Search:
(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
WatsonCharles FrederickLieutenantWATSON, CHARLES FREDERICK, Lieutenant, was born 29 June 1877, son of Colonel Fred Watson. He was educated at Wellington College, and entered the Army, from the Militia, as a Second Lieutenant in the Royal West Surrey Regiment 8 June 1898, becoming Lieutenant 7 May 1900. He served in South Africa from 1899 to 1902, and was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 1900, and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in Natal (March to June 1900), including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 5 June); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 190O to March 1901, and May 1901 to 31 May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, April and August 1901; operations in Cape Colony, May 1902. He was mentioned in Sir Redvers Buller's Despatches of 30 March and 9 November 1900 [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Charles Frederick Watson, Lieutenant, Royal West Surrey Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902. He became Captain 7 June 1903; passed through the Staff College, Camberley; became Brevet Major 28 September 1914. Major Watson saw active service in the European War; was employed as GSO3, with the 2nd Division, BEF, November 1914 to February 1915; as GSO2, 23rd Division, February 1915 to February 1916, and as GS01, with the latter Division until January 1917. In April and May 1917, he commanded a Service Battalion of the Royal West Surrey Regiment, and was GS01 at the General Headquarters of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force from July to September, becoming then Brigade Commander of the 139th Infantry Brigade, with this force. He was given his Brevet Lieutenant Colonelcy January 1918, and his Brevet Colonelcy 3 June 1919. He was created a CMG for his services in the war in 1916, and was three times mentioned in Despatches. Colonel Watson married, in 1906, Winifred, daughter of W H Woodruff, and they had two sons.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Queen's) Royal West Surrey Regiment
WatsonHarold FarnellLieutenantWATSON, HAROLD FARNELL, Lieutenant, was born 25 July 1876, son of W Farnell Watson. He entered the Army in 1897, and saw service with the Tirah Expeditionary Force, 1897 to 1898, for which he had the Medal and clasp; and in the South African War, 1899 to 1902, being employed as Adjutant of the 9th Mounted Infantry and afterwards of the 22nd Mounted Infantry. He took part in operations in Cape Colony, 1899 to 1900; operations in the Orange Free State, March to May 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to September 1900, and May 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Harold Farnell Watson, Lieutenant, Derbyshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted Captain in the Lancashire Fusiliers in 1902, and resigned his commission in 1903, the same year joining the 4th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, as Captain, in which he became Major in 1910. He became Lieutenant Colonel commanding the 11th Battalion Sherwood Foresters, June 1915; was promoted Major (from the Special Reserve) 25 August 1917, in the Regular Army, and commanded the 6th Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers from January to December 1918, then becoming Lieutenant Colonel to command the 53rd Battalion Liverpool Regiment. Major Farnell married, in 1901, Georgina Barbara, daughter of George Allan.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Sherwood Foresters) Derbyshire Regiment
WatsonWilliam ErnestLieutenantWATSON, WILLIAM ERNEST, Lieutenant, was born 3 September 1876, son of William Watson, of Bromborough, Cheshire. He entered the 6th Dragoon Guards 15 May 1897, becoming Lieutenant 25 January 1899. He served in the South African War from 1899 to 1902, being from January 1901 to May 1902, Adjutant of the 1st Imperial Light Horse, and was present, at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Karee Siding and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Reit Vlei and Belfast (26 and 27 August); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899 to 1900, including the actions at Colesberg (1 January to 12 February). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; had the Queen's and King's Medals with eight clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "William Ernest Watson, Lieutenant, 6th Dragoon Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 18 February 1903. He was promoted Captain 7 December 1901, and was Adjutant of the 6th Dragoon Guards from 2 July 1907 to 22 April 1910; was promoted Major 23 April 1910. He married, in 1905, Daisy, daughter of the Reverend T Stanley Heanor, and left two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
6th Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers)
WattJohn AlexanderCaptainWATT, JOHN ALEXANDER, Captain, was born in Aberdeenshire in 1856. He served in South Africa, with the South Australian Contingent, 1901-2, taking part in operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 15 November 1901]; awarded the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "John Alexander Watt, Captain, South Australian Contingent. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Captain Watt was transferred to the Reserve of Officers 10 December 1907, as Captain, and on 1 July 1913, was appointed an Area Officer, 4th Military District, Australian Commonwealth. He served for over a quarter of a century, and had the Volunteer Decoration.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South Australia contingent
WauchopeArthur GrenfellLieutenantWAUCHOPE, ARTHUR GRENFELL, Lieutenant, was born 1 March 1874, son of David Baird Wauchope, Edinburgh; was educated at St Ninian's, Moffat; Repton, Derbyshire; appointed Second Lieutenant, 4th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, in 1893, and Second Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), 1896; was promoted Lieutenant 3 August 1898; served on the Staff of Major General Wauchope, commanding Highland Brigade in South Africa; was severely wounded at Magersfontein. He took part in the operations in Cape Colony, south of the Orange River, 1899; received the Queen's Medal with clasp; King's Medal with two clasps; was mentioned in Despatches, 16 April 1901, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Arthur Grenfell Wauchope, Lieutenant, Black Watch. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by HM the King 3 June 1901. He was appointed ADC (Extra) to the Governor and Commander-in-Chief, Cape of Good Hope, from 17 April 1902 to 1 March 1903. On the outbreak of the European War he became Major, 26 September 1914, and temporary Lieutenant Colonel, 6 September 1915; was wounded, mentioned in Despatches, and created Officer of the Legion of Honour. Commanded 2nd Battalion The Black Watch in France and in Mesopotamia; Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, 1916; wounded, January 1916; Brevet Colonel, 1917; was created a CMG, 1917, and Temporary Brigadier General, and given command of the 24th Infantry Brigade, Indian Expeditionary Force ‘D' Mesopotamia Expeditionary Force, 11 May 1917. He was created a CIE in 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)
WauchopeDavid AlexanderLieutenantWAUCHOPE, DAVID ALEXANDER, Lieutenant, was born 31 January 1871, son of David Baird Wauchope, of Edinburgh. He was educated at Repton, and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he took his BA degree in 1892. and served in South Africa with the 6th Battalion (Lothians and Berwickshire) Imperial Yeomanry from 1899 to 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "David Alexander Wauchope, Lieutenant, 6th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry.` For services in South Africa". He retired; was embodied with the Lothians and Border Horse in August 1914, and went to France in 1915; commanded Divisional Mounted Troops in 1915, and Cape Mounted Troops in 1916. Lieutenant Colonel D A Wauchope held the Territorial Decoration and was a Member of the King's Body-Guard for Scotland, the Royal Company of Archers.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
6th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
WayArthur StrachanLieutenantWAY, ARTHUR STRACHAN, Lieutenant, was born on 5 March 1876, fourth son of the Reverend Bromley Way. He was educated at Marlborough College and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and joined the 2nd Battalion Durham Light Infantry, at Poona, in January 1890. He, served in South Africa from January 1900 to 29 January 1901, with the Mounted Infantry, and was killed in action on 29 January 1901. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service, Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Arthur Strachan Way, Lieutenant, Durham Light Infantry (deceased). In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to his father. His brother, Lieutenant Colonel Bromley Way, Sherwood Foresters, writes of Lieutenant Way: "He went to South Africa with the Durham Light Infantry Company of the Burmah Mounted Infantry in January 1900; was mentioned for gallantry at Sauna's Post and on subsequent occasions, and was killed in action 29 January 1901".
DSO, QSA (5) Paard Drief Joh D-H Witt (Lt, DLI). Spink 1990 £800. BDW 1991 £1,800.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Durham Light Infantry
WeddLawrence DunkinLieutenantWEDD, LAWRENCE DUNKIN, Lieutenant, was born 9 January 1878, and was gazetted to the Royal West Surrey Regiment, as Second Lieutenant, 16 February 1898. He was promoted to Lieutenant, and served in the South African War of 1899-1902; was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Lawrence Dunkin Wedd, Lieutenant, Royal West Surrey Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes of the DSO were sent to H G Wedd, Executor, as Lieutenant Wedd had not survived to be decorated with the Order.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Queen's) Royal West Surrey Regiment
WedgwoodCecilMajorWEDGWOOD, CECIL, Major, was born 28 March 18G3, at Trentram, Staffs, son of Godfrey Wedgwood and Mav, his wife. He was educated at Clifton College and Geneva University, and joined the 4th Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment 1882; served in the South African War from 1900 to 1902, as Commandant, December 1900 to June 1901; then as Railway Staff Officer (graded as a Staff Captain), and subsequently as District Commandant to July 1901; Commandant, Carnarvon, July to August 1901; Commandant, De Aar, April to May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches twice; received Medal with clasp; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Cecil Wedgwood, Major, North Staffordshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Major Wedgwood retired from the Army, and joined the Reserve of Officers. He was a Director of Messrs Josiah Wedgwood and Sons, and was the first Mayor of the Federated Borough of Stoke-on-Trent, 1910-12. He served in the European War from 1914, till he was killed in action on 3 July 1916.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince of Wales's) North Staffordshire Regiment
WelchmanEdward TheodoreSecond LieutenantWELCHMAN, EDWARD THEODORE, Second Lieutenant, was born 21 July 1881, and joined the Army, as a Second Lieutenant in the West Yorkshire Regiment, 11 July 1900; was promoted Lieutenant 20 March 1902. He served in the South African War, 1901-2; was present in operations in the Transvaal, April 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 17 January 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Edward Theodore Welchman, Second Lieutenant, West Yorkshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC, Natal District, 15 November 1902. In 1908 he served in operations in the Mohmand Country, North-West Frontier of India, for which he received the Medal and clasp. He became Captain 7 March 1910. He served in the European War, joining his battalion in France on 2 October 1914. He was wounded in action near Lille on the 20th of the same month, and died of his wounds in the Base Hospital at Boulogne 25 October 1914. He was buried at Boulogne. Captain Welchman was formerly a Member of the York and Ainsty Hunt. His favourite recreations were polo and golf.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince of Wales's Own) West Yorkshire Regiment
WeldonAnthony ArthurMajorWELDON, SIR ANTHONY ARTHUR, Major, was born in London 1 March 1863, eldest son of the 5th Baronet and Elizabeth, daughter of Colonel Arthur Kennedy. He was educated at Charterhouse, and at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he took his BA in 1884; joined the 4th Battalion Leinster Regt, in 1885, and became Major 13 October 1889; was ADC to FM Lord Wolseley, Commander-in-Chief, 1895-1900; served in the South African Campaign, 1899-1900, as Special Service Officer, with the Natal Field Force, under Sir Redvers Buller; as Railway Stall Officer, Lines of Communication, afterwards attached to the Army Service Corps. Operations in Natal, 1899: Relief of Ladysmith, including actions at Colenso, Spion Kop, Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900), and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in Natal, March to June 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901], received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Sir Anthony Arthur Weldon, Baronet, Major, 4th Battalion Royal Canadians (Leinster Regiment). In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 17 December 1903; the Warrant sent 24 January 1902. He was created a CVO, 1911. He was Deputy-Lieutenant, Queen's County; Justice of the Peace, Queen's County and County Kildare; State Steward and Chamberlain to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland. He married, in 1902, Winifred, daughter of Colonel Varty Rogers, of Broxmore Park, Ronisey, late of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers and His Majesty's Bodyguard of Gentlemen-at-Arms; and they had three sons. Sir A A Weldon died 29 June 1917, and was succeeded in the baronetcy by his eldest son, Anthony Edward Wolseley Weldon, born 1 December 1902.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Prince of Wales's Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadia
WeldonFrancis HarryCaptainWELDON, FRANCIS HARRY, Captain, was born 24 April 1869, in Madras, son of Colonel Thomas Weldon, CIE, Madras Staff Corps, and of Mrs H Weldon, daughter of General Simpson. He was educated at Cheltenham College, and at University College School, and joined the Sherwood Foresters 30 July 1890, becoming Lieutenant 21 July 1892, and Captain 28 November 1896. Captain Weldon served in the South African War, 1899 to 1902, on the Staff (as DAAG from 11 June 1900). He was present at operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Houtnek (Thoba Mountain) and Vet River (5 May); operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900. including action near Pretoria; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Lydenburg (5 to 8 September); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Eland's River (4 to 6 August); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1901): operations in the Transvaal, 30 November 1900 to May 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, May 1901 to March 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901); received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps; was placed on the list of Officers considered qualified for Staff Employment in consequence of service on the Staff in the Field, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Francis Harry Weldon, Captain, Derbyshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 18 December 1902. He retired 14 February 1906 and was Honorary Major, 4th Battalion Sherwood Foresters. Major Weldon married, 16 September 1902, at St Mary Bolton's, London, Eveleen Campbell, of Rivermount House, Pangbourne, daughter of Thomas Fielden Campbell, and they had two children, Sybil May and George Anthony Thomas, born 6 June 1908.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Sherwood Foresters) Derbyshire Regiment
WellsJohn BayfordLieutenantWELLS, JOHN BAYFORD, Lieutenant, was born 12 April 1881, son of Charles A E Wells, of Heathfield, Albury, Guildford Surrey, and of Annie Macdonak Susannah Wells (Burt). He was educated at Westminster, and entered the Army from the Militia, 20 May 1899; was promoted Lieutenant 4 January 1901. He served in South Africa, 1899-1902; was in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; operations in the Orange Free State, April to May 1900; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 20 November 1900; operations in the Orange River Colony, May to July 1900, including actions at Lindley (1 June) and Rhenoster River; operations in Cape Colony, north and south of Orange River, 1899-1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to April 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, August 1901; operations in Cape Colony, September and October 1901, and May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches twice [London Gazette, 20 August 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal and King's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "John Bayford Wells, Lieutenant, The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was Adjutant of the 1st Battalion of his regiment, March 1906 to March 1909; was promoted Captain 5 May 1906; at the Staff College, Camberley, 1910-11; Staff Captain at the War Office 1 June 1912 to 25 January 1915. He took part in the European War, serving in France, Gallipoli and Egypt. He was DAAG, GHQ, France, and Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, 26 January to 13 July 1915 (Substantive Major 1 September 1915); AAG, GHQ, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force and Egyptian Expeditionary Force, 14 July 1915 to 16 April 1916, and was employed at the War Office as AAG 17 April 1916 to 30 November 1917, becoming Deputy Director of Organization, War Office, 1 December 1917, and receiving the rank of Temporary Brigadier General. He was given the Brevets of Major, April 1915; Lieutenant Colonel 3 June 1917, and Colonel 3 June 1919; was created a CMG in 1918; was mentioned in Despatches twice, and also received the Legion of Honour (Chevalier) and the White Eagle of Serbia, 3rd Class, with Swords. He married, in 1916, Arabella, daughter of William Walter Wright, and they had one son, Theodore John Macdonald, born 11 November 1918.
CMG, CBE (2nd m), DSO, QSA (4) Bel M-R OFS Trans (Lt, 1/LNL), KSA (2) (Lt, DSO, LNL), 1914-15 Star (Maj, DSO), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Lt Col), 1935 Jubilee, 1937 Coronation, Defence Medal, War Medal, Legion dHonneur (France) 4th Class, Order of the White Eagle (Serbia) 3rd Class with swords. Christies 1990 est £900-1,000. Neate 2002 £3,795.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Loyal North Lancashire Regiment
WhatmanAmherst BluntCaptainWHATMAN, AMHERST BLUNT, Captain, was born 8 January 1867. He was gazetted to the Somerset Light Infantry 4 May 1887, and became Lieutenant 4 January 1890. In 1897-98 he was present at operations on the North-West Frontier of India, with the Mohmand Field Force and the Peshawar Column, Tirah Expeditionary Force (Medal and two clasps). He was promoted to Captain 9 April 1898; and from 1899 to 1901 he served in the South African War, on the Staff, as Brigade Signalling Officer, 11 September 1900 to 11 June 1901, and was present at the operations in Natal, 1899; at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights, 14 to 27 February 1900; operations in the Orange Free State, April to May 1900; operations in the Transvaal in June 1900; operations in Natal, March to April 1900; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; operations in the Transvaal, 30 November 1900 to May 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, June to July 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Amherst Blunt Whatman, Captain, Somerset Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the Commander-in-Chief, South Africa, and the Insignia presented by the Lieutenant General Commanding the Forces, Punjab. Captain Whatman was Inspector of Army Signalling, India, 1 April 1904 to 31 March 1908. He again saw active service on the North-West Frontier of India in 1908, as Chief Signalling Officer, taking part in operations in the Zakka Khel country. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 22 May 1908], and was given the Brevet of Major 16 July 1908. He was promoted to Major, and retired in 1910 from the Somerset Light Infantry. Major Whatman married Myrtle Elen, daughter of Colonel H J Waller Barrow, and thev had one son. Major Whatman died 23 October 1913.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince Albert's) Somerset Light Infantry
WheelerHenry LittletonCaptainWHEELER, HENRY LITTLETON, Captain, was born 8 May 1863, at Bromwich House, Worcester, son of Honourable Canon T Littleton Wheeler and Catherine, daughter of Captain R Bradshaw, RN. He was educated privately, and joined the Worcestershire Militia in 1887 and entered the Hampshire Regiment, 9 April 1892; became Lieutenant 4 April 1894, and Captain 24 March 1900. He served in the South African War, 1900-2, taking part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Karee Siding, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria. He was attached to the ASC from 26 July 1901. Captain Wheeler took part in operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902, and on a third occasion]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Henry Littleton Wheeler, Captain, Hants Regiment. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". He retired from the Hampshire Regiment 4 April 1908, and became Secretary, Territorial Association, Staffordshire Regiment, in 1908. He was created a CB in 1918, and became Major, Reserve of Officers, 28 April 1914. Major Wheeler married, in November 1903, at Portsmouth, Vera, youngest daughter of Colonel Gillum Webb, of Walton House, Ashchurch, and of his wife, Florence, only daughter of General E Atlay, CB, and they had one son, Richard Littleton Wheeler, born in 1906, and a daughter, Elizabeth Littleton Wheeler, born in 1904.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Hampshire Regiment
WhighamRobert DundasMajorWHIGHAM, ROBERT DUNDAS, Major, was born 5 August 1865, son of David Dundas Whigham, of Prestwick, Ayrshire, NB, and Ellen Murray, youngest daughter of James Campbell, of Craigie, Ayrshire. He was educated at Fettes College, Edinburgh, and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and was gazetted to the 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, as Lieutenant, 9 May 1885; was Adjutant, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, 18 January 1892 to 17 January 1896, and was promoted to Captain 3 March 1892. He was employed with the Egyptian Army 29 December 1897 to 20 December 1898, and served in the Nile Expedition of 1898 with the 13th Sudanese Battalion, and was present at the battles of the Atbara and Khartoum (Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898]; Egyptian Medal with two clasps; Medal). He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, first as ADC to Major General Sir Hector Macdonald, KCB, commanding the Highland Brigade (6 February to 23 December 1900), and afterwards as DAAG at Army Headquarters 24 December 1900 to 16 October 1902. He was promoted to Major 1 August 1900. He took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, and Vet River (5 and 6 May); in Orange River Colony (May to 29 November 1900), including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July) and Witpoort; in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900; again in Cape Colony, north of Orange River, 1900; in the Transvaal, January 1901 to 31 May 1902; also during further operations in Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, December 1900 (Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; Queen's Medal with six clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps). He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Robert Dundas Whigham, Major, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. Major Whigham was Brigade Major, 2nd Army Corps, 1 November 1902 to 25 October 1904; DAAG, Headquarters of Army, 1 October 1906 to 2 February 1908, and 3 February 1908 to 15 April 1909; was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 3 February 1908, and to Colonel 4 October 1911; was GSO1, War Office, 10 April 1912 to 15 September 1914. He served in the European War from 1914, as GSO1, 2nd Division, BEF, 16 September to 26 December 1914; as Brigadier General, General Staff, 1st Army Corps, BEF, 27 December 1914 to 16 July 1915; as Sub-Chief of the General Staff, BEF, 17 July to 22 December 1915; Deputy Chief of the Imperial General Staff, War Office, 23 December 1915 to 28 April 1918; was promoted to Major General 1 January 1916; was Divisional Commander, 59th Division, BEF, 19 June to 26 August 1918; Divisional Commander, 62nd Division, BEF, 27 August 1918 to 31 March 1919; Divisional Commander, Light Division, British Army of the Rhine, 2 April 1919. He was twice mentioned in Despatches; created a CB in 1915; promoted to Major General; wounded; created a KCMG in 1919, and was made a Commander of the Legion of Honour. Sir Robert Whigham has been a Member of the Army Council since 1918. He married, in 1899, Isabel Adeline, youngest daughter of F A Muntz, of Rossmore, Leamington.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Warwickshire Regiment
WhiteFrederickMajorWHITE, FREDERICK, Major, was born 14 October 1861, son of Major George White, RMLI. He joined the Royal Marine Light Infantry 1 February 1879, and served in the Egyptian Expedition of 1882-84, taking part in the bombardment of Alexandria, occupation of the Lines of the town, occupation of Port Said (Medal with clasp; Bronze Star). He again saw active service in the Sudan in 1884, was present at the battles of El Teb and Tamai, and the relief of Tokar (two clasps; 5th Class Medjidie). He was promoted to Captain 26 August 1888; to Major 6 September 189G; was on the Staff, Royal Marines, 29 June 1896 to 12 February 1899. Major White served in the South African War 3 February 1900 to 13 April 1902, as Special Service Officer, including service as DAAG, Headquarters, Cape Town; Railway Staff Officer, Sterkstroom; Commandant, Bethulie Bridges, and District command under the Military Governor, Orange River Colony. He was present at operations in Orange River Colony, including the action at Wittebergen; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and for the defence of Ladybrand was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Frederick White, Major, Royal Marine Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Major White's defence of Ladybrand is described by Sir A Conan Doyle in his 'Great Boer War' (pages 377 and 378): "On September 2 another commando of Free State Boers under Fourie emerged from the mountain country on the Basuto border, and fell upon Ladybrand, which was held by a feeble garrison consisting of one company of the Worcester regiment and forty-three men of the Wiltshire Yeomanry. The Boers, who had several guns with them, appear to have been the same force which had been repulsed at Winburg. Major White, a gallant marine, whose fighting qualities do not seem to have deteriorated with his distance from salt water, had arranged his defences upon a hill, after the Wepener model, and held his own most stoutly. So great was the disparity of the forces that for days acute anxiety was felt lest another of those humiliating surrenders should interrupt the record of victories, and encourage the Boers to further resistance. The point was distant, and it was some time before relief could reach them. But the dusky chiefs, who from their native mountains looked down on the military drama which was played so close to their frontier, were again, as on the Jammersberg, to see the Boer attack beaten back by the constancy of the British defence. The thin line of soldiers, 150 of them covering a mile and a half of ground, endured a heavy shell and rifle fire with unshaken resolution, repulsed every attempt of the burghers, and held the flag flying until relieved by the forces under White and Bruce Hamilton". He became Lieutenant Colonel 11 April 1903; was given the Brevet of Colonel 11 April 1906, and retired with the rank of Colonel 11 April 1909. Colonel White was Draft Conducting Officer from 1915 to 1919 (three Medals).
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Marine Light Infantry
WhiteFrederick AlexanderLieutenantWHITE, FREDERICK ALEXANDER, Lieutenant, was born 6 August 1872. He entered the Suffolk Regiment 12 December 1894, becoming Lieutenant 24 February 1837. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, on the Staff, taking part in operations in the Orange Free State, April and May 1900; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including action at Pretoria; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Venterskroon (7 and 9 August); operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Ladybrand (5 September) and Bothaville; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900; operations in the Transvaal, February 1901 to 31 May 1902; operations in Cape Colony, August to September 1901, and May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to February 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Frederick Alexander White, Lieutenant, Suffolk Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 18 December 1902. He was promoted to Captain 14 October 1901; was Staff Captain, Mounted Infantry, 24 January 1901 to 25 June 1902; Adjutant, Volunteers, 30 June 1907 to 31 March 1908; Adjutant, Territorial Force, 1 April 1908 to 28 June 1912. He was Adjutant, Suffolk Regiment, 1 November 1903 to 31 October 1906; became Major 11 January 1914. Major White served in the European War from 1914, as Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, Suffolk Regiment, 29 June to 3 October 1915. He died in 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Suffolk Regiment
WhiteHenry FrederickLieutenant ColonelThe Hon. Henry Frederick White was born in 1859, son of the 2nd Baron Annaly. He was commissioned into the Grenadier Guards and served with them in the Soudan campaign of 1885. It was with Rhodesia, however, that the most active part of his career was associated. He was appointed Magistrate at Salisbury when that town was in its infancy, and then became Chief Commissioner of the British South Africa Company's Police. In 1899 he was Mayor of Bulawayo. His connection with Cecil Rhodes and the principal officers of the Chartered Company was intimate, and he accompanied Dr. Jameson on his famous raid into the Transvaal. For his share in that undertaking, in which he commanded the Mashonaland Mounted Police, he was sentenced to 5 month's imprisonment with hard labour and was deprived of his commission, but the War Office afterwards reinstated him. He subsequently threw in his lot with the mining industry. When the Boer War broke out, he at once returned to his old profession, commanding the colonial regiment with Colonel Plumer's force. He took part in the attack on the Boer fort at Gabarones on 12 February, 1900, and was wounded while caught in a wire entanglement. He recovered, however, in time to be present at the relief of Mafeking. During the latter part of the war he commanded a regiment of New Zealanders and took part in the great drives in the east of the Orange River Colony. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "H White, Lieutenant Colonel, British South Africa Police. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Colonel Harry White died of pneumonia at Pietersburg on 17 August 1903. Contemporary accounts described him as one of the most popular of the pioneers of Rhodesia and “above all things an honest English gentleman”
DSO, Egypt (1) Suakin 1885 (Lt Hon, 3/Gren Gds), QSA (4) RofM OFS Trans “Rhod (Lt Col Hon, Staff), KSA (2) (Lt Col Hon, Res of O), Khedives Star 1884-86. Romsey 1986 £2,150. DNW Dec 95 £2,100. Spink 1999 £4,000.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
British South Africa Police
WhiteJames RobertLieutenantWHITE, JAMES ROBERT, Lieutenant, was born 22 May 1879, son of Field Marshal Sir George White and of Lady White, nee Amy Baly. He was educated at Winchester. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as Lieutenant, Gordon Highlanders. He was present at Kimberley, including action at Magersfontein; took part, in operations in the Orange Free State, including operations at Paardeberg; fought in actions at Poplar Grove; Driefontein; Vet River; was present in the Transvaal, May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; took part in operations in Cape Colony, March 1901, and in the Orange River Colony, April to June 1901; in operations in the Transvaal. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 2 July 1901]; awarded the Queen's Medal and five clasps; King's Medal and two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 2 July 1901]: "James Robert White, Lieutenant, The Gordon Highlanders. For having, when taken prisoner, owing to mistaking advancing Boers for British troops, and stripped, escaped from custody and run six miles, warning Colonel de Lisle, and advancing with him to relief of Major Sladen's force". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented by Major Sladen, Officer Commanding 6th Regiment Mounted Infantry, about March 1902. Details from letter from Captain J R White: "Awarded Distinguished Service Order for bringing up relief to a detached force attacked by Boers, having found his way to main column after being taken prisoner and released by Boers". He resigned his commission in 1908, impressed with the truth of the Tolstoyan position. He says he has since been "identified with the Irish and Socialist Revolutionary movements, and is a convinced believer in Communist principles". Captain White married, 24 April 1907, Mercedes (Dolly), daughter of Alexander Mosley, partner in the banking firm of Thomas Mosley & Co, Gibraltar.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Gordon Highlanders
Page 56 of 59
<<First <Prev 54 5556 57 58 Next> Last>>