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Jordaan, Lourens Rasmus. Veldkornet adj 5 years 6 months ago #32235

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Served: General Smuts. Awarded the DTD (Dekoratie voor Trouwe Dienst).
Dr David Biggins

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Jordaan, Lourens Rasmus. Veldkornet adj 3 years 7 months ago #52504

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City Coins. September 2005.

DTD: V.Kornet en Adj. L.R. Jordaan;
DCM (GV): Sq.S.Mjr. L.R. Jordaan, Staff;
ABO: V.Kornet en Adj. L.R. Jordaan;
1914-15 Star: S.M. L.R. Jordaan, Brands V.S.S.;
BWM & AVM(Bil): Lt. L.R. Jordaan.

Lourens Rasmus Jordaan served during the Boer War as Field Cornet & Adjudant on the Staff of Gen Jan Smuts.

He was awarded the DCM for the German SWA Campaign. DCM; London Gazette 22 August 1918.
Dr David Biggins

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Jordaan, Lourens Rasmus. Veldkornet adj 2 years 4 months ago #59367

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Jordaan mentioned in a book by Ben Bouwer:
gmic.co.uk/topic/3093-for-killing-brits/

Most Boer war Boer officers who served on the govt side in WW1 served as officers once again. Jordaan, who had the top group had joined the regular army after the Boer war and was an NCO (with high connections as his superiors were all old comrades from the boer war era.)

From Ben Bouwers book where Jordaan kills a british soldier...

I was to take my men and trek with them through the Free State to the
vicinity of Zastron where General Smuts would join us about the 15th
of August. The other commandants received similar instructions.
The men were not informed of what we were going to do at once, but
with the assistance of the officers I drew up a list of seventy-five
names. This occupation of ours was interrupted by news of a column (enemy)
coming from Johannesburg evidently to Potchefstroom via Losberg.
Lochenberg brought the news of it and I rode out with him and a
strong detachment towards them, coming in sight of them on the farm
Elandsfontein. The men hid themselves in the orchards and
Lochenberg and I went to the house of Mr. Jan Pienaar, whose family
were still on the farm.

The column was passing the house by then, at a distance of eight hun-
dred yards, along the road, without any intention apparently of exa-
mining the houses. Nevertheless we posted two men on the roof to
observe their movements, it being my intention to attempt a surprise
attack from the rear as soon as they had passed. Lochenberg and I had
hitched our horses to a post outside the door and gone inside. It being
about eight o'clock in the morning Mrs. Pienaar offered to give us
breakfast which we gratefully accepted and were waiting for its ap-
pearance, when we heard the sound of horses' hooves. Lochenberg
and I took no notice; my nose and mind were both occupied with the
coming breakfast, which was nearing completion. But Mrs. Pienaar
went to a window, gave a shriek and called out "Heavens' the
English!"

Lochenberg and I dashed for the door and as we opened it six troopers
swung round the house. We sprang on our horses and dashed away,
but he missed his stirrup and fell off before he had gone ten yards,
which in a way was quite as remarkable as our surprise. Hardly had he
touched ground however when he fired but hit nobody. I continued to
race for cover and had just pulled up behind some trees a couple of
hundred yards away when Jordaan, one of my staff, and a few other
men who had been posted near, came up and fired on the troopers.

Jordaan killed one and the others dashed away into the trees.
We now expected that the column would advance towards the farm
but they continued their march as though nothing had happened. We
knew that, at the time, the soldiers had orders not to touch at farms,
and it is therefore probable that these six men had stalked the house
so succesfully because they were guarding against being seen going to
it by their own people and, probably, without a thought of us.
I could not help regretting the death of the trooper shot here, a fine,
handsome fellow he was too, who had doubtless approached the farm
with no more serious purpose than that of asking for a morning cup of
coffee.

The two men on the roof had failed to see the troopers and that was
one of the very few occasions I have known a Boer sentry to fail.
Altogether it was a morning of surprises.
When the rear-guard passed we attacked it, but they had doubtless
received notice of our presence; the pith had been taken out of our
enterprise and the whole thing came to nothing.
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