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 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
GlasgowThomas WilliamLieutenantGLASGOW, THOMAS WILLIAM, Lieutenant, was born in 1876. He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, as Lieutenant, Queensland Mounted Infantry, taking part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill. Operations in the Transvaal, east and west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Reit Vlei and Zilikat's Nek. Operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River, 1900. Operations in Cape Colony, 30 November to December 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Thomas William Glasgow, Lieutenant, Queensland Mounted Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented there. He became Major, 1st Light Horse, 1 July 1914; served in the European War from 1914 to 1918; was mentioned in Despatches; promoted to Lieutenant Colonel; created a CMG, 1916; a CB, 1918, and a KCB, 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Queensland contingent
GleichenAlbert Edward WilfredMajorGLEICHEN, COUNT (later Lord Albert Edward Wilfred), Major General, was born in London 15 January 1863, son of Admiral Prince (and Princess) Victor of Hohenlohe-Langenburg. He was educated at Cheam, Charterhouse, and Sandhurst, and joined the Grenadier Guards, 1881. He served in the Guards' Camel Regiment in the Nile Expedition, 1884. Count Gleichen published 'With the Camel Corps up the Nile': "One day in September, 1884, on coming off one of those numerous guards in Dublin that make the subaltern's life a burden to him, I found the joyful news awaiting me that I was to go out to the Sudan at once with the Camel Corps detachment of my battalion. As everybody knows, this sudden despatch of troops to the Nile was due to the Government having suddenly taken into its head the idea that it was necessary to rescue General Gordon from his perilous position at Khartoum, which he had held since the previous February. Better late than never! Accordingly an expedition was equipped to proceed up the river in pursuance of a determination which ought to have been carried out at least three months earlier. The idea had only recently been started that, in order to allow of troops acting with any success up the Nile, it was absolutely necessary that a certain proportion of them should be mounted on camels, both for facility of transport across the desert (if necessary) to Khartoum, and for rapidity of action. Accordingly a Camel Corps was organized, drawn half from the Cavalry and half from the Infantry. The Cavalry part was to be composed of detachments from all the Cavalry regiments in Great Britain—at the time subdivided into 'Heavies' and 'Lights'; the Infantry part of the detachments from the Brigade of Guards, and from the regiments already out in Egypt, these last to go by the name of (Camel) Mounted Infantry. They were as good men as could be got anywhere, and a finer ship-load than those on board the Deccan never left England. Mounting a frisky camel is exciting work for a beginner and nearly always results in a cropper. The mode of procedure should be thus: Having made your camel to kneel by clearing your throat loudly at him and tugging at his rope, shorten your rein till you bring his head round to his shoulder, put your foot in the stirrup to throw your leg over. With his head jammed like that, he cannot rise, and must wait until you give him his head. Unless you do as directed, he will got up before your leg is over; if this happens, stand up in the stirrup till he is up, and then throw your leg over, otherwise you will infallibly meet with a hideous catastrophe. A camel's leg will reach anywhere—over his head, round his chest, and on to his hump. He will chew the root of his tail, nip you in the calf, or lay the top of his head on his hump. To the uninitiated a camel going for one with his mouth open and gurgling horribly is a terrifying spectacle, but do not mind him, it is only his way. A camel is not intended by nature to be groomed, so do not groom him. You might, as well groom an Irish pig. With infinite pains you beat the dust out of his skin, remove as many as possible of the ticks and maggots that infest him, wipe his nose-(if he has a cold), and finish up by washing off any mud, and drying him with a wisp of dhurra stalk. What is the result? The moment your back is turned over he goes, and enjoys a delicious roll in the dust and dirt again, making himself filthier than before. The natives understand all this, and instead of cleaning him, and making him more susceptible to the heat of the sun, plaster him all over with mud during the hot months, which keeps the sun and flies off during the day, and maybe protects him from the cold at night". Count Gleichen lost his camel: "I made every inquiry afterwards about a big white camel with a blue and white nose-band, a vile temper, and a hole in his head big enough to put your helmet in. I never heard any more of him. Peace to his bones! Beyond Dongola, the GCR had long ceased to be a camel regiment, and we were once more to be genuine infantry. It was very sad to compare our present state with what we were seven months before, going up country. Then each man had a camel of his own, real breeches and putties, and a respectable grey tunic. Now every man was reduced to his own legs as a transport, khaki trousers much too short for him, and a badly-fitting khaki tunic. Then the GCR was over 400 strong, with every hope for the future; now the object for which we came was gone, and there were 90 of us gone also". He was promoted to Captain 21 September 1892; was Equerry to the Prince of Wales, 12 January to 11 February 1892; Extra Equerry to the Queen 12 February 1892 to 22 January 1901; Staff Captain and DAAG (Intelligence), Headquarters of Army, 5 May 1895, to 14 July 1899. He served in the Expedition to Dongola, 1896, receiving the Medal and Egyptian Medal; accompanied the Rodd Mission to Abyssinia in 1897, and became Major 28 October 1898. Count Gleichen served in the South African War from 1899 to 1900, first with the 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards, in the Guards Brigade, and then as DAAG, Transport, 20 January to 22 February 1900, taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Belmont, Enslin and Modder River (severely wounded). He was with the 9th Division as Intelligence Officer 23 February to 29 June, 1900, and was present in the operations in the Orange Free State, including those at Paardeberg, and the actions at Poplar Grove, Blaauweberg and Heilbron, and was Provost-Marshal under the Military Governor, Pretoria, 30 June to 19 August 1900. Then he was IO to Eastern Line of Communications to 30 November 1900. He was mentioned twice in Despatches [London Gazette, 26 January 1900 and 8 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Albert Edward Wilfred, Count Gleichen, CVO, CMG, Major Grenadier Guards. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the Sirdar 6 November 1901. He was appointed an Extra Equerry to King Edward 23 July 1901, and was employed with the Egyptian Army 7 February 1901 to 14 October 1903, as Director of Intelligence and Sudan Agent (Second Class Medjidie); was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 14 October 1903; was Military Attache, Berlin, 15 October 1903 to 27 January 1906, and Military Attache, Washington and Mexico, 28 January 1906 to 29 January 1907; was given the Brevet of Colonel 15 October 1906; Assistant Director of Military Operations, War Office, 1 February 1907 to 31 July 1911; Extra Equerry to King George 10 June, 1910. He was Temporary Brigadier General 1 August 1911 to 1 March, 1915; commanded the 15th Brigade, Irish Command, and was in charge at Belfast during the Churchill meeting and other troubles. Count Gleichen served in the European War (as Brigade Commander 5 August 1914 to 1 March, 1915), and took the brigade to France 14 August 1914. He was present at the Battles of Mons and Le Cateau, at the Retreat from Mons, and the Battles of the Marne, Aisne, Festubert and Ypres. He was promoted to Major General, "for distinguished service" 18 February 1915, and appointed to train and command the 37th Division 6 April, 1915, taking it to France on 30 July 1915. He assisted in the Great Push of 1 July 1916. In 1917 he organized and directed the Intelligence Bureau, Department of Information, 1917-18, and was afterwards employed in the Ministry of Information. He was twice mentioned in Despatches. Lord Edward Gleichen wrote several interesting and amusing books: 'With the Camel Corps up the Nile' (1888); 'Armies of Europe' (translation, 1890); 'With the Mission to Menelik, 1897'; 'The Doings of the 15th Brigade' (1917), etc, and has compiled and edited the 'Chronology of the War' (in three volumes). His favourite recreations were shooting and travelling. He married, in 1910, the Honourable Sylvia Edwardes (a Maid of Honour to Queen Alexandra), daughter of the Honourable Mrs Henry Edwardes; and in 1917 he dropped his foreign title and became Lord Grenadier Guards
GloverRobert Frederick BroughtonMajorGLOVER, ROBERT FREDERICK BROUGHTON, Major, was born 22 June 1859, son of Captain Glover, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. He was educated privately, and served in the Nile Expedition, 1884-85, and was present at the action of Kirbekan (Medal with two clasps; Bronze Star). He became Lieutenant, South Staffordshire Regiment, 26 March 1884; Captain 1 November 1890, and Major 3 August 1902. He served in the South African War, 1900-2, and took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, April to May 1900; in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); in the Transvaal in July 1901, and again in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Robert Frederick Broughton Glover, Major, South Staffordshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Lieutenant Colonel 22 June 1907, and Lieutenant Colonel, Middlesex Regiment, 21 February 1908. He commanded the 3rd Middlesex Regiment; became Colonel 19 July 1911, and retired 23 May 1914. In the European War he served with the British Expeditionary Force, in command of the 12th Middlesex Regiment, and was mentioned in Despatches. Colonel Glover married, in 1886, Frances Alice de Courcy, daughter of Colonel and the Honourable Mrs Stretton, and they had one son.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South Staffordshire Regiment
GlubbFrederic ManleyMajorGLUBB, FREDERIC MANLEY, Major, was born 19 August 1857, son of Orlando Manley Glubb, 37th BNI, (descended from an old Cornish family), and of Frances Letitia Kelly. He entered the Royal Engineers 25 January 1877, as Lieutenant; was promoted Captain 25 January 1888, and Major 12 August 1895. Major Glubb served in the South African War, 1899-1901, taking part in operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek 6 to 9 June; operations in the Transvaal, June 1900; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Frederic Manley Glubb, Major, Royal Engineers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 16 April 1903; was given the Brevet of Colonel 16 April 1906; became Colonel 16 August 1908, and was appointed Chief Engineer, Northern Command, 1909-12, and was Chief Engineer, Southern Command, Salisbury, 1912-14. When the European War broke out he was appointed Chief Engineer, 3rd Corps, British Expeditionary Force, France, and in May 1915, Chief Engineer, 2nd Army, British Expeditionary Force, in which capacity he served till the end of the war in France, Belgium, Italy and Germany. He has been mentioned several times in Despatches; created a CB, 1914; promoted Major General for Distinguished Service in the Field in 1915; created a KCMG on 1 January 1918; created Commandeur of the Legion d'Honneur, and of the Order of Leopold of Belgium in 1917, and of the Corona d' Italia in 1918. He married, in 1889, Frances Letitia, daughter of B W Bagot, JP, of Carranure, County Roscommon.
KCMG, CB (c), DSO, QSA (5) CC OFS Trans L-N SA 01 (RE), 1914 Star and Bar, BWM, Victory Medal with MID, Legion dHonneur (France) 3rd Class, Croix de Guerre (France), Order of Leopold (Belgium), Croix de Guerre (Belgium), Order of the Crown (Italy) 3rd Class. RE Regimental Museum Chatham 1992.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
GlynGeoffrey CarrCaptainGLYN, GEOFFREY CARR, Captain, was born 19 April, 1864, eldest son of the Honourable Pascoe Glyn and Caroline Henrietta, daughter of Captain W Amherst Hale. He served in the South African War, in the Rhodesian Regiment, 1900-2; was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal and four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Geoffrey Carr Glyn, Captain, Rhodesia Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The insignia were presented by HM the King 19 July 1901. He was Private Secretary to the Lieutenant-Governor, Transvaal, 1903-5, and Military Secretary to the Governor of Madras, 1905-8. He became Lieutenant Colonel Commanding the North Somerset Yeomanry. Lieutenant Colonel G Carr Glyn served in the European War, 1914-15; was mentioned in Despatches, wounded, and created a CMG in 1916. He married, in 1889, the Honourable Winifred Harbord, sixth daughter of the 5th Baron Suffield, and they had one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Rhodesia Regiment
Godfrey-FaussettOwen GodfreyCaptainGODFREY-FAUSSETT, OWEN GODFREY, Captain, was born 13 May 1866. He was the eldest surviving son of Colonel W Godfrey-Faussett, of Parley Moor, Binfield. He was gazetted to the Essex Regiment as Lieutenant 30 January 1886, and became Captain 15 February 1897. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and was present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, including action at Belfast (26 and 27 August); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, including action at Frederickstad (17 to 25 October); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including actions at Colesberg (1 to 29 January); operations in the Transvaal and Cape Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Owen Godfrey Godfrey-Faussett, Captain, Essex Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 January 1902. Captain Godfrey-Faussett was Adjutant, Volunteers, 14 June 1902 to 31 October 1905, and he was prompted to Major 25 November 1905. He served in the European War, and was killed in action at the Dardanelles on 4 May 1915. Lieutenant Colonel Godfrey-Faussett married, in 1899, Annette Gertrude, daughter of Reverend Alfred du Cane, and they had two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Essex Regiment
GodleyHarry CreweCaptainGODLEY, HARRY CREWE, Captain, was born at Fermoy, County Cork, Ireland, 30 October 1861, son of Major H R C Godley, 28th Regiment, and Mrs Frances Godley. He was educated at the Grammar School, Chard, Somerset, and was gazetted to a Regular Commission from the Militia 30 January 1881; was Adjutant, 3rd Volunteer Battalion Norfolk Regiment, from 15 September 1892 to 14 September 1897. He served in the South African War of 1899 to 1902, and was in South Africa from October 1899 to January 1900, during which time he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901], and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Harry Crewe Godley, Captain, Northumberland Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The DSO was awarded for the excellent services he rendered during the campaign, when he was left in command of a post with two companies of the Northampton Regiment, to command Enslin Railway Station, on the (2nd or) 8th September 1899, and defended it for nine hours against a force of from 930 to 1,000 mounted Boers with two guns, under Commandant Prinsloo, who made a surprise attack in order to destroy the line and capture the stores which were being guarded; and, notwithstanding the very superior force of the burghers, the two companies of the Northampton Regiment successfully resisted the attack until relieved by reinforcements from Lord Methuen, when the enemy retreated. He returned to England January 1900, was granted sick leave, and appointed Deputy Assistant Adjutant-General, Jersey, during 1902, and died at Ryde, Isle of Wight, 19 February 1907, after a service of 23 years and 21 days. He always took a great interest in the regimental sports, and his company was first for the 'Evelyn Wood' Competition, 1898, and second the year following. He was very sociable and popular with all ranks, very active, a good rider, fond of horses, and very keen on hunting. Major Godley married, at Monkstown, Dublin, 23 April, 1892, Elizabeth Mary Annesley; they had three sons: Francis William Crewe, born 25 January 1893; Gerald Annesley George, born 15 April, 1897; Richard Harry Fetherston, born 31 May 1902; and a daughter, Elizabeth Adeline Faith.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Northumberland Fusiliers
GodmanSherard HaughtonCaptainGODMAN, SHERARD HAUGHTON, Captain, was born 3 January 1865, son of Joseph Godman, of Park Hatch, Godalming. He entered the Scots Guards 9 March 1887: became Lieutenant 15 May 1889, and Captain 2 February 1898. He served in the South African War, 1900-2, and was present at operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Biddulphsberg and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Sherard Haughton Godman, Captain, Scots Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902. He was promoted Major 16 March, 1901, and retired from the Scots Guards 15 April 1908. He served in the European War, 1915-17, in France, and was wounded at Loos, and in 1918 he served in Mesopotamia. He was mentioned in Despatches, and given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel, Reserve of Officers, 1 June 1916, and promoted Lieutenant Colonel. Major Godman married, in 1904, Florence (who died in 1912), widow of Sir A C Jervoise, 3rd Baronet.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Scots Guards
GoffCecil Willie Trevor ThomasCaptainGOFF, CECIL WILLIE TREVOR THOMAS, Captain, was born 26 May 1860, second son of Joseph Golf and Lady Adelaide Henrietta Louisa Hortense Knox, daughter of the 2nd Lord Ranfurley. He was educated at Radley, and entered the 59th Foot 14 January 1880; became Lieutenant, East Lancashire Regiment, 19 May 1881; Captain 10 August 1890; was Adjutant, Militia, from 19 March 1895; promoted to Major in 1901. He served in the South African War of 1899-1902; as Adjutant of the 3rd Battalion East Lancashire Regiment 1900-1, and in 1902 with the 1st Battalion; received the Queen's and King's Medals with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Cecil Willie Trevor Thomas Goff, Captain, East Lancashire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He died 4 August 1907, of heart failure, at Folkestone.
DSO, QSA (2) CC OFS (Maj & Adj E Lancs Regt). Gibbons 1979 £485.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
East Lancashire Regiment
GoodwynPercy Charles WildmanLieutenantGOODWYN, PERCY CHARLES WILDMAN, Lieutenant, was born 13 October 1879. He entered the Army as a Second Lieutenant in the East Lancashire Regiment 18 October 1899, becoming Lieutenant 7 June 1900. He served in the South African War from 1900 to 1902, with the Mounted Infantry, being present in operations in the Orange Free State, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria; operations in the Transvaal, December 1900 to January 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, July 1901 to February 1902, operations in Cape Colony, May 1901, September 1901, and May 1902. For his services he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 9 July and 10 September 1901]; had the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Percy Charles Wildman Goodwyn, Lieutenant, East Lancashire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 18 December 1902. He was promoted Captain 8 February 1908, and served as Adjutant of Militia, and in the Special Reserve from November 1907 to November 1911. He again saw active service in the European War, being employed as Adjutant of the 7th Battalion Manchester Regiment September 1914 to May 1915. He became Major 28 May 1915, and was Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, 7th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment December 1915 to October 1917; Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, East Lancashire Regiment October 1917 to March, 1918, and Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, March 1918 to March, 1919, when he was given the command of the 51st Battalion Manchester Regiment. Lieutenant Colonel P C W Goodwyn married, in 1908, Katharine Agnes, only daughter of R W J Murray, of Edinburgh.
DSO, QSA (3) CC OFS Tr, KSA (2), 14-15 Star, BWM, VM.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
East Lancashire Regiment
GordonFrederickMajorGORDON, FREDERICK, Major The Honourable, was born 9 October 1861, son of Edward Strathearn, Baron Gordon of Druinearn, and of his wife, Agnes Joanna, Baroness Gordon of Druinearn. He was educated at Edinburgh Academy, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; joined the Army 22 January 1881, serving in the 49th Regiment from January to October 1881, as Subaltern; became Lieutenant 1 July 1881. He served in the Gordon Highlanders from 14 September 1881 to August 1911. He took part in the Egyptian Campaign of 1882-84, being present at the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir (Medal with clasp; Bronze Star). In the Sudan in 1884 he was present at the battles of El Teb and Tamai (two clasps). He again served in the Sudan in 1889; was present at the action of Toski, and received a clasp, having been employed with the Egyptian Army from 1 July 1889 to 17 August 1889. He was promoted to Captain 1 November 1890; was Brigade Major, Malta, 12 August 1896 to 8 October 1899; became Major 22 October 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as DAAG (Intelligence), 9 October 1899, to 6 November 1899, and DAAG 7 November 1899 to 11 September 1902. From October 1899 to October 1900, he was with Sir Redvers Buller's Force and from October 1900 to June, 1902, he was DAAG, Headquarters, South Africa. He was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the operations of 17 to 24 January 1900; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900), and action at Pieter's Hill. Operations in Natal (March to June, 1900), including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June). Operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September). Operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches by Sir R H Buller, 30 March, 19 June and 9 November 1900 [London Gazette 8 February 1901, and 29 July 1902]. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901: "Frederick Gordon, Major, Gordon Highlanders. For services during the recent operations in South Africa”. He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel, 22 August 1902. He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 9 January 1903, and commanded the 1st Battalion Gordon Highlanders from January 1908, to August 1911. He became Colonel 30 August 1911; was GSO, 1st Grade, to the 2nd Division, Aldershot Command, 10 August 1911 to 4 August 1914. On the outbreak of the European War he accompanied the Division to France (GSO, 1st Grade, 5 August 1914 to 4 September 1914). On 5 September 1914, he was appointed Temporary Brigadier General, and to command the 18th Infantry Brigade in the field. He was promoted Major General 3 June 1915, for distinguished service in the field, and was appointed to command a division of New Armies 17 June 1915, and in the same year was created a CB. In 1917 he was created a KCB, having been mentioned in Despatches five times from 1914 to 1917. Sir Frederick Gordon received the Serbian Order of the White Eagle, 2nd Class with Swords, in 1917. He married Mabel Rose, daughter of James Douglas Robinson, Madras Civil Service, and Mrs Robinson, and they had one son and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Gordon Highlanders
GordonLaurence George FrankMajorGORDON, LAURENCE GEORGE FRANK, Major, was born 21 May 1864, son of Colonel G G Gordon, CB, CVO He was gazetted to the Royal Artillery 1 August 1883; was extra ADC to the Viceroy of India 30 September 1886 to 13 April, 1908; became Captain 10 January 1893, and Major 13 February 1900; served in South Africa, 1899-1900; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations on Tugela Heights (22 to 27 February 1900), and action at Pieter's Hill; during operations in Natal, March to June, 1900, including actions at Laing's Nek 6 to 9 June; during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, August to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August), and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September). Took part in the operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to June, 1901; December 1901 to May 1902; during operations in Orange River Colony in May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901], and received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Laurence George Frank Gordon, Major, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". (Insignia, etc, sent to the Commander-in-Chief, South Africa. Presented by the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 August 1901). He was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 13 February 1910. Lieutenant Colonel Gordon served in the European War from 1914; became Colonel 17 May 1915; was mentioned in Despatches, and created a CB in 1915. He was Colonel, Royal Artillery, graded AAG, 11 February 1916; Temporary Brigadier General 21 June, 1917. Colonel Gordon married, in 1895, Florence Juliette, daughter of C A Walters, and widow of Alexander M'Hinch, CIE, and they had one daughter.
CB (m), DSO, QSA (5) T-H RofL L-N Belf OFS (Maj RFA), KSA (2) (Maj RFA), 1914 Star (Lt Col RFA), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Col), 1911 Delhi Durbar. Sotheby's 1971 £250.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
GordonRobertCaptainGORDON, ROBERT, Captain, was born 22 December 1866, son of James Gordon, of Nunbank, Dumfries, and later of Townsville, Queensland, Australia, for many years Magistrate and Mining Commissioner at Townsville, Queensland. He was educated at the Brisbane Grammar School, and at the High School, Hobart, Tasmania; joined the Queensland Mounted Infantry, 1891; served in the Tirah Campaign, attached to the 1st Gordon Highlanders, 1897-98 (Despatches; Medal and two clasps); went to South Africa with 1st Queensland Contingent, and was transferred to the 1st Gordon Highlanders, 1900; given command of the Gordon Highlanders Mounted Infantry Company; in command till wounded 30 January 1901. He took part in the operations in Cape Colony, November 1899 to February 1900. Operations in Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February), actions at Poplar Grove, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions at Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June). Operations in Orange River Colony, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Wittebergen. Operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to January 1901 (severely wounded). He was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Robert Gordon, Captain, Queensland Mounted Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were presented by the King 3 June, 1901. He retired from the 1st Contingent, Queensland Mounted Infantry, 5 October 1902; was transferred as Major from the Reserve of Officers to the Queensland Mounted Infantry, 10 December 1904; became Honourable Captain in the Army. At the outbreak of the European War he was sent to German East Africa on Special Service, resigning for this purpose from the command of the North Rhodesian Rifles. During the European War, 1914-18, he was appointed Intelligence Officer, in command of the North Rhodesian Scouts in German South-West Angolaland and on the borders of North Rhodesia. He pursued and captured a party of Germans who were endeavouring to break through German South-West to German East Africa. These Germans belonged to the Camel Corps in German South-West Africa, were mounted on camels, and had penetrated far into Angola. Lieutenant General Smuts, Minister of Defence in the South African Union, sent his congratulations through the Rhodesian Commandant-General on this capture. He went to British East Africa in February 1916, and commanded the Remount Landing Depot at Mombasa, and later No 1 Base Remount Depot, Maktau; commanded Remount Depot at Daressalaam, Kilwa, and Linde. Lieutenant Colonel Gordon was twice mentioned in Despatches; was given the OBE in 1918, and created a CMG in 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Queensland contingent
Gordon-GilmourRobertMajorGORDON-GILMOUR, ROBERT, Major, of Liberton and Craigmillar, was born 27 February 1857, son of Colonel Wolrige Gordon and Anne, daughter of Robert Gordon, of Hallhead and Esslemont. He was educated at Eton and at Christ Church, Oxford, and joined the 94th Foot 23 January 1878, becoming Second Lieutenant, Grenadier Guards, 17 May 1879. He served in the South African War of 1879, in the Zulu Campaign, being present at the Battle of Ulundi (Medal with clasp). He became Lieutenant 1 July 1881, and served in the Sudan Expedition, 1884-85 (Nile), with the Guards' Camel Corps, actions of Abu Klea and Abou Krou, and operations against Metemmeh, January 1885 (Medal with two clasps; Bronze Star). He was promoted to Captain 23 July 1890. He was Assistant Private Secretary to the Secretary of State for War 27 January 1891 to August 1892, and was promoted to Major 25 August 1896. Major Gordon-Gilmour served in the South African War, 1900-2. He was in command of the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards from 30 May to 11 October 1900, and from 28 March to 21 June 1901, and 8 August to 3 November 1901; operations in the Orange Free State, April to May 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions of Biddulphsberg and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in the Transvaal, February to March 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, December 1900 to February 1901, and March 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps; was created a CB, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Robert Gordon-Gilmour, Major, Grenadier Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent out to South Africa to Lord Kitchener, and presented by General E S Brook at Bethlehem 3 May 1902. He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 28 October 1902; was given the Brevet of Colonel 28 October 1905; was created an MVO in 1905, and became Colonel 13 July 1907. He commanded the Grenadier Guards, 1908-10; was created a CVO in 1910, and retired 16 July 1910. He had the Jubilee Medal and King George's Coronation Medal. He commanded the Grenadier Guards in August and September 1914; the 98th Infantry Brigade in September and November, and took it to France. He was given the honorary rank of Brigadier General 3 April 1917, and was Area Commandant, June to October 1917; Commandant, Cape Troops, XlXth Corps, November to February 1919 (Despatches). He assumed the name of Gilmour in 1887, on succeeding to the estates of his great-uncle, W L Gilmour, of Craigmillar. Brigadier General Gordon-Gilmour was Brigadier and Adjutant, Royal Company of Archers (King's Bodyguard for Scotland); Gentleman Usher of the Green Rod (Order of the Thistle); Grand Master Mason of Scotland. He was a JP and DL. He married, on 19 October 1889, at Madresfield Church, Worcestershire, the Lady Susan Lygon, second daughter of Frederick, 6th Earl Beauchamp, and they had three daughters: Mary, Margaret and Grizel, and a son, John, born 5 June, 1899.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Grenadier Guards
GorleHarry VaughanCaptainGORLE, HARRY VAUGHAN, Captain, was born at Poughill, Cornwall, 3 September 1868, third son of Captain John Taylor Gorle, late of HM 28th Regiment of Foot. He was educated privately, and joined the Royal Berkshire Regiment from the 4th (Militia) Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment 28 June 1890, becoming Lieutenant, Lincolnshire Regiment, 29 September 1893; Army Service Corps 1 October 1893, and Captain, Army Service Corps, 1 April 1898. Captain Gorle served in the South African War, on the Staff, as DAAG, October 1899, to 15 February 1900, and from 24 March, 1902. He was present at the defence of Kimberley (arranged supplies and transport); operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River; operations in Orange River Colony, March to 31 May 1902; operations in Cape Colony 30 November 1900 to March, 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 6 May 1900, and 19 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Harry Vaughan Gorle, Captain, Army Service Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented by the Officer Commanding Troops, Kronstadt, 14 September 1902. He was promoted to Major 3 February 1905, and retired 6 June 1908. Major Gorle married (1st), in 1895, Ethel Catharine (who died in 1904), eldest daughter of the Reverend Canon Archdall, Rector of Glanrnire, County Cork. Their son was Temporary Lieutenant Robert Vaughan Gorle, MC, A Battery, 50th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, who was born at Southsea 6 May 1896. Major Gorle married (secondly), in 1914, Edith Mary, daughter of the Reverend J Love-bond Francis, Rector of Bridston, and they had one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Army Service Corps
GoschenArthur AlecSecond LieutenantGOSCHEN, ARTHUR ALEC, Second Lieutenant, was born 6 January 1880, third son of H Goschen, of Heathfield, Surrey. He entered the Royal Artillery 25 June 1899; served in South Africa, 1899-1901, taking part in operations in the Orange Free State, March to May 1900; operations in Orange River Colony (May to 29 November 1900), including action at Ladybrand; operations in Cape Colony February 1900; operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to April 1901; operations in Cape Colony, April to October 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Arthur Alec Goschen, Second Lieutenant, Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 17 December 1901. He was promoted to Lieutenant 16 February 1901, and to Captain 4 December 1907; was Adjutant, Royal Artillery, 2 January 1908 to 22 March 1910, and was promoted to Major 30 October 1914. He served in the European War, 1914-1918, as Brigade Major, Royal Artillery, 19th Division, New Armies, BEF, 1 February 1915 to 5 May 1916; as Acting Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Artillery, 19 September 1916 to 9 November 1916; Acting Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Artillery, from 24 November 1916. He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1918. He received two Bars to his DSO. Lieutenant Colonel A A Goschen married, in 1908, Marjorie Mary, daughter of Lieutenant Colonel W Blacker, of Castle Martin, Newbridge, Kildare.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
GoughAlan Percy GeorgeMajorGOUGH, ALAN PERCY GEORGE, Major, was born 13 September 1863, son of General Sir John B Gough, GCB. He was educated at Wellington College, and at the RMC, Sandhurst, and was gazetted to the Royal Welsh Fusiliers as Lieutenant 9 September 1882; served in the Burmese Expedition, 1885-87; was slightly wounded; mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 22 June, 1886, and 2 September 1887]; Medal with clasp). He was ADC to Major General, Bengal, 16 July 1887 to 31 March 1890; became Captain 15 June 1892; was Adjutant, Volunteers, 15 September 1892 to 15 March 1898; was promoted to Major 25 July 1900. Major Gough served in the South African War, 1899-1902, on the Staff (as DAAG) 27 December 1899 to 26 February 1900; Station Staff Officer (graded DAAG) from 9 July 1900; DAAG from 2G August 1900. In command of 1st Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers from 26 February to 24 June 1900, excepting period 2 to 11 May. Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900) and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July and August 1900, including actions at Venterskroon (7 August; slightly wounded); operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 October 1901]: "Alan Percy George Gough, Major, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Major Gough retired 25 October 1902. He joined the Denbighshire Hussars, Imperial Yeomanry, as Major and Honorary Lieutenant Colonel, 1904, and resigned in 1905. In 1914 he was recalled for service, and served with the BEF in France, 1914-16; was three times mentioned in Despatches; created a CMG in 1918, and a CBE in 1919, and promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, Reserve of Officers, 18 February 1917. He was employed at the War Office, 1917-19. Lieutenant Colonel Gough was JP and DL, Carnarvonshire. In 1895 he married Mary Georgina, daughter of F W Lloyd Edwards, of Nanboron, JP, DL, Chairman of Quarter Sessions, Carnarvonshire.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Welsh Fusiliers
GoulburnCuthbert EdwardMajorGOULBURN, CUTHBERT EDWARD, Major, was born 6 February 1860, son of Colonel Goulburn, of Betchworth House, Betchworth, Surrey. He was educated at Cheltenham College, and at the RMA, Woolwich, and entered the Royal Artillery 6 April 1879, becoming Captain 21 September 1887, and Major 8 April, 1897. He served in India and Africa, commanding the 42nd Battery, RFA. He also served in the South African War, 1899-1901, from the commencement till 1 May 1901, taking part in the operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Elandslaagte, Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop, and Defence of Ladysmith; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to May 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches (Sir George White, 2 December 1899, and 23 March, 1900; Sir R H Duller, 9 November 1900) [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Cuthbert Edward Goulburn, Major, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 25 July 1901. He became Lieutenant Colonel 23 December 1904, and retired 29 March, 1905; commanded RA (Territorial), North Midland Division, from 1909 to 1914, and became Colonel (Reserve of Officers), 1 October 1913, and for his services during the European War was given the honorary rank of Brigadier General 26 February 1916. From 1905 to 1910 Brigadier General Goulburn was Master of the Albrighton Hounds. He married, in 1902, Grace Ethel, eldest daughter of W E Foster, of Apley Park, Bridgnorth, and they had two sons and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
GowansJamesMajorGOWANS, JAMES, Major, was born 23 April 1872. He was educated at Harrow (The Knoll), where he was in the School Cricket and Football Elevens; then at Clare College, Cambridge. He was in the Cambridge Rugby Fifteen, 1892-93, and was a Member of the Scotland Rugby Fifteen in 1893-94-95-96. He served in South Africa, 1900-1; in operations in Natal, March to June, 1900; operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in September and October 1901, including the defence of Forts Itala and Prospect; operations in Orange River Colony, February to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; was awarded the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "James Gowans, Major, Durham Artillery (Militia). In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He retired as Captain, Durham Royal Field Reserve Artillery (Major and Honorary Lieutenant Colonel, Reserve of Officers). He married, in 1902, Erin Laura Muriel, daughter of William Wheelright, of Durban, Natal, and they had one son and two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Durham Artillery Volunteers
GrahamJohn Malise AnneCaptainGRAHAM, JOHN MALISE ANNE, Captain, was born 19 July 1869, son of General Sir S James Graham, KCB (who died 11 May 1917), and Laura Christiana (who died in 1874), daughter of A H Williams, HEICS. He was gazetted to the Royal Lancaster Regiment 9 November 1889; became Lieutenant 19 August 1891; was Adjutant, Royal Lancaster Regiment 12 July 1895 to 31 December 1896; was employed with the Egyptian Army from 1 January 1897, serving in the Nile Expedition of 1897 (Despatches [London Gazette, 25 January 1898], Egyptian Medal with clasp); in the Nile Expedition of 1898, when he took part in the Expedition to Shendy and the Battles of Atbara and Khartoum (Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898]), in the Relief of Gedaref and the Expedition to Kaka (4th Class Medjidie; Medal; two clasps to Egyptian Medal); in the Nile Expedition of 1899, as ADC to Lord Kitchener of Khartoum, in the operations in the first advance against the Khalifa. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902 (was promoted to Captain 25 January 1900), as Special Service Officer, and was present at operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including the action at Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg (29 May), Pretoria (4 June) and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June), when he was severely wounded; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Zilikat's Nek; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900. He served as Adjutant to a Mounted Infantry Battalion, May and June 1900; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "John Malise Anne Graham, Captain, Royal Lancaster Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. Captain Graham retired from the Royal Lancaster Regiment 4 July 1903. He served in the European War, 1914-18, as Lieutenant Colonel; was mentioned in Despatches and awarded a Bar to the Distinguished Service Order, and retired in 1918. He married, in 1903, Eva, daughter of J T Satow.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Royal Lancaster Regiment
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