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Medals to the CIV 2 weeks 7 hours ago #70877

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QSA (4) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill (566 Pte. C. J. Brymer, C.I.V.);
Special Constabulary Long Service Medal, GV (1) The Great War 1914-18 (Coy. Cmdr. Cecil J. Brymer);

Together with the recipient’s related miniature awards, four medals given to the recipient by the Ancient and Honourable Company of Boston dating from the HAC visit to Boston in 1903; and a City of London Police Reserve lapel badge, gilt and enamel

Cecil John Brymer was born in West Ham, London on 14 December 1872. At the time of his death in 1933 the following was written about his life:

‘Mr Cecil John Brymer, who died at Ikona, Furze Hill, Purley, on Saturday in his 61st year, was educated at Merchant Taylors’ School. He became a member of the London Stock Exchange in 1902 and for many years was a partner in the firm of A. Walter Ramsay & Co. As a member of the H.A.C. [since 1893] he served with the City Imperial Volunteers [Infantry Battalion] in the South African War and on his return was given the Freedom of the City of London. During the Great War he served in the City of London Police Reserve, in which he was an inspector. A member of the Skinners’ Company since 1901, he became Master in 1931. He was a member of the governing bodies of Tonbridge School and of the Northampton Polytechnic Institute, and a governor of the Corporation of the Sons of the Clergy. He was also twice Master of the Pellipar Lodge of Freemasons.’ (Sunday Mirror 31 March 1933).
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the CIV 2 weeks 7 hours ago #70878

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QSA (3) Cape Colony, Transvaal, Wittebergen (1342 Gnr: W. F. Palles. C.I.V.); 1914-15 Star (55 Sd. S. Sjt W. F. Palles. H.A.C. (Inf.)) minor official correction to first letter of rank;
British War and Victory Medals (2. Lieut. W. F. Palles);
Territorial Force Efficiency Medal, GVR (55 Sd. Sjt: W. F. Palles. H.A.C.) on H.A.C. riband,

William Francis Palles was born in Wardour, Wiltshire in 1866. He joined the Honourable Artillery Company on 10 October 1898 and served in the B Sub-division of the City Imperial Volunteers Battery in South Africa during the Boer War.

He lived in Wimbledon, working as a manager for a Court Dressmaker before serving again with the HAC (Artillery Section) during the Great War in the Egypt and Palestine theatres from 21 April 1915 in the rank of Sadler Staff Sergeant. He was promoted to Battery Quarter Master Sergeant before being commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Royal Army Service Corps on 27 March 1918.

He died in Surrey in 1934.

Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the CIV 1 week 6 days ago #70896

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QSA (4) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill (279 Pte. F. M. Hopkins, C.I.V.);
Imperial Yeomanry LS&GC ED VII (230 Pte. F. Hopkins. The King’s Colonials I.Y.);
British War and Victory Medals (64875. 1.A.M. F. M. Hopkins. R.A.F.)

Frank Mitchell Hopkins was born in Hanwell, Middlesex on 21 December 1879. Employed from 4 December 1894 as a Solicitor’s Clerk at Paddington Station in the service of the Great Western Railway Company, a note against his name in the Railway Employment Records states: ‘Volunteered for South Africa. Absent on leave from 1 Jan 00 to 2nd Decbr.’

Having earlier joined the 2nd Volunteer Battalion, Middlesex Regiment in 1895, he served in South Africa with “A” Company, Infantry Battalion, City Imperial Volunteers during the Boer War, marching the full 1,218 miles covered by the regiment during the war.

As the only representative from Hanwell to serve with the City of London Imperial Volunteers, extracts from three letters to his relatives were published in the Ealing Gazette and West Middlesex Observer on 19 May 1900, including the following from Norvals Point on 5 April 1900:

‘We had some heavy fighting near Britstown on March 6th and the sights I saw that day I shall never forget. Corporal Selfe, of Brentford, who is in charge of our tent, was wounded. Our doctor was attending to a wounded man and Selfe was assisting. All three were shot, the poor fellow receiving a second bullet in the back. Selfe was discharged from hospital in three weeks. Color-Sergeant Taylor (also of our local regiment) was badly wounded in the thigh. The reason I have not written lately is that I have felt too unwell. The attack of sunstroke which I had about three weeks ago has proved to be more troublesome than I anticipated but I am glad to say my usual health is gradually returning. By the Bye

I am delighted to say that I am back in my Company, and no longer wear the Red Cross. I was never cut out for a nurse, and am much more handy with my rifle than I am with a linseed poultice.’

Hopkins later served with the 4th County of London (King’s Colonials) Imperial Yeomanry and was awarded one of just four Imperial Yeomanry Long Service Medals issued to this unit (Army Order 1905).

Enlisting in the Royal Flying Corps as an Air Mechanic 2nd Class on 9 March 1917, Hopkins served during the Great War on the Western Front with them and their successor, the Royal Air Force, from 4 April 1917 until 8 March 1919. Promoted Air Mechanic 1st Class on 1 January 1918, he was discharged on 20 April 1920, and died at Boscombe, Bournemouth in 1942.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the CIV 1 week 6 days ago #70897

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Medals to the Fisher family


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QSA (4) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Diamond Hill, South Africa 1901, top clasp loose on riband (6543 Pte. W. Fisher, 27th Coy. 7th Imp: Yeo:);

QSA (6) Cape Colony, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Wittebergen (185 Pte. G. E. Fisher, C.I.V.);

QSA (7) Cape Colony, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Wittebergen, Belfast (179 Pte. T. Fisher, C.I.V.)

William Fisher was born at Tawstock, Devon on 12 September 1864. He served in South Africa with the 27th (Devonshire) Company, 7th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry during the Boer War, dying of enteric fever at Johannesburg on 17 March 1901. The following article relating to him and his brothers appeared in the North Devon Journal on 28 March 1901:

‘Trooper William Fisher, the Imperial Yeoman whose death at Johannesburg on March 14th was announced in Saturday’s papers, was the eldest son of Mr. Thomas Fisher, of Anchor Wood, Barnstaple, and formerly of Tawstock. Deceased was one of the first to join the Imperial Yeomanry at Barnstaple about eighteen months ago, and he had taken part in a number of engagements in South Africa. He went through without mishap until his last fight about three months ago, when with others he was captured, but subsequently released by the Boers, who, however, retained all his belongings of the value of about £15. Trooper Fisher was a Corporal in the Royal North Devon Hussars for eight years, and he had a host of friends in North Devon, by whom his death is greatly deplored. Mr. and Mrs. Fisher have two other sons who saw active service in the C.I.V.s (Privates Thomas and George Fisher, who returned safely to England, George, however, being for some time laid up in Netley Hospital with enteric fever), whilst a fourth son, Albert Fisher, who recently joined from Ilfracombe, is at present on his way to South Africa, for service in the Imperial Yeomanry. General sympathy is expressed for Mr. and Mrs. Fisher in their present bereavement, with the sincere hope that the son who has recently volunteered to fight in his country’s cause may be spared to safely return to them.’

George Ernest Fisher was born at Tawstock, Devon on 26 May 1876. Like his elder brother, he was a draper by occupation, joined the 5th (West Middlesex) Rifle Volunteers in 1892 and served in South Africa with No. 2 Mounted Infantry Company, City Imperial Volunteers during the Boer War. As noted by the North Devon Journal, he suffered from enteric fever and was hospitalised for some time upon his return from South Africa. Following the outbreak of the Great War, he served as a private (No. 1832) with the Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars in the Egyptian Theatre of War from 21 April 1915, and was killed in action at Gallipoli on 28 August 1915.

Thomas Fisher was born at Tawstock, Devon on 2 July 1866. A draper by occupation, like his brothers, he too joined the 5th (West Middlesex) Rifle Volunteers on 8 March 1892 and served in South Africa with No. 2 Mounted Infantry Company, City Imperial Volunteers during the Boer War, receiving a seven clasp Q.S.A. medal (one of 3 officers and 19 other ranks to do so, all of whom were in No 2 Company, Mounted Infantry, the only unit of the C.I.V. at Belfast). He died at Barnstaple, Devon, on 3 July 1904.

Albert Fisher, a fourth brother, was born in 1874, and served in South Africa with the 27th (Devonshire) Company, 7th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry during the Boer War, dying of enteric fever at Heilbron on 26 February 1902.

A fifth brother, Henry, was born in 1869 and died 1950.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the CIV 1 week 5 days ago #70922

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QSA (4) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill (781 Pte. C. E. Brown, CIV);
Coronation 1902, Metropolitan Police, bronze (P.C., C. Brown. N. Div.);
Coronation 1911, Metropolitan Police (P.C., C. Brown.)

Charles Ernest Brown was born at Surbiton, Surrey on 14 August 1878, the son of Alfred and Sarah Brown. He enlisted into the 3rd Volunteer Battalion, East Surrey Regiment on 16 November 1896 and served with their detachment in South Africa during the Boer War in the Infantry Battalion of the City Imperial Volunteers.

Brown joined the Metropolitan Police Force on 23 September 1901. Initially in N (Islington) Division, he served for 26 years, resigning on 26 September 1927 aged 49 years.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the CIV 1 week 3 days ago #70952

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The City of London Imperial Volunteers for South Africa 1899-1900 Medallion, 76mm, bronze, the obverse featuring a seated female figure with sword, presenting the freedom of the city to a uniformed man in the City Imperial Volunteers, the reverse featuring the radiant sun of the British Empire shining behind a hill which is surmounted by a tall staff flying the Union Flag and CIV Flag, guarded by two guns.

The edge is usually inscribed in large capitals and the medallion is sometimes in its fitted and embossed case of issue.




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Dr David Biggins
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