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 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
StewartAlgernon Bingham AnstrutherCaptainSTEWART, ALGERNON BINGHAM ANSTRUTHER, Captain, was born 6 December 1869, eldest son of Colonel O E Stewart, CB. He was gazetted to the Seaforth Highlanders as Second Lieutenant 29 November 1890, and became Lieutenant 1 June 1893. In that year he served with the Chitral Relief Force; was present at the action at Marnagair (Medal with clasp). He was promoted Captain 30 August 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, taking part in the Advance on Kimberley, including the action at Magersfontein; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 2G February); actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein; operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in the Transvaal, March to August 1901, and March to 31 May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to January 1901, and January to March 1902; operations in Cape Colony, February to March 1901, and August 1901 to January 1902. He was Commandant at Fauresmith. Captain Stewart was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Algernon Bingham Anstruther Stewart, Captain, Seaforth Highlanders. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 18 December 1912. He was Adjutant, Militia, 1 June 1903 to 21 February 1908; was promoted to Major 22 February 1908. He served in the European War, and became GSO 2, 1 November 1915. On 23 May 1916, he was killed in action. In 1911, he married Edith Evelyn, daughter of Sir Arthur Vivian.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Duke of Albany's Ross-shire Buffs) Seaforth Highl
StewartBryceMajorSTEWART, BRYCE, Major, was born 18 June 1857, son of Bryce Stewart, of Rothesay, Scotland. He joined the Royal Munster Fusiliers as Second Lieutenant 8 August 1879. He served in the Burmese Expedition, 1885-1888, and received the Medal with two clasps. He next saw active service in South Africa. 1899-1902, and served on the Staff (as Brigade Major, Infantry Brigade, 23 March 1900 to 26 January 1901); he was afterwards Commandant at Bronkhurst Spruit from 29 June 1901, and at Orange River from 30 October 1901; he took part in the advance on Kimberley, including action at Belmont; during operations in the Transvaal, east and west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; during operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Lindley (26 June), Bethlehem (6 and 7 July), Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); during operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900; in the operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River. Taking part in the operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to July 1901; operations in Cape Colony, July 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], and received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Bryce Stewart, Major, Royal Munster Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to Lord Kitchener, and presented by Colonel Garston at Kimberley 16 May 1902. He was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 23 July 1905, and received the Brevet of Colonel 23 July 1908, and retired 23 July 1909. Colonel Stewart married, in 1891, Georgie Gholson, daughter of Norman S Walter, of Staten Island, New York.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Munster Fusiliers
StewartWilliam Edmond LoganCaptainSTEWART, WILLIAM EDMOND LOGAN, Captain, was born 8 October 1873, at Rhosygilwin, Cilgerran, South Wales, son of Captain James Stewart, of the Madras Horse Artillery, of Allyrodyn, Llandyssil, South Wales, JP and DL for County Cardigan, and of Louisa Charlotte, daughter of William Butler, Madras Army. He was educated at Winchester, and was gazetted to the Welsh Regiment 29 May 1895, becoming Lieutenant 3 February 1898. He served throughout the South African Campaign, 1899-1902, with the 1st Mounted Infantry from October 1899 to December 1901, first in command of Maxim guns, and later in command of a company and Maxims. He was present at the Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Sanna's Post, and at the advances on Brandfort, Zand River, Vet River, Johannesburg and Diamond Hill; at the operations southeast of Pretoria: the advance on Middelburg (Transvaal); Belfast, and advance on Komati Poort. He was later with Colonel Williams' Column pursuing Kritzinger, De Wet and others in Cape Colony and Orange River Colony. After January to the end of the war he was ADC to General Sir E A H Alderson, CB, ADC, Commanding the Mounted Infantry in South Africa. He was mentioned three times in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "William Edmond Logan Stewart, Captain, The Welsh Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted to Captain 22 January 1902. He left the Army 2 May 1906, on retired pay, and joined the Pembrokeshire Yeomanry. Major Stewart mobilized with the Pembrokeshire Yeomanry at the beginning of the European War, but was invalided out owing to a badly broken skull 9 April 1916. Major Stewart formerly hunted and played polo, but has had to give up these pursuits as his wounds prevent him from riding. He used to shoot and was fond of fishing. On 30 January 1908, at Tilmanstone, Kent, he married Mary Adela Morland Rice, daughter of Major C A Rice, RE, of Danefield House, Eastry, Kent, and their children were: John Logan, born 16 May 1911, and Mary Elizabeth.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Welsh Regiment
StirlingGeorge Murray HomeCaptainSTIRLING, SIR GEORGE MURRAY HOME, Captain, Baronet, of Glorat, was born at 16, Bryanston Square, London, 4 September 1869, son of Sir Charles Elphinstone Fleming Stirling, 8th Baronet, of Glorat (Nova Scotia Baronetcy, 1666), formerly Highland Borderers Militia, JP and DL for Stirlingshire, and of Anne Georgina, eldest daughter of James Murray. He was educated at Eton College, and the RMC, Sandhurst; joined the 2nd Essex Regiment (56th Foot, The Pompadours) as Second Lieutenant 9 November 1889; became Lieutenant 7 October 1892; served in the Chitral Campaign, 1895 (Medal and clasp); in the Tirah Campaign, 1897-98 (as Transport Officer); operations against the Khani Khel Chamkaiiis; operations in the Bazar Valley 25-30 December 1897 (two clasps). He became Captain 29 January 1900. He served in the South African Campaign, 1899-1902; from January to June 1900, as Adjutant, Burma Mounted Infantry. He took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, March to May 1900, including the actions of Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain,) Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River. Also in the operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, 1 August to October 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, June to 31 July 1900; operations in Transvaal till wounded in September 1900; operations in the Transvaal, January to April 1901. He served as Staff Captain, Mounted Infantry Brigade, from 18 October 1900 to 18 February 1902, and was afterwards attached to the Army Service Corps as Officer Commanding Transport, Bloemfontein District, till June 1902, when he returned to England. The following is an extract from C S Goldmann's 'With General French and the Cavalry in South Africa', which gives a good account of the engagement at Sanna's Post, for which Sir George Stirling afterwards received the DSO: "Reduced to ten men (seven gunners, one sergeant, one corporal and a bombardier), and himself the sole officer left with the battery, Major Hornby had to call volunteers to rescue the guns. The appeal was responded to by Captain Humphreys, who was close by, by Lieutenant Stirling (2nd Essex), Burma Mounted Infantry, by Lieutenant Maxwell (18th Bengal Lancers), attached to Roberts's Horse, and a number of privates showed equal alacrity in lending help. Five of the men by themselves working with a will arranged to drag the two guns on the left a distance of 50 yards to a point behind the Station buildings, and the two on the outside were hauled by ten non-commissioned officers and gunners 100 yards to the shelter of a camp close up the line; the limbers also had to be brought up by manual effort. Singling out the middle gun, the Boers poured on it an unmeasured fire till it seemed as if nothing could live under such a fury of shell and bullet. The five dauntless men resumed the attempt at rescue by hand, but their strength was exhausted, and they had to turn to the horses that were standing in poor shelter behind a tin shed at the station. Four of the animals were brought forward in pairs only to be shot down. Another pair met the same fate. A gunner went out with each pair to hook in, while the driver held the horses. It was observed that when the men emerged from the shelter of the buildings, they bent their heads towards the direction from which the bullets were coming, as if they were withstanding a storm of hail. There had been 87 horses under the shelter of the shed; 85 were killed or disabled, and upon the remaining two animals depended the fate of the guns. Several bullets dropped hard by these two animals, throwing up dust to their middles, but the whizzing of the lead scarcely seemed to frighten them. They were with the utmost haste hitched up to the limber, and Lieutenant Stirling proceeded to back them to the gun. The short space of a single yard separated the trail from the limber hook; one instant more and they would have plunged forward bearing the gun away into safety, but it was not to be. A few Boer muzzles, with unerring aim, snatched away the success that seemed so nearly assured and so richly deserved. Both horses were shot through the eyes and dropped dead. Driver Glasock was wounded at the same moment, and the last gun stood hopelessly derelict. All means of rescue had been exhausted and the gun must be abandoned". Sir George Stirling was wounded at Zandfontein. For his services in the South African War he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; received the Queen's South African Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Sir George Murray Home Stirling, Captain, Essex Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Served Somaliland FF 1903-4, and commanded the 7th Somali Camel Corps from 12 November 1903 to June 1904, taking part in operations in Somaliland and receiving the Medal and clasp. He succeeded to the Baronetcy 10 September 1910; was appointed DAAG, Mhow Division, India, 13 January 1911, which appointment he vacated in November 1914, in order to join his regiment in France. He had become Major on 12 February 1912. After the outbreak of the European War he was appointed Provost-Marshal to the 9th Army Corps 29 December 1914 to 15 November 1915, and Temporary Lieutenant Colonel 16 November 1915, on getting command of the 2nd Essex Regiment. He was Commandant, Lines of Communication, British Armies in France, from 3 October 1918, and Temporary Colonel from 1 October 1918. He was wounded, and thrice mentioned in Despatches in 1915, 1917, and again in 1918, besides receiving a Brevet Lieutenant Colonelcy 1 January 1918. Sir George Stirling was a member of the King's Bodyguard of Scotland, and a JP and DL for Stirlingshire. Sir George Stirling married, 4 November 1904, at St Andrews, Fife, Mabel Elizabeth, second daughter of Colonel Sir Alexander Sprot, Baronet, CMG, of Garnkirk and Stravithie, late of the Carabiniers (served in Afghan, South African and European Wars). They had two sons: Charles Alexander Sprot Home, born 3 April 1910; George Archibald Mmigo, born 10 March 1915, and two daughters, Elizabeth Gloriana and Jean Margaret.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Essex Regiment
StirlingJohn GordonLieutenantSTIRLING, JOHN GORDON, Lieutenant, was born 28 May 1874, son of the Right Honourable Sir James Stirling, LLD, FRS, PC, late Lord Justice of Appeal, and Aby, eldest daughter of John Thomson Renton, of Bradstone Brook, Shalford, Surrey. He joined the Lancers, as Second Lieutenant, from the Militia, 31 July 1895, and became Lieutenant, 9th Lancers, July 1896. He served in the South African War, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "John Gordon Stirling, Lieutenant, 9th Lancers (since deceased). In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to Lord Justice Stirling.
DSO, QSA (3) Bel OFS Trans (Lt), KSA (2) (Lt & Adj, 9 Lancers). March 1980 £695. Sothebys 1980 £1,000.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
9th (The Queen's Royal) Lancers
StirlingWalter FrancisLieutenantSTIRLING, WALTER FRANCIS, Captain, was born 31 Jan 1880, at Portsmouth, Hampshire, son of Captain Francis Stirling, RN, and Mrs Frances Stirling, of Hampton Court Palace. He was educated at Kelly College and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and joined the 1st Royal Dublin Fusiliers as Second Lieutenant 11 February 1899; became Lieutenant 16 December 1899. He served with the Natal Field Force in South Africa with his regiment; with the 4th Division, Mounted Infantry, in Dundonald's Brigade; was afterwards appointed Adjutant, 14th Battalion Mounted Infantry. He took part in the Relief of Ladysmith; was present during operations in the Transvaal in June 1900; operations in Natal (March to June 1900), including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Belfast (20 and 27 August); in Orange River Colony (June 1900), and again in the Transvaal, December 1900 to May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 28 January 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. The Distinguished Service Order was specially awarded in Army Orders [London Gazette, 28 January 1902]: "Walter Francis Stirling, Lieutenant, The Royal Dublin Fusiliers. For skill and gallantry in action at Kafferspruit 19 December 1901". He was invested by the King 18 December 1902. He joined the Egyptian Army 22 August 1906; was promoted Captain 21 June 1908, and retired from the Service 20 January 1912; was Secretary of the Khedival Sporting Club, Cairo. At the outbreak of the European War Captain Stirling was gazetted Observer in the Royal Flying Corps in Egypt. He afterwards rejoined the 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers, 29th Division, in Gallipoli, as Second-in-Command, in April 1915. He was appointed GSO2, Intelligence, GHQ, Egypt, 1916, and afterwards GSO2 to 52nd Lowland Division. He served on the General Staff until 1918; was promoted Major, Reserve of Officers, 18 January 1917; became Deputy Chief Political Officer, Egypt and Syria. For his services in the European War Major Stirling was mentioned in Despatches, and was awarded the Military Cross and a Bar to the DSO.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Dublin Fusiliers
StockwellGeorge Clifton InglisCaptainSTOCKWELL, GEORGE CLIFTON INGLIS, Captain, was born 24 July 1863, son of Major General C M Stockwell, CB. He was gazetted to the Wiltshire Regiment 9 September 1882, as Lieutenant; was transferred to the Highland Light Infantry 21 October 1882; was Adjutant, Highland Light Infantry, 18 February 1885 to 17 February 1890; was Brigade Major, Chitral Relief Force, 20 March to 21 September 1895. He took part in the operations in Chitral, 1895, with the Relief Force (on Staff). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 15 November 1895 (Medal with clasp). From 3 February to 30 September 1900, he was on Special Service in South Africa; from 1 October 1900 to 5 July 1902, he was Brigade Major, South Africa. During the South African War he took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; also in Orange River Colony (May to 29 November 1900), including actions at Wittebergen and Witpoort; again in Orange River Colony 30 November to December 1900; also during operations in Cape Colony, December 1900 to April 1901 (Despatches, [London Gazette 17 June 1902]; Queen's Medal with two clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps). He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "George Clifton Inglis Stockwell, Captain, Highland Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Captain Stockwell was invested by the King 24 October 1902. He was promoted to Major 9 August 1902; passed the Staff College; was Brigade Major, 12th Brigade, Southern Command, 17 October 1903 to 1 December 1904. He became Lieutenant Colonel 4 November 1907, and Colonel 30 August 1911. He served in the European War, as Brigade Commander up to 24 January 1915; as Divisional Commander from 25 January 1915. He retired 6 July 1917; was created a CMG in 1918, and given the honorary rank of Major General 18 March 1919. General Stockwell married, in 1900, Muriel Evelyn Maitland, youngest daughter of Richard Cochrane, of Calder Glen, County Lanark.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Highland Light Infantry
StokesAlfredMajorSTOKES, ALFRED, Major, was born 14 October 1860, son of Lieutenant General Sir John Stokes, KCB, of Ewell, Surrey, and Henrietta Georgina de Villiers (who died in 1893), second daughter of Charles Maynard, of Grahamstown, Cape of Good Hope. He was educated at Cheltenham, and joined the Royal Artillery, as a Lieutenant, 18 February 1880, serving in South Africa in 1881; in the Bechuanaland Expedition 23 December 1884 to 12 March 1885, and was honourably mentioned in Despatches. He became Captain 25 April 1888, and Major 25 December 1897. Major Stokes served in the South African War from 1899 to 1900; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action of Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 1900, and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in the Transvaal, May and June 1900; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River, including action at Ruidam. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Alfred Stokes, Major, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 3 June 1901. He became Lieutenant Colonel 14 November 1905; was given the Brevet of Colonel 14 November 1908, and was promoted to Colonel 14 November 1910. Colonel Stokes was Temporary Brigadier General, commanding Royal Artillery in India, from 22 December 1911, and served in the European War from 1914; was mentioned in Despatches, and created a CB in 1915, and a CMG in 1916. He retired from the Staff 2 September 1918, with the rank of Brigadier General. Brigadier General Stokes married, in 1891, Margaret Dunbar, daughter of Sir James Laing, of Etal Manor, Northumberland.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
StreatfeildEricCaptainSTREATFEILD, ERIC, Captain, was born 6 February 1864; he was gazetted Lieutenant in the Gordon Highlanders, from the Militia, 28 April 1886; was ADC to the GOC, Militia, Canada, 8 May 1890 to 30 June 1890, and 5 December 1890 to 31 August 1895; became Captain, 1 September 1896, and Adjutant, Gordon Highlanders, 18 November 1897. He served in the South African War; was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Eric Streatfeild, Captain, Gordon Highlanders. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. Captain Streatfeild died 26 May 1902.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Gordon Highlanders
StrongCharles PowlettLieutenantSTRONG, CHARLES POWLETT, Lieutenant, was born 9January 1875, son of Lieutenant Colonel C J Strong. He was gazetted to the Bedfordshire Regiment on 6 March 1895, and became Lieutenant 10 July 1897. He served in the South African War, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Charles Powlett Strong, Lieutenant, Bedfordshire Regiment (deceased). Lieutenant Strong was killed before his decoration was gazetted, and the Insignia, etc, were sent to his father.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bedfordshire Regiment
Stuart-WortleyAlan Richard MontaguCaptainSTUART-WORTLEY, THE HONOURABLE ALAN RICHARD MONTAGU, Captain, was born 20 January 1868, son of the Honourable F P Stuart-Wortley (second son of the 2nd Baron Wharncliffe) and of the eldest daughter of William Bennet Martin, of Worsborough Hall, Yorkshire. He was a brother of the 2nd Earl of Wharncliffe. He was educated at Wellington College, and was gazetted to the King's Royal Rifle Corps as Second Lieutenant 5 November 1887; became Lieutenant 16 April 1890; was Adjutant, KRRC, 11 March 1895 to 10 March 1899. He became Captain 11 March 1895. He served in the Chitral Campaign in 1895, with the Relief Force, and was present at the storming of the Malakand Pass (Medal with clasp). Captain Stuart-Wortley served in the South African War, 1899-1900, taking part in operations in Natal, 1899, including the action of Talana (severely wounded) and Lombard's Kop. He took part in the Defence of Ladysmith; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and for his services in the Battle of Talana was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "The Honourable Alan Richard Montagu Stuart-Wortley, Captain, King's Royal Rifle Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He became Major 4 May 1904; passed the Staff College; was General Staff Officer, 3rd Grade, Headquarters of Army, 8 August 1904 to 14 October 1907; GSO, 2nd Grade, Headquarters of Army, 15 October 1907 to 7 August 1908; Lieutenant Colonel 15 October 1910, and Colonel 15 June 1914; Assistant Director of Movements 1 April 1914 to 28 January 1915. He served in the European War from 1914; was Director of Movements, War Office, 29 January 1915 to 24 January 1917; was created a CB, 1915, and commanded the 4th Battalion King's Royal Rifles; commanded the 68th Infantry Brigade, British Armies in France, 27 February to 30 March 1917; commanded the 19th Division, British Armies in France, 7 April to 24 May 1917, and the 32nd Division, British Armies in France, 25 May to 19 June 1917. Major General Stuart-Wortley was DQMG Mesopotamia Expeditionary Force, 18 August 1917 to 3 April 1919; Major General in Charge of Administration, Southern Command, from 1 June 1919. He was created a CB in 1915; was specially promoted Major General 1 January 1917; was created a KCMG in 1918. Sir Alan Stuart-Wortley was an Officer of the Legion of Honour, and has the Ordre de la Couronne (Belgium). He married, in 1900, the Honourable Maud Julia Mary Winn, daughter of the 1st Baron St Oswald, and they had one son and one daughter.
KCB (m), KCMG, DSO, IGS 1895 RofC, QSA (3) CC Tal RofL, BWM, Victory Medal, 1911 Delhi Durbar, 1935 Jubilee, 1937 Coronation, Legion dHonneur (France) 3rd Class, Order of the Crown (Belgium) 3rd Class, Order of the Crown (Italy) 3rd Class. Regimental Museum, Winchester 1996.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Royal Rifle Corps
StuddHerbert WilliamCaptainSTUDD, HERBERT WILLIAM, Captain, was born 26 December 1870, son of Edward Studd, of Tidworth House, Wilts, and 2 Hyde Park Gardens, London. He was educated at Eton, and Trinity College, Cambridge, and entered the Coldstream Guards 25 July 1891, becoming Lieutenant 2 January 1897, and Captain 11 February 1900. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to October 1900, including action at Belfast; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900; operations in the Transvaal, November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, December 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Herbert William Studd, Captain, Coldstream Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 18 December 1902. Captain Studd was DAAG, London District, 27 November 1905 to 26 November 1909; was promoted to Major 24 June 1908; was GSO2, War Office, 1 April 1912 to 4 August 1914. He served in the European War, 1914-18, as GSO2, 1st Army Corps, BEF, 5 August to 16 September 1914; commanded the 19th Reserve Infantry Brigade, Home Forces, 23 October 1915 to 2 January 1916, and the 180th Infantry Brigade, Home Forces; British Armies in France 3 January to 8 November 1916; became Lieutenant Colonel 3 September 1916; was Brigadier-General, General Staff, 11th Army Corps, British Armies in France, 9 November 1916 to 4 December 1917; was Brigadier General, General Staff, Supreme War Council, Versailles, 3 December 1917 to June 1918. He was dangerously wounded, and for his services in the European War was mentioned in Despatches; given the Brevet of Colonel 3 June 1917; created a CMG in 1917, and a CB in 1918. He married, in 1894, Mary, daughter of Major Horace de Vere, of Curragh Chase, County Limerick, and of his wife, Mrs Maxwell, of Issercleran, County Galway, and they had two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Coldstream Guards
SurteesHerbert ConyersLieutenant ColonelSURTEES, HERBERT CONYERS, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 13 January 1858, only son of Colonel C F Surtees, DL, JP, late 10th Hussars, of Nainsforth Hall, Ferryhill, and MP for South Durham, 1865-68, and of Bertha, daughter of N S Chauncy, of Green End, Hertfordshire. He was educated at Sandhurst; entered the 49th Foot 11 September 1876; became Second Lieutenant, Coldstream Guards, 31 October 1877; Lieutenant, Army, 11 September 1876; Coldstream Guards, 31 October 1877; Instructor of Musketry, Coldstream Guards, 1 February 1882 to 31 March 1883. He was employed with the Egyptian Army 23 February 1884 to 12 June 1887, and served in the Nile Expedition, 1884-85, in command of the Turkish Mounted Infantry of the Egyptian Army, and afterwards of a boat convoy, receiving the Medal with clasp, the Bronze Star, and the 4th Class Medjidie. In 1885-86 he again saw active service in the Sudan with the Frontier Field Force, taking part in the action of Giniss, in command of the 3rd Camel Corps, Egyptian Army. He was promoted to Captain 7 May 1887; to Major 5 February 1895. He passed the Staff College. Major Surtees was DAAG, Southern District, 1 July 1897 to 30 January 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, in command of the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards (23 March to 14 December 1900), taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Driefontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Herbert Conyers Surtees, Lieutenant Colonel, Coldstream Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 29 October 1901. He became Lieutenant Colonel 3 October 1900; was given the Brevet of Colonel 10 February 1904; was Military Attache, Constantinople and Athens, 15 August 1905 to 1909 (Cross of the Grand Commander of St Saviour of Greece); was created a CB in 1906 and a MVO in the same year, and retired 14 August 1912. During the European War General Surtees commanded the 52nd Infantry Brigade in France and Belgium (1915-16), and was an Inspector of Infantry in 1916; was twice mentioned in Despatches; given the honorary rank of Brigadier General 12 April 1917, and created a CMG in 1919. He was an FSA and an FHGS, and was Lord of the Manor of Mainsforth; was County Commissioner for Boy Scouts, County Durham, Deputy Lieutenant and a Justice of the Peace. General Surtees was been MP for Gateshead from 1918. He married, in 1887, Madeline Augusta (Mrs Surtees has the Turkish Order of the Chefaket), daughter of Edward Crabbe, and they had two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Coldstream Guards
SuttonAlexander ArthurMajorSUTTON, ALEXANDER ARTHUR, Major, was born 30 November 1861. He took his degree, LRCP, at Edinburgh, and entered the Army (Royal Army Medical Corps) in 1885, and became Major 1 August 1897. He served during operations in Sierra Leone, 1898 to 1899, in the Protectorate Expedition, and was severely wounded; received Medal with clasp. He again saw active service in South Africa, 1899-1902, taking part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1903, including operations at Paardeberg 17 to 26 February (slightly wounded); actions at Poplar Grove, Karee Siding, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; during operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June), and in the Transvaal operations of August to 29 November 1900. Taking part in the operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April 1901], and received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Alexander Arthur Sutton, Major, Royal Army Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to Lord Roberts 18 January 1902, and were presented by Major General G Barton, CB, in South Africa. He was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 1 August 1905. He served during the European War; became Colonel 1 March 1915, and Temporary Surgeon General 3 August 1916 to 25 December 1917, and was promoted Major General 26 December 1917. He was commandant, Royal Army Medical Corps, School of Instruction, and OC, Depot, 20 September 1913 to 3 October 1915; Deputy Director of Medical Services, Lines of Communication, Salonika Army, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force; British Salonika Force, 11 November 1915 to 14 May 1917. He was created a CB in 1917. Major General Sutton married (1st), in 1887, Annie, eldest daughter of General H F Dunsford, CB; they had two sons and two daughters. He married (secondly), 1917, Mary Wilson, RRC.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
SwayneOswald RocheSecond LieutenantSWAYNE, OSWALD ROCKE, Second Lieutenant, was born 25 September 1879, sixth son of R A Swayne, of Tillington Court, near Hereford. He joined the Army, as a Second Lieutenant in the Royal Artillery, 20 May 1899, and was promoted Lieutenant 16 February 1901. He served in the South African War from 1899 to 1902, being present in operations in the Orange Free State, April to May 1900, including actions at Yet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in Orange River Colony, June to 29 November 1900, including action at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900; operations in the Transvaal, July and December 1901; operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; awarded the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Oswald Roche Swayne, Second Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. He became Captain 15 March 1906; was Adjutant, Royal Artillery, 1 June 1911 to 31 May 1914, and was promoted Major 30 October 1914. He served in the European War, 1914-17 and 1918-19; was from July 1917 to August 1918, Major Instructor in the Gunnery School of Instruction for Siege and Heavy Artillery, Lydd. He was mentioned in Despatches, and was awarded the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1919; and was wounded. Lieutenant Colonel Swayne married, in 1904, Brenda, youngest daughter of Arthur Butler, of Brooklyn, Chislehurst, Kent, and has four sons and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Garrison Artillery
SwettenhamGeorge KilnerCaptainSWETTENHAM, GEORGE KILNER, Captain, was born 7 June 1866, son of George Fletcher Swettenham, of South Lodge, Eastbourne. He was educated at Cheltenham College; entered the Army in November 1886; was promoted Captain in April 1896. Lieutenant Colonel Swettenham served in South Africa, 1899-1901. He was present at the actions at Colenso, Pieter's Hill, Tugela Heights and Monte Cristo; took part in the Relief of Ladysmith under Sir Redvers Buller; also taking part in the operations in Cape Colony and in Bechuanaland (Relief of Mafeking). He was present at the action at Rooidam, under Sir A Hunter; took part in the operations in the Eastern Transvaal, subsequent to the occupation of Pretoria; was also present at the actions at Witpoort and Oliphantsfontein. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], received the Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "George Kilner Swettenham, Captain, Royal Irish Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He retired from the Army in November 1906; joined the 3rd Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers in 1913, as Major, and was appointed to Command the 5th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles (Royal South Down Militia) 1 December 1915, becoming substantive Lieutenant Colonel in April 1917. He was twice mentioned in Despatches during the European War, and created a CBE. Lieutenant Colonel Swettenham married, in November 1904, Catherine Anne Eleanor, eldest daughter of Very Reverend Augustine FitzGerald, Dean of Armagh, and they had one son, Kilner, born 1 August 1910, and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Princess Victoria's) Royal Irish Fusiliers
SwintonErnest DunlopCaptainSWINTON, ERNEST DUNLOP, Captain, was born 21 October 1868. He was educated at Rugby and Cheltenham, and was gazetted to the Royal Engineers 17 February 1888, becoming Lieutenant 17 February 1891. He was Assistant Inspector, School of Military Engineering, 3 November 1896 to 10 November 1899; became Captain 17 February 1899. Captain Swinton served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as Adjutant, 1st Battalion Railway Pioneer Regiment (from 22 December 1899); afterwards in command of the 1st Battalion Railway Pioneer Regiment from 15 November 1900; operations in the Orange Free State, April to May 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to September 1900; operations in the Transvaal, September to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, November 1899 to April 1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Ernest Dunlop Swinton, Captain, Royal Engineers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested with the Insignia by the King 18 December 1902. He was promoted to Major 31 December 1906; was Chief Instructor, RMA, 1 February 1907 to 8 September 1910; Secretary, Historical Section, Committee of Imperial Defence, 30 September 1910 to 30 September 1913; Assistant Secretary, Committee of Imperial Defence, 1 October 1913 to 4 August 1914. He served in the European War from 1914, as Deputy Director of Railway Transport, British Expeditionary Force, 5 August to 8 September 1914; as GSO2, GHQ, BEF, 9 September 1914 to 18 July 1915; was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 6 May 1915; was GSO1, whilst employed as Assistant Secretary. Committee of Imperial Defence, 19 July 1915 to 18 March 1916; Commander, Heavy Section, Machine Gun Corps, 19 March to 8 November 1916. He was given the Brevet of Colonel 1 January 1917; was employed under the Ministry of Munitions 14 August to 17 November 1918; Temporary Major General 3 January 1918; employed under the Ministry of Labour 18 November 1918; Controller of Inspection Department of Civil Aviation. For his services in the European War he was mentioned three times in Despatches; was created a CB in 1917; given the Brevet of Colonel, and made a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour. He had to do with the evolution of the Tank. He journeyed through the United States, speaking about the War, in 1918. Under the pseudonym, 'Ole-Luk-Oie' he wrote 'Green Curve' in 1909. He wrote 'The Defence of Duffer's Drift' in 1904, under the pseudonym of 'Backright-Forethought'. In 1915 he wrote 'The Great Tab Dope', and in 1916, 'A Year Ago'. He married, in 1897, Grace Louisa, second daughter of Sir Edward G Clayton, and they had two sons and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
TagartHarold Arthur LewisMajorTAGART, HAROLD ARTHUR LEWIS, Major, was born 20 June 1870, at Old Sneyd Park, Gloucestershire, son of Francis Tagart, JP, DL, of Old Sneyd Park, Gloucestershire, and 199 Queen's Gate, London, and of Isabella Ongley Hopson, daughter of Captain Ongley Hopson, 23rd Light Dragoons. He was educated at Eton, and at Trinity College, Cambridge; was gazetted to the 15th Hussars, as Second Lieutenant, 3 December 1890; became Lieutenant 25 May 1892, and Captain 13 June 1896; was ADC to HRH the Duke of Connaught, GOC at Aldershot, 1897. He served in the South African War, as Brigade Major, Cavalry Brigade, 19 February 1900 to 30 August 1901; was promoted to Major 17 September 1900. He was present at the operations in the Orange Free State, May 1900, including actions at Hout Nek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal, May and June 1900, including action near Johannesburg. Operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900. He was invalided home with enteric fever. For his services in this campaign he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Harold Arthur Lewis Tagart, Major, 15th Hussars. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 3 June 1901. He was Brigade Major, Cavalry Brigade, Aldershot, 21 December 1901 to 30 September 1902; was DAAG, Presidency District, Calcutta, 2 July 1904; Brigade Major, Meerut Cavalry Brigade, 20 February 1905 to 1 November 1906. Major Tagart was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 10 October 1911. From 1914 he served in the European War; as DA and QMG, Cavalry Corps, from 10 October 1914; Temporary Brigadier General from 10 October 1914 to 24 October 1915, commanding a brigade on the Aisne, and became Major General 25 October 1915. He was made a Commander of the Legion of Honour, and was created a CB in 1915; was DA and QMG, 3rd Army, 1915 and 1916, and was invalided home in 1916; DAG, Home Forces, 1916 to 1918, when he was again invalided. He retired 18 March 1919. Major General Tagart was created a KCMG in 1918; mentioned in Despatches five times. Sir H A L Tagart's favourite recreations were farming, hunting and shooting. He married (1st), in 1900, Lady Mary Stuart Keppel (who died in 1908), sixth daughter of the 7th Earl of Albemarle, and (secondly), in 1908, Josephine Mary Charlotte, daughter of Hubert Washington Hibbert.
KCB (m), KCMG, DSO, IGS 1895 (1) RofC, QSA (3) CC Tal RofL, BWM, Victory Medal, 1911 Delhi Durbar, 1935 Jubilee, 1937 Coronation, Legion dHonneur (France) 3rd Class, Order of the Crown (Belgium) 3rd Class, Order of the Crown (Italy) 3rd Class. Regimental Museum, Winchester 1996.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
15th (The King's) Hussars
TalbotFrederick GilbertCaptainTALBOT, FREDERICK GILBERT, Captain, was born in 1868, son of Colonel the Honourable Sir W P M Chetwynd-Talbot, eighth son of the 2nd Earl Talbot and Lady Emma Charlotte Stanley, daughter of the 14th Earl of Derby. He was educated at Wellington; entered the Army 21 December 1888; was promoted Lieutenant 18 November 1891, and Captain 18 March 1896. Captain Talbot served in the South African War, 1899 to 1902, and was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz, where he was wounded; operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 1900, and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 27 October 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Frederick Gilbert Talbot, Captain, Rifle Brigade. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 24 October 1902. At the conclusion of the war, Captain Talbot served on the Compensation Board. He was promoted Major 7 September 1904, and retired 6 May 1908; became Honorary Lieutenant Colonel in 1908; Lieutenant Colonel in 1913. Lieutenant Colonel Talbot was given command of the 5th Battalion Rifle Brigade. He was a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, and wrote the 'Memoirs of Baber'.
DSO, QSA (5) CC T-H RofL Trans L-N (Capt, RB), KSA (2) (Capt, DSO, RB). Sothebys 1988 est £500-700.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince Consort's Own) Rifle Brigade
TalbotLord Edmund BernardLieutenant ColonelTALBOT, LORD EDMUND BERNARD, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 1 June, 1855, son of the 17th Duke of Norfolk and Augusta Mary Hinna Catherine, second daughter of Edmund, 1st Lord Lyons. He was educated at the Oratory School, Edgbaston, and joined the 11th Hussars, as Second Lieutenant, from the Militia 20 November 1875. In 1876 he took the name of Talbot, in lieu of Howard, by Royal License on inheriting under the will of Bertram, Earl of Shrewsbury. Lord Edmund was Adjutant, 11th Hussars, from 24 August 1881 to 14 August 1883; became Captain 14 September 1881; was Adjutant, Auxiliary Forces, 15 August 1883 to 31 August 1888; became Major, 11th Hussars, 19 November 1891. He served in the South African War, on Special Service, from 21 October 1899, to 19 February 1900. On the Staff (as DAAG) 20 February to 28 September 1900. He took part in the Relief of Kimberley, and in the operations in the Orange Free State, including operations at Paardeberg, actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein. Operations in the Transvaal, May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill. Operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including actions at Colesberg. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Lord Edmund Bernard Talbot, Lieutenant Colonel (half-pay). In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 3 June, 1901. He was created an MVO in 1902, and had become Lieutenant Colonel 17 June, 1900; retired 29 September 1905. He had contested Burnley as a Conservative in 1880, and a Division of Sheffield in 1883 and 1886. He was MP for Chichester from 1894. Lord Edmund Talbot was Private Secretary to Mr Brodrick when the latter was Secretary of State for War; also when he was Secretary of State for India. He was Junior Lord of the Treasury and Whip, 1905-6, and was the Unionist Chief Whip since 1913. He became a Director of the London, Brighton and South Coast Kailway in 1913; was Joint Parliamentary Secretary at the Treasury, 1915—16, and was Deputy Earl Marshal of England from 1917, and a Privy Councillor since 16 January 1918. Lord Edmund Talbot married, in 1879, Lady Mary Caroline Bertie, daughter of the 7th Earl of Abingdon and of Caroline Theresa, daughter of Charles Towneley, of Towneley, and they had one son, Henry, and one daughter, Magdalen. Lady Edmund Talbot was the founder of the Catholic Social Union Clubs for Girls, in London and Sheffield, and was associated with the Ladies of Charity since 1900. In 1911 she served on the Government Departmental Committee to inquire into Reformatory and Industrial Schools. She has opened, at the Settlement in East London, a Domestic Economy Centre for children and girls, which was under the Board of Education and the London County Council, likewise a School Clinic for children under those bodies. She has written on Settlement work.
[KG], GCVO (No 461), DSO, QSA (5) RofK Paard Drief Joh D-H (Col, Lord, DSO), 1902 Coronation, 1935 Jubilee, Knight of Malta Grand Cross. Glendinings 1966 £200. Spink 1972 £350. Christies 1982 £1300. Spink 1997 est £1,800-2,200.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Staff
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