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An Imperial Light Horseman at Elandslaagte and Ladysmith 2 years 3 months ago #59746

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Henry Adey

Corporal, 7th Hussars – Matabele Rebellion
Sergeant, Imperial Light Horse – Anglo Boer War


- British South Africa Company Medal with Mashonaland 1897 clasp to 3453 Corl. H. Adey, 7: Hussars
- Queen's South Africa Medal with Elandslaagte and Defence of Ladysmith clasps to 204 Tpr. H. Adey, Imp. Lt. Horse.


Henry Adey’s story starts in 1867 when Alexander Adey, a Labourer (Woodsman) married Eliza Clinkaberry in Kingsclere in Hampshire setting in motion a change of events leading to the birth of their son Henry Adey. Henry was born in the Parish of East Woodhay near the Town of Newbury in the County of Berkshire in January 1871.

Three months later, according to the 1871 England census Alexander, aged 37 and Eliza, aged 30, Adey were living at 12 Oak Hurst in the Parish of East Woodhay. Henry was aged 3 months and had an elder brother, Frederick, aged 3 years. On 9 September 1878, at the age of 7, Adey was enrolled into the Church of England School in East Woodhay. His residence was provided as “Burley Moor” and mention was made that his previous school had been “North End”. His education, such as it was in those days, terminated in July 1882 when, at the age of 11, he was, according to the entry in the school register, “Gone to work” having “Passed 4th Standard”. Evidently this was deemed enough to equip him for later life.

The 1881 England census had come round whilst he was still at school and confirmed the fact that the family were resident at "The Moor", East Woodhay. Henry, then aged 10, was joined by elder brother Frederick as well as two additional siblings, Charles Herbert aged 8 and Alice aged 4.



Adey and his wife and large brood of children

Having completed his rudimentary education Adey, like most young boys or men of the “chattering classes”, had limited options open to them. Most would follow in their respective fathers’ footsteps – taking up the trade from which they eked out a living. Others would seek a career in the bosom of what made the Empire almost indestructible – the Army – and it was to this body that, on 25 February 1890 Adey, aged 19 ½ years, applied himself attesting at Canterbury for the 7th Hussars and commencing a military adventure which would take him to far away Africa in the service of the Crown.

The attestation papers he completed confirmed that he was a Gardener by occupation and that he was, physically, 5 feet 9 inches in height, weighed 152 pounds and had a fair complexion, blue eyes and light brown hair. By way of distinguishing features he had a “long scar over his nose and inside left eyebrow and one on the index finger of his left hand.” Quite how he had become so “scarred” was not revealed. Having been passed as Fit for the Army by the Doctor he was assigned no. 3453 and the rank of Trooper.

A year later, and at the time of the 1891 census, Adey was, together with brother Charles Herbert, a Private in the Barracks of the 7th Hussars in St. Mary Northgate in the County of Kent. Not long after, on 3 September 1891 he sailed for India with his regiment where on arrival he was initially stationed at Secunderabad before moving to Mhow the following month.

The regiment were ordered to sail to Natal in October 1895, and having handed over their horses to the 20th Hussars, set sail for South Africa. In Natal from 23 October 1895, they inherited the horses of the 3rd Dragoon Guards and went by train to Pietermaritzburg where, on arrival, they assumed their duties. This was a routine posting but while there trouble flared up in Matabeleland - so 9 months after their arrival 3 squadrons, under the command of Lt-Col Harold Paget, had to go to Mafeking where troops were being assembled. This involved a return to Durban where they embarked on the 'Goth' bound for East London further down the coast, from there they could travel by train.

Trouble had, in the meanwhile, been brewing on the northern borders of South Africa with the Matabele tribe of Rhodesia. Miffed by the continued (and growing) presence of the white settlers who were making themselves at home in what was deemed to be tribal territory they took up arms and, in an unprecedented move, took to slaying a number of European settlers living in isolated and out of the way places.

The authorities, no longer prepared to countenance what was assuming the proportions of open rebellion, raised a number of local units to quell the rebellion as well as sending what troops they could from South Africa. The 7th Hussars, already in the vicinity of the troubles, were included in the small Imperial force being sent to Rhodesia.

Throughout 1896 the regiment operated in the area of Gwelo in the middle of Southern Rhodesia, patrolling regularly alongside Mounted Infantry made up with men from the 2nd Yorks and Lancs. The column was usually commanded by Colonel Baden-Powell. They rarely found any large groups of the Matabele warriors who had caused the trouble, and their main task was to seize stocks of grain and any cows and goats they could find to starve the warriors into submission. Kraals and stores of arms and ammunition were destroyed. On September 18th, however, a patrol of 12 men under Baden-Powell captured a woman who told them the whereabouts of a group from M'tini's Impi. A boy offered to lead them and they surprised the group in their kraal and surrounded them with drawn swords. In the middle of October a battle was fought to capture Chief Wedza which lasted 4 days.

In November 1896 A and D squadrons marched to Bulawayo where a camp had been prepared for them. In 1897 D Squadron was sent north of Bulawayo, commanded by Major Ridley, to raid the stronghold of Chief Matzwetzwe. They attacked at dawn on 12th July but it proved too difficult so they laid siege until the warriors surrendered. On 24th July B and A Squadrons joined in an attack on the stronghold of Mashigombi. The enemy were in fortified caves which had to be dynamited. It took 3 days to defeat them.

There is no better a source to quote what was transpiring on the ground than Baden-Powell himself. In his book “The Matabele Campaign 1896” he states, on page 118 that:-

“28 October – I started off with Carew, 7th Hussars, and a party of ten men, and my orderly Parkyn, to call on Monogula. We went by moonlight, so that he would not be alarmed at our numbers. On arriving at the stronghold soon after daylight, the escort hid in the bush, and leaving our rifles with them, Parkyn and I rode out into the open in front of the kraal, and waving a towel as a flag of truce, we told the rebels we were men of peace come to talk with them – that the men of war were not far behind us and would be there before another sun rose, unless they (the rebels) came to talk over the situation.

The great White Queen was getting a little vexed with Monogula, all the other chiefs of note had surrendered or been licked except him: if he did not take this chance of surrendering , he would be knocked out and his lands given to another.

Most eloquent we were but all in vain! Our shouts only raised up birds from their feeds of split grain in the kraal. There was no reply, nor was there any fresh spoor on the many paths. We went closer and closer up on the rocks – nobody fired at us – they were not there!

We had a good look around, and then returned to report to Colonel Paget, who had meanwhile moved up the laager to within three miles of the place. When blazing midday sun was over, the men and the 7 pounder were moved out to the stronghold. The gun fired half a dozen shells into the place, and the 7th Hussars then advanced along the ridge into the kraal, while I came up from below with the Mounted Infantry. Suddenly there was an outburst of firing in the kraal above – I knew it was the 7th Hussars firing into it as a precautionary measure.

A few weeks ago there had been a different tale to tell. A patrol of 7th Hussars under Captain Carew had then got up to the wall which defended the main kraal. One man was shot dead close to the wall, when his companion without a second’s pause, mounted the wall and pistoled the firer of the shot.

In South Africa of Today, Francis Younghusband wrote,

"The 7th Hussars were handicapped for many reasons, the chief of which was their arrival upon the scene of action when the enemy had retired into their rocky kopjes and when, in consequence, the time for useful action by cavalry had passed. They only on one or two occasions had the opportunity of using their swords effectually, but they were able to establish a reputation for efficiency in rifle practise which few expected cavalry soldiers to possess."

Once the Matabeles had been taken care of it was the turn of the Mashonas, normally a more placid people, they had been spurred on by the efforts of their Matabele counterparts. The local white population were unhappy that the government had not taken measures to prevent the stealing of cattle by the Mashona people and so the patrols of Hussars and Mounted Infantry were sent out to deal with the culprits.

On 7th July 1897 Major Ridley's column attacked M'guilse where a trooper was killed and Ridley was wounded in the leg. And on 14th July a detachment under Captain Poore killed 40 rebels at Umtzewa's kraal near Fort Charter without any casualties of their own. On 24th July the 3 squadrons of the 7th met up with a column of police and Vryburg Volunteers to attack Mashingombi's stronghold. He was the main leader of the Mashona rebellion. The British/Rhodesian force was commanded by Sir Richard Martin and the 7th Hussars were commanded by Captains Carew and Poore. The attack started at dawn and the Mashonas were soon scattered. They took refuge in the many caves that pitted the surrounding hills and caused trouble on the following days and nights firing down on the troops. Mashingombi himself was killed along with many others and 400 prisoners were taken.

Casualties among the Hussars were few although Private Dands was reported killed. Captain Carew led a further attack on Marlie's kraal capturing another 100 prisoners. He then split the 7th into 2 columns to move down the river Unfuli to Fort Charter. Patrols continued to be sent out but the remaining chiefs had all surrendered by the end of September. The 7th were ordered to embark at Beira on 20th Oct with Major Ridley back in command. The conduct of the regiment was reported as being of a very high standard.

For his efforts Adey was awarded the British South Africa Company Medal (Rhodesia 1896) with Mashonaland 1897 clasp. According to the medal roll dated 23 December 1897, the medals was sent to the “Borough Police, Maritzburg”.

Adey elected to stay in South Africa - according to Army Form B.2077, the Parchment Certificate of Character on discharge completed in respect of Adey on 18 December 1897, his Conduct and Character with the Colours was rated as Good. The Parchment was signed at Pietermaritzburg by Lieut. Col. H. Paget, O.C. 7th (Q.O.) Hussars.

Army Form D.426 – Parchment Reserve Certificate of No. 3453, completed in respect of Adey on the same day, has him transferred to the Army Reserve in consequence of the termination of his first period of engagement. He was credited with 7 years and 297 days service towards completion of limited engagement with service abroad totalling 6 years and 107 days. He was recommended for the “Matabeleland War Medal and 2nd Class certificate”.

Being placed on the Army Reserve didn’t put paid to Adey’s military endeavours. With the war clouds looming between the two Dutch speaking Republics and Great Britain, Adey enrolled for service with the Imperial Light Horse (Natal) on 23rd September 1899. His attestation papers confirmed his prior service with the 7th Hussars and that he was now 28 years old, 5 feet 10 inches in height and had a fair complexion, blue eyes and fair hair. He also weighed in at 168 pounds.

From the outset the strength of the first regiment was 502. From the appendices to the War Commission Report we learn that on 13th October 1899, the day after the declaration of war, the ILH, numbered about 350, but actually rather stronger, were stationed at Maritzburg; they were, however, taken to the front within the next few days, and were at once put to a severe test. The Boers had not declared war until their forces were concentrated for the invasion of Natal, and before many days they had crossed the passes, and had begun to overrun the northern and western parts of the colony.

The first major engagement the ILH participated in was the battle of Elandslaagte, which was fought on 21st October. Major-General French was ordered to move out from Ladysmith at 4 am with five squadrons of the ILH and the Natal Field Battery, followed at 6 am by a half battalion 1st Manchester Regiment and telegraph companies by rail. The enemy were found, and one squadron of the ILH, under Major Woolls - Sampson, moved to the north of them, and the battery opened fire, but the enemy replied with artillery and disclosed his position, which was found too strong. Reinforcements were wired for, and arrived in the early afternoon.

As the reinforcements gradually reached him, Major-General French pushed forward again, throwing out one squadron of the 5th Lancers and four squadrons ILH, under Colonel Chisholme, to the right, to clear a ridge of high ground parallel to the enemy's position, from which he considered that an attack could best be developed. This movement was well carried out, the enemy's advance troops being driven back and the ridge gained.

The Manchesters and Gordons, with the ILH on their right, continued to press forward, losing few men, until a point was reached about 1200 yards from the enemy's camp. Here the ridge became bare of cover, but the men, well led, crossed the neck in brilliant style, although the losses were heavy. After the enemy's guns were reached a white flag was shown, but when the British stood up the enemy's fire broke out again, and the attack had to be renewed. The Boers now fled in confusion. The ILH and the 2nd Gordon Highlanders, who encountered the severest resistance during the progress of the attack, suffered the most severely.

It was no small compliment to the ILH that they had been chosen as the reconnoitring force at this the first engagement of Sir George White and General French.

On the 24 October 1899 the ILH, along with the 5th Lancers, did good service in the action in seizing the ridges south of the Modder Spruit, and they thus protected Sir George's right flank during the retirement on Ladysmith.

On 30 October 1899 at Lombard's Kop the regiment was again engaged, this time chiefly in the centre under Colonel Ian Hamilton. In this action Sir George White found that he was not strong enough to drive back the enemy, and the result was that his troops were surrounded in Ladysmith. During the siege of Ladysmith Adey and his regiment had very frequently a prominent part to play. The Siege was to last four months to the day and impose upon all those present unimaginable hardships and privations.

One of the legendary actions in which the Imperial Light Horse was involved was the Lancer's Nek action which is mentioned in several accounts of the conflict, among others Amery V.3, Maurice V. 2, and "The Story of the Imperial Light Horse" by Lt. Gibson. Combined with these was the quite useful official after-action report by Brigadier General Brocklehurst (to be found in "The 18th Hussars in South Africa" by Maj. Burnett). Lancer's Nek caused an immediate and beneficial change of leadership in the ILH.

The situation in Ladysmith at the commencement of November 1899 was grim, despite the victory at Elandslaagte, the aforementioned operations had far from improved the British situation and, by the 2nd, the town was under full-scale bombardment. The investment, however, was not thought to be complete. That same day, under the command of Brig. Gen. Brocklehurst, the defenders made a small scale probe to the West of the town with scant results. The next day, they were to try again towards the South West with an entire cavalry brigade supported by artillery.

What followed on the morning of the 3rd November was described as a "reconnaissance"; a reaction to a patrol report of enemy movement. Operating over "good cavalry country", it seems likely that Brocklehurst's brigade was strong enough to exploit any opportunity offered. Having no infantry component, his force would not have been able to take and hold ground. However, mobility and direct artillery support might allow the force to inflict a check on the activities of the besiegers.

Accounts differ as to the sequence of events; however Gibson says two ILH squadrons under the temporary command of Major Karri Davies were thrown out early in the morning and well ahead of the main force. They were to draw whatever the enemy fire there was and fix his position. The enemy was located with at least one gun on Lancer's Hill (thus being able to dominate any activity in Long Valley and on the Colenso and Oliver's Hoek roads) and by 11h15, the 5th Dragoon Guards, 18th and 19th Hussars and 21st Field Battery, Royal Artillery were positioned to support the ILH and exploit any enemy weakness.

By 12h15, however, things began to unravel. Upon drawing enemy fire from Lancer's Hill and seeing what he thought was an enemy retirement, Major Karri Davies had dismounted his men, saying "Boys, load your guns". "You see that kopje, that's the Boer laager, we're going to take it". "Right squadron, go on. Left squadron in support". Lt. Gibson fleshed out what followed by extensively quoting the military correspondent of the London Daily Mail; G.W.Steevens.

Steevens wrote that "the incident rose out of the prodigal valour of the ILH". They had lost their Colonel (late of the 5th Lancers) at Elandslaagte, he wrote, and General Brocklehurst, the new cavalry Brigadier, had incautiously given their new civilian C.O. a free hand. "I've heard your men are very fine fellows, Major, do what you like". Steevens regarded Major Karri Davies as "no soldier" and commented that the hill was occupied by "at least eight hundred Boers". Steevens usefully identifies the leading ILH squadron attacking Lancer's Hill as "C" squadron.

The odds were stacked so heavily against success that fully half of "C" squadron refused to obey the order. Steevens says they "jibbed". Only thirty of the sixty-strong squadron responded -apparently led by Major Doveton - and they got to within 700 yards of the enemy before heavy fire and many casualties caused them to "shelter under ant hills" and could neither advance nor retire.

Extraction of the two squadrons was difficult. Seeing the rash advance, the Brigadier had his mounted units and artillery positioned for supporting fire and by 16h00 the ILH and the supporting elements were able to withdraw in extended order at no further cost - save dignity.

Seeing that he had stirred up a hornet's nest, the Brigadier ordered the force to retire to Ladysmith. Later, when Major Karri Davies was queried by one of his squadron commanders about the unsupported, headlong advance, he replied "Well, Jimmy, as the Regiment was formed to fight the Boers, I went for them". Steevens added: "The event of the day was the splendid madness of the Thirty Light Horsemen". He also commented that of the thirty ILH that actually advanced from the Nek and up Lancer's Hill, only twelve came down.

The losses aroused criticism of the "reckless manner" in which the ILH had conducted its part of the reconnaissance. Of Major Karri Davies, Brigadier Brocklehurst recorded that "the advance was most gallantly made, but being unsupported, it was an error of judgement, and I would not have sanctioned it had I been aware it was contemplated". The comment of Steevens that the retirement was "well covered" was tempered by this proviso to his readers "only now you must be tired of retirements".

The day after the withdrawal, Major A. H. M. Edwards of the 5th Dragoon Guards was summoned by Sir George White and offered the command of the ILH. Maj. Karri Davies did not demur; indeed he confessed to his successor that it would not be fair on the Regiment if he was retained. The loss of two valuable officers, Capt. Knapp and Lt. Brabant, as well as twelve ORs wounded and one missing in what could fairly be termed a fiasco - not to mention the "jibbing" incident and other casualties in the Natal Volunteers - all would have weighed heavily on the Commander in Chief.

That Adey was one of the "Thirty Light Horsemen" of Lancer's Nek is proved, undisputedly, by the specific mention, on his parchment paper, of his presence in the action at “Long Valley”. Fortunately Adey was one of the unwounded survivors.

But the Siege wore on - on 7 November 1899 Caesar's Camp was subjected to heavy artillery and long-range rifle fire, and the ILH with the 42nd Battery were sent to reinforce the point attacked. Seven days later on 14 November 1899 the regiment with the Natal Mounted Volunteers, two cavalry regiments, and two batteries, were sent across the Klip River to work round Rifleman's Ridge. The regiment and the Natal Volunteers seized Star Hill, but General Brocklehurst decided that the enemy's position was too strong, and retired his force.

During the evening of 7 December 1899 Major-General Sir A. Hunter, with 500 Natal Volunteers, which included 100 Border Mounted Rifles under Colonel Royston, and 100 ILH under Lieutenant Colonel A. H. M. Edwards, with a few guides, engineers, and artillerymen, made his famous sortie to capture and destroy the enemy's artillery on Gun Hill. Gun Hill was taken, a 6-inch creusot and a 4.7 howitzer were destroyed, and a maxim captured and brought into camp.

Before dawn on 6 January 1900 the Boers commenced their very determined, but fortunately unsuccessful, attempt to carry Ladysmith by storm. The attack was mainly developed on the southern defences, at Caesar's Camp and Wagon Hill. The usual garrison of Wagon Hill was composed of three companies 1st King's Royal Rifles and a squadron of the ILH including Adey. On the evening of the 5th a detachment of the Natal Naval Volunteers, with a 3-pounder Hotchkiss gun, had been sent to Wagon Hill. Two naval guns had also been taken to the foot of the hill, and some sailors, Royal Engineers, and men of the 2nd Gordons had accompanied the latter guns.

The attack commenced at 2.30 am. "It fell directly on the squadron of ILH, under Lieutenant G M Mathias, and the Volunteer Hotchkiss detachment, under Lieutenant E N W Walker, who clung most gallantly to their positions and did invaluable service in holding in check till daylight the Boers who had gained a footing on the hill, within a few yards of them. The extreme south-west point of the hill was similarly held by a small mixed party of bluejackets, Royal Engineers, Gordon Highlanders, and Imperial Light Horse, under Lieutenant Digby -Jones, RE. The remainder of the hill was defended by the companies of 1st Battalion King's Royal Rifles".

Never during the whole war did the Boers show finer courage. About mid-day the fighting slackened, but at 1 pm "a fresh assault was made with great suddenness on the extreme south-west of the hill, our men giving way for a moment before the sudden outburst of fire and retiring down the opposite slope. Fortunately the Boers did not immediately occupy the crest, and this gave time for Major Miller-Wallnutt of the Gordons, Lieutenant Digby-Jones, RE, Lieutenant Fitzgerald, ILH, Gunner Sims, Royal Navy, and several NCO's of the ILH, to rally the men. The top was reoccupied just as the three foremost Boers reached it.

At 4.45 pm, during a storm of wind and rain, the troops were again driven from the south-west point of the hill, but they were again rallied and reoccupied it. At 5 pm Lieutenant Colonel Park, with three companies of the 1st Battalion Devonshire Regiment, finally cleared the hill by a magnificent bayonet-charge. Sir George White added "I desire to draw special attention to the gallantry displayed by all ranks of the ILH, some of whom were within 100 yards of the enemy for 15 hours, exposed to a deadly fire. Their losses were terribly heavy, but never for one moment did any of them waver or cease to show a fine example of courage and determination to all who came in contact with them". Towards the close of his despatch Sir George, again, said: "Of the Imperial Light Horse, specially raised in Natal at the commencement of the war, I have already expressed my opinion. No praise can be too great for the gallantry and determination which all ranks of this corps have invariably displayed in action".

Down to the close of the siege the regiment bore its share of the work and the hardships, now, after 6th January, daily increasing.

On 28 February 1900 the Siege of Ladysmith came to an end when, at 6.20 p.m. a welcome sight greeted the eyes of the weary garrison, for suddenly out of the bush appeared two squadrons of mounted men, riding leisurely in across the plain from the direction of Intombi, and the truth dawned on the garrison that Ladysmith was at last and in reality relieved.

According to Adey’s Discharge Certificate from the Imperial Light Horse he was discharged after completing 186 days of service on 27 March 1900. His Character was regarded as “Indifferent”. That he was present at the major actions leading up to and during the Siege of Ladysmith is confirmed by the comments made on the reverse of the Certificate where Captain and Adjutant Barnes listed the following: Elandslaagte, Tinta Inyoni, Lombard’s Kop, Long Valley (already alluded to) and Wagon Hill.’

For his efforts Adey was awarded the Queen’s South Africa Medal with the Elandslaagte and Defence of Ladysmith clasps. He is reflected as No. 204 Sergeant Henry Adey on the roll.

Probably whilst on a spot of leave after enduring the rigours of the siege, Adey married Louisa Mary Kathleen Ferrers at the Wesleyan Church in Pietermaritzburg on May 3rd 1900. Rather interestingly his occupation was listed as that of a Blacksmith. His brother and fellow I.L.H. Trooper, Charles Henry Adey, was witness to the event.

On 28 November 1901 Army Form B.126, Parchment Certificate of Discharge was completed in respect of Private Adey, 7th Hussars. He was discharged in consequence of having been found medically unfit for further service. He had served a total of 11 years and 277 days of which 7 years 296 days were in the Army and 3 years 346 days in the Reserve. His discharge was confirmed at Newcastle, Natal by the D.A.G. Natal District.

Adey, having elected to remain in South Africa after discharge, turned his attention to civilian pursuits. He was next encountered aboard a Union Castle liner, the “Goorkha” docking in London from Cape Town on 25 June 1914. His occupation was given as a Clerk and he was 42 years of age. It is not known what the purpose of his visit was.

Henry Adey, spent many years as a Publican in Pietermaritzburg, Natal where he owned and ran the Market Inn at 291 Church Street.

On 12 September 1943 Adey signed his Last Will and Testament at Port Edward and, on 12 April 1944, he passed away, aged 73 years and 3 months at “Bardonella”, a house in the Port Edward area of the Port Shepstone District. His wife, Louisa Mary Adey had predeceased him on 4 August 1943.

He was survived by his many children, daughters Ellen May Wier – Mason, Olive Vivian Tanner, Violet Lily Steele, Grace Doris Isaacs, Ivy Mary Ferrers, Iris Alice Madalene Adey, Sylvia Esme Tabbers and sons Charles Herbert Adey, Walter Reginald Adey and Clifford Edward Adey and his beloved 1936 Pontiac sedan.










Thanks go to Linneyl for his article on the "30 Light Horsemen" as well as the official history of the ILH by Gibson in the compilation of this article
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An Imperial Light Horseman at Elandslaagte and Ladysmith 2 years 3 months ago #59750

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Wow! What a combination.
Dr David Biggins

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An Imperial Light Horseman at Elandslaagte and Ladysmith 2 years 3 months ago #59752

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Rory,

That's the second QSA you have listed recently with DoL followed by Elandslaagte. It is unusual for them to be in this order. How are the rivets on these two medals?
Dr David Biggins

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An Imperial Light Horseman at Elandslaagte and Ladysmith 2 years 3 months ago #59756

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It's the same chap David. I posted photos of his group under Linneyl's post on the Thirty Light Horsemen but had time to write-him up since.
His brother Charles Herbert Adey would have the same combination of meals but I have been unsuccessful in tracking them down.

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An Imperial Light Horseman at Elandslaagte and Ladysmith 2 years 3 months ago #59809

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I found this photo of Adey's squadron in Ladysmith in the official history by Gibson - I think Adey is the Sergeant in the front row third from the right.

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An Imperial Light Horseman at Elandslaagte and Ladysmith 1 month 3 days ago #71875

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Hi Rory, I want to say thank you so much for this information. I have been trying to find anything on Henry Adey for Ancestry for a long time. I am the great-grandaughter of Charles Herbert Adey. Charles came to Canada in 1910 and settled here. He died in 1973 aged 100. I was seventeen years old. Grandpa Charles never talked about the
war that I ever heard. I loved to spend time with him. I am also looking for any information on his time in South Africa. My family always had rumors of family in South Africa but we never knew who it was. I finally tracked down Henry Adey & spoke by email to his granddaughter, I believe. That was around 2011. I haven't been able to reach her again. Again thank you so much for all this wonderful information.
Vicki

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