but named to the F.I.D.

Interpreter W.B. Faure, F.I.D. Clasps CC, OFS, Tvl



Philippus Albertus Brand Faure
Born 9 Aug 1875 , Died 9 February 1947



The QSA Roll page, on which Mr. Faure is the only claimant, was signed by Lt. Col. W. Cholmondeley and was originally headed “City of London Imperial Volunteers” and Mr. Faure’s rank was given as Lieutenant. However, the heading was changed to Field Intelligence Department and the rank to Interpreter, with a pencilled note below the ruled-through “Lieut” reading “Local”.
Under “Remarks” it was stated “Served with Mounted Infantry of City of London Imp. Vols. from 29th January to 7th October 1900”. That poses a question as to why Mr. Faure did not receive any battle bars. To further cloud the issue, another pencilled note reads “Correct initials are P.A.B.”.
Military career:

PABF was involved in the Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902) for its duration, and served with the British. He was 24 when he joined the War effort.
Judging by his photograph in uniform if seems as though he was a Major. I seem to recall father JPMF (1917-2005) telling me that PABF also acted as an Interpreter during the Boer War. During the last Boer War he was also attached to the CIV (Civil Imperial Volunteers) for nine months and was the only South African who received the Lord Mayor’s Medal which was struck in commemoration of the raising and equipping of the CIV. PABF held four other medals: “Queen’s South Africa”, “King’s South Africa”, “Jubilee Medal 1935”, “Coronation Medal 1937” (source MJH).
Farming career: It is reasonable to assume that after the Boer War Albie farmed – because his father died in 1902 and Albie inherited the farms “Bleak House” and “Dynefontein”. He must have farmed the former because the latter farm was poor in terms of soil quality (sandy). PABF sold “Bleak House” in 1920 and bought “Kahlenberg” in Faure in that year and farmed it with sons JPMF and HMF.
He was a part-time Farmer from when he became a Member of Parliament in 1929 until his death in 1947.
Parliamentary career: It is likely that Sir Pieter Hendrik FAURE encouraged PABF to enter politics. He stood for the South African Party (which later became the United Party) for the Hottentots Holland Constituency (then much larger than Strand, Somerset West and Gordon’s Bay) in the election of 12.06.1929. He was elected (at age 54) and it is recorded that he was “very popular” and did much for his constituency. He opened / laid the foundation stones of a number of public amenities / utilities, including: “Faure Marine Drive” (from Gordon’s Bay to close to Kogel Bay, from where it is named “Clarence Drive”) (in 2014 an international travel company judged Faure Marine Drive / Clarence Drive to be the most spectacular marine drive in the world); “Faure Street” (Gordon’s Bay, from Beach Road to Faure Marine Drive); “Gordon’s Bay Harbour” (in the early 1930s); “Bridge at Melkbaai” (Strand: the bridge over the Lourens River); “Town Hall” (Somerset West); “Volkskerk van Afrika Weeshuis” (orphanage); “Steenbras River Dam”.
PABF was appointed a Senator in 1942 and was thereafter referred to as “The Honourable Senator PAB FAURE” (newspaper clippings). He served on three Government Commissions (see below).
Board / club memberships, etc.: PABF served on many boards / was member of: Member of the Stellenbosch Divisional Council (first appointed in 1917) and later its Chairman; Member (and later Chairman) of the Lower Eerste River Board for 25 years; Member (and twice Vice-President and twice President) of the Divisional Councils Association of the Cape (in 1942 elected the Life President of the Association); Member of the Nelspoort Sanatorium; Member1820 Settlers’ Association; Director of the Western Province Tobacco Company (for many years); Served on the Stellenbosch Licensing Court; Member of the Stellenbosch University Council; Member of a School Board (not sure which one); Member of a Hospital Board (not sure which one, but probably Hottentots Holland Hospital or Stellenbosch Hospital); Member of the Cape Land Board for 11 years; Member of the Orange River Island Commission; Member of the Richtersveld Commission; Member of the Ebenezer Commission; Director of the Colonial Mutual Insurance Company; Director of the South Africa Clothing Company; Director of the Hottentots Holland Board of Executors; Honorary Treasurer of the Athlone Blind School; Member of the Masonic Lodge (from 1903) and the Masonic Education Fund; Member of Civil Service Club, Cape Town.
Sport: PABF took a keen interest in all sports, but particularly rugby and Shooting. He was a Member of “Gardens Rugby Club” and played for the first team for many years (5 years according to daughter Helen), and became its Vice-President. He twice represented the Cape Colony in the Inter-Colonial Shooting Shield. He was also a member of the first rowing club in South Africa, the “Alfred Rowing Club”, in Cape Town (which still exists in 2015).
Church activities: Keenness in or indifference to spiritual matters is not known, but he and “Dolly” were members of the DRC in Stellenbosch or Somerset West. It is likely that both sets of parents were members of the DRC.
Marriage: PABF was married in 1914 to Emerentia Elizabeth MORKEL (1883-1950) (details given above) of “Onverwaght” later called “Die Bos”. She was called “Dolly” and was of the famous rugby MORKEL family. There was talk of a rugby team in the area made up of 15 Morkels. The Somerset West Rugby Club first team of 1913 had 7 MORKEL’s in the side (all related). The 1913-1914 Springbok side had 7 MORKEL’s in the side, and the 1921 side had 5 in the team [WH (“Boy”) MORKEL was the Captain]. Dolly was one of 6 sisters, all endowed with feminine pulchritude. She read Music at the Conservatorium of Music at Stellenbosch University, and was a Music Teacher. She was also an Organist in the Somerset West DRC. (Part of the rugby information: Van der Merwe, GJ, 2013. “Die Morkels van die Bos”. Somerset West: GJ Van der Merwe.)
Property: As noted above, Albie inherited the farms “Bleak House” and “Dynefontein”. “Bleak House” was wedged between “Vergenoegd” and “Zandvliet”. “Dynefontein” was a huge tract of land stretching between the old Faure-Cape Town Road and the sea from Faure to Cape Town. Albie sold “Dynefontein” at some stage for “2 and 6” (1/4 of a British Pound = 12.5 cents in today’s money) per morgen (slightly under a hectare) (told to me by father JPMF). He sold “Bleak House” to a Mr BOSMAN in 1920 and purchased “Kahlenberg” farm from a Mr KOEFNER / KUFFNER in the same year. Mr KOEFNER / KUFFNER was an Austrian citizen and had named the farm after a city (or town) in Austria. He also had other properties, including (he thought) the plot on which the Da Gama Hotel (Beach Road, Strand) was built (now the Da Gama block of flats). The attorney never transferred the plot to him (but kept the money of course). According to father JPMF he also owned a share in the White House Hotel in the Strand, but when the company that owned it went out of business all PABF got out of the deal was the fountain (still to be seen in front of the block of flats “Welgelegen” that replaced the White House Hotel, Beach Road, Strand). PABF also owned an aeroplane, which was used for “flips” by the public. The airstrip used was probably where “Aerodrome Road” is situated in Strand.
The home: In 1995 I asked Aunt Helen [Helena Elizabeth Morkel FAURE (1915-2005)] to write a piece on PABF and Dolly. She kindly obliged: It is a tribute to a kind (and a “legpuller” of note, but impatient) father and a kind and loving mother, who created a “very happy home”. It is presented in Book 8. Death: PABF was in a sick bed for a few years before he departed for Heaven. While ill he resigned as a Senator (probably in the period 1945-1947). He was visited by many friends and prominent persons, including Prime Minister General Jan SMUTS. Father JPMF informed me of an incident when Prime Minister Jan SMUTS paid a visit PABF at “Kahlenberg” while he was unwell. The backdrop: In Faure there lived a man by name Joe NORBE who looked very much like Prime Minister General Jan SMUTS; he was the owner of the local store. The house at “Kahlenberg” faced west. The incident: It was late afternoon, and there was a knock at the front door. JPMF opened the door and there stood a man silhouetted against the glare of the sun. JPMF thought it was Joe NORBE.
Not wanting his dad disturbed by Joe, JPMF said gruffly, “My pa wil nie vir jou sien nie” (my father does not want to see you). Jan SMUTS was taken aback, brushed JPMF aside, and walked into the house. JPMF later had occasion to explain and apologise to the Prime Minister. General SMUTS probably chuckled and accepted the apology.
Other information: JPMF told me that PABF accompanied Cecil John RHODES on horseback to identify the land at Strand, Cape, on which African Explosives and Chemical Industries (AECI) was later built. The explosives factory played a major role in mining (and later in plastic product manufacturing).
This is confirmed in “Memories of Helen FAURE” by Helena Elizabeth Morkel (1915-2005), as an entry in a PABF diary of 1929 or 1930. HEMF also told me that PABF went horse buying with CJR. PABF probably met CJR at “Highstead” while at high school in Cape Town. Reminder: Sir Pieter Hendrik FAURE was given the CJR homestead “Highstead” for use in his life and was a good friend of CJR and a member of his government. According to HEMF, CJR at one time presented Albie with a horse as a gift (why is not known).
Sense of humour: Albie, according to family lore, was a legpuller of note. One story stuck (artistic licence taken): Albie and three school friends decided to do some gallivanting in Cape Town. The foursome comprised Albie, Fred, Ivan, and Michael. Albie bought the tickets from their pooled money at the Faure railway station, and they duly departed on an adventure to the big city. They chatted about rugby and girls and peered out the window at the vineyards and stations flashing by every so often. Ten minutes into the journey the conductor entered the carriage at the far end from where the four were seated. Albie fumbled for the tickets and, with fanfare, pulled three out of his pocket, and fanned them out in his hand. He produced a pained expression. ‘My goodness, I've only got three tickets.’
‘I saw you buy four,’ Fred asserted. ‘What happened to the fourth?’
‘I must have lost it. Now we’re in trouble. The conductor's almost here.’ Albie looked Fred in the eye. ‘Fred, you're the smallest. Creep in under the seat and we'll be okay.’
Fred protested. ‘Why me? And it's filthy under the seat.’
‘Because you’re the smallest. Fred, hurry up, the conductor’s almost here. Get under the seat, please.’
With a groan Fred did as instructed, rubbing his clean white shirt into the thin layer of grubby soot. He mumbled anti-social words.
The conductor duly arrived. ‘Tickets please.’
Albie fumbled in his pocket, extracted four tickets, and handed them to the conductor.
The conductor looked at Albie askew. ‘But, you've given me four tickets. And there are only three of you.’
Albie asked the conductor to bend down and pointed to where Fred was lying under the seat. ‘The fourth ticket is for that fellow lying under the seat.’
The conductor was dumbfounded, and Fred was devastated.
With the exception of Fred, the friends laughed until their stomachs ached and their eyes brimmed with tears. They thanked Fred for the splendid entertainment.
Children: Albie and Dolly had 5 children.


Helen Elizabeth Morkel BECKER (nee FAURE) (1915-2005) (written 1990)
During the Boer War (1899-1902) my father was with the Civil Imperial Volunteers. He acted as interpreter and his job was to buy horses for the British Army. He was often away. Cecil Rhodes was a friend of the family and often came to “Vergenoegd”. In my
father’s diary he wrote in 1899 – “I accompanied Mr. Rhodes on horseback today to buy ground for De Beers at Somerset West. “After the Boer War my father bought all the silver cutlery from the Officer’s Mess of the Civil Imperial Volunteers. He had the “C.I.V.” stamped out and “F” engraved over it. I have a cruet stand marked “OMWLH” (Officer’s Mess, Western Light Horse).
Attachments:
The following user(s) said Thank You: djb, QSAMIKE, jim51

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Medals to the CIV 2 years 8 months ago #56654

  • Henk Loots
  • Henk Loots's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 755
  • Thank you received: 367
Hi Adrian
I never realised when I disposed of the Faure QSA 2 years ago that there was a wealth of most interesting data and a photo to be re-united with the medal!!
Hope the KSA surfaces.
Henk
The following user(s) said Thank You: Adrian123456

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Medals to the CIV 2 years 8 months ago #56667

  • Adrian123456
  • Adrian123456's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 227
  • Thank you received: 101
Hi

Colonel the Hon. Charles Frampton Stallard QC, DSO and MC (4 June 1871 – 13 June 1971) was a South African lawyer, soldier and politician.
Medals:

DSO
MC
QSA
WW1 Trio
Efficiency Decoration
Coronation Medals 1937 and 1953
MID 3 Times
Born in London, Stallard attended Merton College, Oxford, graduating in 1893. He was called to the English Bar by Gray's Inn in 1895. He subsequently went to South Africa and fought in the Second Boer War, serving with the City Imperial Volunteers and Paget's Horse. After the war he became an advocate in Johannesburg, from 1902; he was made King's Counsel in 1910.
During the First World War, he served on the staff of General Louis Botha in South West Africa (in 1914-15) and later in Flanders - where he was wounded - and Italy. Stallard was thrice mentioned in dispatches and was awarded the DSO and MC.
Stallard's political career included being a member of the Transvaal Provincial Council in 1910. He was the Member of Parliament (MP) for Roodepoort 1929-38 and Maritzburg District 1939-1948 when he retired. He was a member of the South African Party until 1934, when he declined to support the fusion with the National Party to form the United Party.
Stallard was the leader of the Dominion Party from 1933 until 1948. During the Second World War he was Minister of Mines in the cabinet of Jan Smuts.
Between 1937 and 1971 Stallard was Honorary Colonel of the Witwatersrand Rifles Regiment. He died on 13 June 1971, nine days after his 100th birthday.


T./Maj. Charles Frampton Stallard, M.C., 23rd Bn., Mdx. 'R., attd. 15th Bn., Hamps. R. For marked gallantry and leadership during operations east of Courtrai from 20th/ 26th October, 1918. whilst temporarily commanding a battalion. When the whole battalion, was held up on the canal bank at Knokke on the 21st October by direct and enfilade machine-gun fire from the opposite bank, he personally went forward and reorganised the position, and led his battalion across the canal. After reforming the 'battalion, on the other side of the canal he led the advance up the slope and established a commanding position. Throughout the operations he did excellent work.
MID France 15 May 1917 LG 4752
MID Italy 30 May 1918 LG 6334
MID France 9 July 1919 LG 8702

Regards

Adrian
Attachments:
The following user(s) said Thank You: djb, Brett Hendey

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Medals to the CIV 2 years 8 months ago #56675

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Away
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 24139
  • Thank you received: 1836
Thank you for that information, Adrian. Do you know how his QSA is named?
Dr David Biggins

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Moderators: djb
Time to create page: 1.147 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum