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TOPIC: Medals to the Natal Carbineers

Medals to the Natal Carbineers 3 months 2 weeks ago #66646

  • QSAMIKE
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Milne wrote: Hello,
this medal belonged to my great grandfather, Walter John Crouch. I have attached some family photographs of him. Should you ever wish to part with it please could you give me the opportunity to have it returned to my family. Regards Lesley Milne


Hi Lesley. have made a note in my catalogue...…

Mike
Life Member
Past-President Calgary
Military Historical Society
O.M.R.S. 1591

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Medals to the Natal Carbineers 2 months 1 day ago #67267

  • djb
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Picture courtesy of DNW

QSA (2) Natal, Transvaal (783 Tpr: J. Leddra. Natal Carbnrs:);
RNR LS&GC GV (C. 2912. J. Leddra, Sea. R.N.R.)

John Leddra was born in 1875 in St. Ives, Cornwall. He served with the Natal Carbineers during the Boer War and received the Queen’s South Africa Medal with Natal and Transvaal clasps. He then transferred to the 1st Natal Volunteer Composite Regiment on 1 October 1900, with which unit he additionally qualified for the South Africa 1901 clasp.

Returning to St. Ives after the war Leddra joined the Royal Naval Reserve in late 1902 and completed his first period of seagoing training aboard H.M.S. Revenge between 2 January 1903 and 31 March 1903, followed by annual training including a brief assignment in H.M.S. Prince George in early 1912. His regular employment working for the Town Council in St. Ives came to an end when he was called up on 1 August 1914, just prior to the outbreak of the Great War. He immediately joined the ship’s company of H.M.S. Albion, aboard which battleship he remained until 28 May 1916. During this period Albion served in the Channel Fleet and was sent to support the operations against German West Africa. Sailing to the Mediterranean in January 1915, she participated in the Dardanelles Campaign, including major attacks on the Ottoman coastal fortifications. He finally joined the Q-ship H.M.S. Penshurst (a.k.a. Q.7) on 28 July 1916, serving in her up until he left the vessel, injured, shortly before her demise at the hands of U-111 in December 1917.

During his time aboard Penshurst, this legendary Q-Ship had accounted for two enemy submarines and seriously damaged three others. He was present at actions with enemy U-boats on ten occasions over a 13 month period. Having been medically discharged ashore to H.M.S. Vivid from Penshurst in November 1917, Leddra served briefly in H.M.S. Macedonia during 1918 and was demobilised on 18 January 1919. He was presented with his Naval L.S. & G.C. Medal on 6 November 1919. He was unfortunate to receive no decoration. Had he avoided injury and remained aboard the Penshurst for her final month afloat he would have certainly received the D.S.M. along with all other original crew members; nonetheless, he was later awarded £12 10s, his share of Penshurst’s prize money. He died in Cornwall in 1963.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the Natal Carbineers 2 months 20 hours ago #67286

  • Frank Kelley
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A great shame, that would have been a most pleasing group.


djb wrote:


Picture courtesy of DNW

QSA (2) Natal, Transvaal (783 Tpr: J. Leddra. Natal Carbnrs:);
RNR LS&GC GV (C. 2912. J. Leddra, Sea. R.N.R.)

John Leddra was born in 1875 in St. Ives, Cornwall. He served with the Natal Carbineers during the Boer War and received the Queen’s South Africa Medal with Natal and Transvaal clasps. He then transferred to the 1st Natal Volunteer Composite Regiment on 1 October 1900, with which unit he additionally qualified for the South Africa 1901 clasp.

Returning to St. Ives after the war Leddra joined the Royal Naval Reserve in late 1902 and completed his first period of seagoing training aboard H.M.S. Revenge between 2 January 1903 and 31 March 1903, followed by annual training including a brief assignment in H.M.S. Prince George in early 1912. His regular employment working for the Town Council in St. Ives came to an end when he was called up on 1 August 1914, just prior to the outbreak of the Great War. He immediately joined the ship’s company of H.M.S. Albion, aboard which battleship he remained until 28 May 1916. During this period Albion served in the Channel Fleet and was sent to support the operations against German West Africa. Sailing to the Mediterranean in January 1915, she participated in the Dardanelles Campaign, including major attacks on the Ottoman coastal fortifications. He finally joined the Q-ship H.M.S. Penshurst (a.k.a. Q.7) on 28 July 1916, serving in her up until he left the vessel, injured, shortly before her demise at the hands of U-111 in December 1917.

During his time aboard Penshurst, this legendary Q-Ship had accounted for two enemy submarines and seriously damaged three others. He was present at actions with enemy U-boats on ten occasions over a 13 month period. Having been medically discharged ashore to H.M.S. Vivid from Penshurst in November 1917, Leddra served briefly in H.M.S. Macedonia during 1918 and was demobilised on 18 January 1919. He was presented with his Naval L.S. & G.C. Medal on 6 November 1919. He was unfortunate to receive no decoration. Had he avoided injury and remained aboard the Penshurst for her final month afloat he would have certainly received the D.S.M. along with all other original crew members; nonetheless, he was later awarded £12 10s, his share of Penshurst’s prize money. He died in Cornwall in 1963.

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