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TOPIC: Walter Ware, St. John Ambulance Brigade - died 11.1.1923

Walter Ware, St. John Ambulance Brigade - died 11.1.1923 5 months 3 days ago #61771

  • BereniceUK
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A Derby man, he was In his late thirties when he saw service in South Africa, then receiving his war medal from the King, but later suffering a horrific accident at work.
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ST. JOHN AMBULANCE BRIGADE.

DERBY DIVISION.

WAR MEDALS PRESENTED TO DERBY MEN.
The Guild Hall, Derby, was crowded on Tuesday evening, when the medals won by Derby members of the St. John Ambulance Brigade for service in South Africa were publicly presented. The chair was taken by Mr. Francis Ley, J.P., and amongst those present were: Colonel McCleverty (commanding the 45th Regimental District), Surgeon Lieutenant-colonel Gentles, Colonel A. Buchanan, Major Monkhouse, Captain H. M. Haywood, Dr. Cassidi (hon. surgeon of the Derby Division), Mr. H. Gordon Ley, J.P. (superintendent of the division), Dr. Wilson, Dr. Moon, Dr. R. W. Gentles, Messrs. E. Jobson, H. Davies, J. E. T. Ducker, H. Davey, and others. A number of letters of apology for non-attendance were read. The Mayor, on account of a previously arranged engagement was unable to attend. Canon Hamilton, who is in London, wrote, mentioning the fact that his yeoman son, now in South Africa, said he had been admirably attended in the hospitals at Cape Town and Kroonstad, where he was nursed through some severe illnesses. Mr. Osborne, of the Midland Railway Carriage Works, also wrote expressing regret at his inability to be present.
The CHAIRMAN said their first duty was a very pleasant one, namely, to give a public welcome to those who did so much to alleviate the sufferings of our soldiers in South Africa. (Applause.) The men who were to receive medals that night were those who had given up their home comforts and gone thousands of miles away to endure severe hardships and perform difficult tasks for the sake of the sick and wounded on the field of battle. It was work which did not come before their notice in the papers like deeds of battle, but the ambulance men were quite as brave as those who shouldered their rifles and did the actual fighting. (Applause.) It said much for the devotion of Englishmen that so many were found willing to undertake such a noble calling, and it was also gratifying to know that there were many competent men able to assist the doctors in any time of great emergency. There were nearly 40 men of the Derby division, and that was a considerable number he thought. (Applause.) Alas! one or two exceptions had to be recorded for some men had fallen in doing their duty. They could only congratulate those men who had returned to their friends and sympathise with those who were left behind by those who had died whilst doing their noble duty.
Dr. CASSIDI followed with a statement concerning the work and present position of the Derby division. He said that the actual number of St. John Ambulance men who went out from Derby was thirty-six, and four of that number, namely, Messrs. Hill, Bradshaw, Commander, and Robinson, had gone out a second time, and were at present doing service at the front. He had received 32 medals from the War Office, but they could not all be presented that evening, as some of the men entitled to them were unavoidably absent. He proceeded to state that the St. John Ambulance Brigade had furnished no less than 2,000 men for ambulance work in South Africa. Of that number 62 had died from disease contracted while nursing the sick and wounded. Eight had been mentioned in despatches, and one had obtained the medal for distinguished service in the field. In conclusion, he said they proposed to distribute not only the war medals to the remaining men that night, but also to present the certificates to those men who had passed the examination at the conclusion of their course of lectures. Mr.Ley had announced his intention to present all ladies who gained their "badges" with gold brooches. Those brooches would also be distributed. Dr. Cassidi also mentioned that their third officer (Mr. Ware) would not receive his war medal that night, as he had been chosen to receive one from the hands of the King. (Cheers.) Fifty-eight men had passed the examination in first aid during the past year, and 32 had gained their certificate for the course of lectures.
Col. McCLEVERTY then proceeded to distribute the war medals, the following being a list of those entitled to them: - 2nd Officer A. G. Wright, 4th Officer W. Ware, Sergeant S. pope, Sergeant E. Hill, Privates R. Anthony, W. Bagley, A. Bradshaw, B. Brooks, W. Coggan, J. Coltman, A. Cullen, J. Chapman, W. Commander, J. Emery, T. Fellows, T. Freeman, H. Gale, J. Green, W. Grewcock, R. Griffith, J. Hadley, W. Hudson, F. Hydes, E. Jackson, W. Jay, A. Nightingale, E. Pearman, C. Redfern, A. Reynolds, A. Robinson, C. Rogers, J. Sims, S. Taylor, W. Walker, R. Woolner, and A. Yardley. Certificates of proficiency were presented to the following: Enoch Bannister, Joseph Bennett, Harold Barks, Leonard Barks, William Burke, Louis Butcher, Thomas Crispin, Frederick Endsor, George Endsor, Frederick Evans, Thomas Fitzhugh, Albert Flux, Robert Griffiths, Joseph Hallam, Walter Hewitt, John Holmes, George Hooper, Charles Layzell, Tom Mawbey, John Murray, George Newton, Joseph Nicholls, Ernest Pearman, Elias Russell, Edmund Rushton, Richard Simpson, George Smedley, Lawrence Sullivan, Frederick Wapling, Walter Ware, John Orme, Joseph Thompson, W. Bagley, T. Freeman, W. Grewcock, J. Hadley, E. Jackson, C. Redfern, A. Reynolds, A. Robinson, and C. Rogers...…………

Derby Daily Telegraph, Wednesday 29th January 1902
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Fourth Officer Ware, of the Derby Division, was one of 35 representatives of the Brigade who received their medals for service in South Africa from his Majesty at Buckingham Palace on Saturday last
Derby Daily Telegraph, Monday 2nd June 1902
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SHOCKING ACCIDENT AT A DERBY LACE FACTORY.
A serious accident happened this (Thursday) morning to a fitter, Walter Ware, in the employ of Mr. William Fletcher, lace manufacturer, at Chaddesden Works, Nottingham-road, Derby. He was repairing a belt, when his hand became fast, and was dragged round. The arm was literally torn off at the elbow, and was left hanging on the belting. The shock threw the poor fellow on the floor, but he got up unaided, and instructed those present how to dress his injuries pending surgical attention. The police ambulance was promptly sent for, and he was conveyed in it to the Infirmary, but his demeanour throughout was so brave and collected that it was not until on the way to the institution that he lost consciousness. At the infirmary it was found necessary to amputate the limb at the shoulder. Ware's knowledge of "first aid" is easily explained. He is an old member of the St. John Ambulance Brigade, and in that capacity served in the South African war. On his return he was selected to represent the district at the presentation of medals by the King himself, and thus had the distinction of receiving his decoration at the hands of his Majesty. Ware, who is 42 years of age, and married, resides at 9, Moore-street. He is reported to be going on as well as can be expected.

Derby Daily Telegraph, Thursday 21st July 1904

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Walter Ware, St. John Ambulance Brigade 5 months 3 days ago #61776

  • djb
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Certainly a story of two halves, Berenice.

It must take you quite a while to prepare the text for your posts and this is greatly appreciated.

Dr David Biggins

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Dr David Biggins

Walter Ware, St. John Ambulance Brigade - died 11.1.1923 5 months 2 days ago #61783

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I found a mention of his having received his medal, and have inserted it in the top post.

He seems to have kept his association with the Brigade, as a Walter Ware was awarded a Home Hygiene Certificate the year after the accident, along with some of the other names from the 1902 presentation..
Derby Daily Telegraph, Wednesday 21st June 1905
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In 1915, as a member of the SJAB, Derby Division, Sanitation Class, he received a further award.
Derby Daily Telegraph, Friday 9th July 1915
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AMBULANCE OFFICER'S DEATH

DERBY MAN WHO GAVE DIRECTIONS WHEN INJURED.

The death occurred suddenly at his residence in Moore-street, Derby, on Sunday, of Ambulance Officer Walter Ware. Deceased had been connected with the St. John Brigade in the town for many years, and had reached the rank of ambulance officer. He was taken ill last week, and had a slight stroke on Saturday, expiring the following morning.
Mr. Ware had his heart and soul in ambulance work, and was one of the original members of the order in Derby. He served in the South African war, and later had the misfortune to lose his arm in a machinery accident at Messrs. W. Fletcher and Son, Chaddesden laceworks, Nottingham-road. He showed extraordinary presence of mind and his own knowledge of ambulance work enabled him to direct his fellow-employees how to act in the emergency. He explained to them how to render first aid, and they carried out his orders in treating him.
During the Great War, Ambulance Officer Ware regularly assisted with the convoys of wounded that were sent to this area. For a considerable period he had acted as one of the gatemen at the Baseball Ground i]Derby County F.C.[/i, frequently doing duty at the players' entrance. Deceased, who was sixty years of age, leaves a widow i]Henrietta[/i and a grown-up family of four sons and three daughters. The funeral takes place on Thursday afternoon.

Derby Daily Telegraph, Monday 15th January 1923
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MR. W. WARE.

MEMBERS OF ST. JOHN BRIGADE ACT AS BEARERS.
Evidence of the esteem in which he was held was furnished by the presence of 30 members of the St. John Ambulance Brigade in St. Joseph's Church on Thursday afternoon. Mr. Ware joined the Derby Division of the brigade at its inception in 1899, and was also a member of the old Derby Volunteer Battalion. He went through the South African campaign attached to the R.A.M.C., and was at one time ward master in charge of over 300 beds. He held splendid credentials from the officers under whom he served.
His knowledge of first aid, no doubt, went far in saving his own life on one occasion. Some years ago, while following his occupation as a fitter, he met with a severe accident, having his right arm torn off by the machinery. He at once did the right thing in applying pressure, saving a tremendous loss of blood, till assistance arrived. He possessed long service medals in the Volunteers and the Ambulance Brigade, and also South African war medals.
Mr. Ware was carried to his last resting place by Sergts. Hallam and Hooper, Flux, Gilbert, and Corporals Bannister and Davis (of the Ambulance Brigade), Officer F. Grice being in charge. The coffin was draped with the Union Jack.
The chief mourners were Mrs. H. Ware (widow), Miss E. Ware, Miss Maud Ware, Mr. and Mrs. W. Ware, Mr. and Mrs. A. Ware, Mr. and Mrs. G. Ware, Mr. and Mrs. E. Ware, Mr. and Mrs. C. Cooke (daughter and son-in-law), and Mrs. E. M. Brock.
The coffin was of polished oak with brass fittings, the nameplate being inscribed "Walter Ware, at rest January 11th, 1923, aged 60 years."
Floral tributes, which were numerous, were received from the widow and family, relatives, and friends, officers and men of the St. John Ambulance Brigade, and Derby Trading and Supply Association.
The arrangements for the obsequies were carried out by the Derby and District Funeral Company.

Derby Daily Telegraph, Friday 19th January 1923


His place of internment is almost certainly Nottingham Road Cemetery, as his widow, Henrietta, who died on 28th February 1935, was buried there. She was still living at 9 Moore Street at the time of her death.

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