The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) was instituted by Queen Victoria in 1886.  It was awarded to officers for meritorious or distinguished service in war.  At the time of the Boer War it was given to officers with senior command responsibilities, typically upwards of Major, however it was bestowed upon junior officers, usually in cases of conspicuous valour.  Prior to 1943, the order could be given only to someone who had already been Mentioned in Despatches.  The reverse bears the reigning monarch's cypher: VRI for Victoria is seen on DSO issued from 1886 to 1902 and Edward VIII's cypher until 1910.  All Boer War DSOs should bear the VRI cypher.

There were approximately 1,167 awards of the DSO for the Boer War.

DSO
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Victorian cypher
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DSO reverse and obverse
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(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
Bessell-BrowneAlfred JosephLieutenantBESSELL-BROWNE, ALFRED JOSEPH, Lieutenant, was born 3 Sept 1877, son of William H Bessell-Browne, of Sydney. He served in South Africa with the West Australian Contingent, 1899-1902, and took part in operations in the Orange Free State, including actions at Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill; operations in Natal; operations in Orange River Colony. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 August 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "A J Browne, Lieutenant, West Australians. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". (Warrant altered to A J Bessell-Browne.) He became Major 28 August 1911, 13th Australian Field Artillery Brigade, 5th Military District. Major Bessell-Browne served in the European War from 1914 to 1918. He was appointed ADC to His Excellency the Governor General of Australia 1 April, 1917; became Temporary Brigadier General, Australial Imperial Force. For his services he was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 24 September 1917; was made a CMG in 1915, and a CB in 1918. He had the Volunteer decoration. He married in 1903, Muriel Maud, daughter of Henry E Manning.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
West Australia contingent
BethellHugh EdwardLieutenant ColonelBETHELL, EDWARD HUGH, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 27 January 1854, son of W F Bethell, of Rise, Yorkshire, and of Mrs Bethell (nee Elizabeth Denison). He was educated at Rugby School, and for a short time at Wimbledon. He was gazetted to the Royal Engineers on 9 January 1873. He served in the Afghan War, 1878-80; was mentioned in Despatches, and received the Medal. He became Captain 8 January 1885; passed the Staff College, 1888-90; was Brigade Major, Royal Engineers, Headquarters, Ireland, August 1890 to August 1895; promoted Major 1 October 1892, and Lieutenant Colonel in November 1899. He served in the South African War from 1899 to 1902; on the Staff as Staff Officer, RE, at Headquarters, to November 1903, and then as Inspector of Blockhouse Lines. He was twice mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps; created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Edward Hugh Bethell, Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Engineers. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa" and was given a Brevet Colonelcy for distinguished service in the field 28 June, 1902. Colonel Bethell was promoted to substantive Colonel in 1905, and appointed Chief Engineer, Southern Command, in August of that year; he retired in August 1906. He served as a Chief Engineer, and in equivalent positions from June, 1915 to November 1917, and was awarded the CMG in 1917. Colonel Bethell married (first) in 1881, Gertrude (who died in 1888), daughter of Colonel Eustace Hill, and they had two sons: (1) Hugh Keppel, who joined the RA in 1903, transferred to the Indian Army, and served in the 7th Gurkhas, passed the Indian Staff College, transferred to the 7th Hussars, served as Staff Captain of Mixed Cavalry Brigade in 1914 in France, then Brigade Major of 6th Cavalry Brigade, then commanding 1st Northamptons, then commanding a brigade, and finally as Major General Commanding the 66th Division. He received his Brevet Majority, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel and Brevet Colonel, also the DSO and CMG and CB. (2) Christopher, who enlisted as a Private in the Foot Guards in September 1914, was given a commission in the 10th KOYLI, promoted to Captain in 1915, and was killed in action at Armentieres in February 1916. Colonel Bethell married (secondly), in 1890, Annie, daughter of the Reverend J G Lonsdale, Canon of Lichfield, and they had one son, David Jardine, who served as Lieutenant and Acting Captain, first in the 9th KOYLI, and then for three years in the 2nd Scots Guards. He was awarded the Military Cross and a Bar to the same.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
BeveridgeWilfred William OgilvyMajorBEVERIDGE, WILFRED WILLIAM OGILVY, Major, was born in Edinburgh 16 November 1864, son of J S Beveridge and Helen Ogilvy. He was educated in Kensington, and at Edinburgh University (was MB, ChM Edinburgh and DPH Cambridge); joined the RAMC 29 July 1890, and served in China, India, Bermuda, South Africa and Canada. He was on Special Service, Poona Plague Commission, in 1897. He was promoted to Major 29 September 1902. Major Beveridge served in the South African War, 1900-2; took part in the operations in Natal, March to June, 1900; served during operations in the Transvaal, July to 29 November 1900; again in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Wilfred William Ogilvy Beveridge, Major, Royal Army Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 18 September 1912; was Professor, Royal Army Medical College, 1 November 1912, to 4 August 1914. He served on the Headquarters Staff in the European War, 1914-18; was twice mentioned in Despatches; created a CB in 1915 and a CBE in 1918. He became Colonel 26 December 1917. Colonel Beveridge has the Legion d'Honneur, Croix de Chevalier and the Order of St Stanislas. He was Master of Surgery, Fellow of the Chemical Society, Fellow of the Royal Sanitary Institute, Fellow of the Royal Entomological Society of London; Analyst to the Army Medical Advisory Board, War Office; Examiner in Public Health to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, London. He has written 'On a New Method of Extracting Gases from Liquids', 'On the Use of Potassium Nitrate as a Food Preservative', 'Experiments on Tinned Foods', 'On the determination of the amount of tin in tin-plate', 'Factors in the Construction of Field Service and Expeditionary Rations', etc. He is joint author of 'A Sanitary Officer's Handbook on Practical Hygiene'. Colonel Beveridge married, in 1889, Mary, daughter of George Spencer Walker.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
BinnySteuart ScottLieutenantBINNY, STEUART SCOTT, Lieutenant, was born 1 July 1871. He was commissioned in the 19th Hussars 2 June, 1894; became Lieutenant 22 October 1898, and served in the South African War, 1899-1902, taking part in the operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop; was present at the defence of Ladysmith, including sortie of 7 December 1899, and action of 6 January 1900; served during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, October and November 1900; served as Adjutant, 19th Hussars, 1 January to 31 May 1902; took part in the operations in Orange River Colony, March, 1902 (Despatches [London Gazette, 15 November 1901]; Queen's Medal with two clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps). He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1902]: "Steuart Scott Binny, Lieutenant, 19th Hussars. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was Adjutant, 19th Hussars, 1 January 1902 to 31 December 1904, and was promoted to Captain 1 April 1903; and to Major 9 July 1910. On the outbreak of the Great War he was recalled and appointed Railway Transport Officer, and later promoted D.A. Director of Railway Transports. With the forming of the new armies, he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, and appointed to Command the 10th (Service) Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, in February 1916 and was killed instantaneously in action near Ypres on 3rd March 1916, by the bursting of a shell in his dugout. He is buried at Spoilbank Cemetery, near Zillebeke. He was additionally Mention in Despatch in the London Gazette of 1st January 1916. He had married, in 1911, Marjorie, third daughter of Henry Champion, of Sibdon Castle, Salop.
DSO, QSA (3) DofL OFS Trans (Lt 19 Hus). KSA (2) (Lt & Adj DSO 19 Hussars) 1914 Star (Maj DSO 19 Hussars), BWM, Victory Medal (Lt Col). Glendining 1997 est £1,800-2,000. DNW 2002 unsold. Chelsea 2003 £5,500. Miniature medals (DSO, QSA & KSA), ebay (Chelsea Militaria) Jan 10.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
19th (Queen Alexandra's Own Royal) Hussars
BirchEdward MassyLieutenantBIRCH, EDWARD MASSY, Lieutenant, was born 12 March, 1875, son of Lieutenant Colonel E A Birch, MD. He was gazetted to the Royal Artillery 15 June, 1895, becoming Lieutenant 15 June, 1898. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; was present during operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria; in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900; served again in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony, on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in September and October 1901, and in Cape Colony, 1900-2. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Edward Massy Birch, Lieutenant, Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. He was promoted to Captain 2 March, 1901; was Remount Officer, South Africa, 17 November 1903 to 21 November 1904; GSO2, Mauritius, 1 July 1911 to 17 December 1914; became Major 30 September 1911. Major Birch served in the European War from 1915, as GSO2, New Armies, British Expeditionary Force, 10 January 1915 to 17 May 1915; as GSO1, 25th Division, British Armies in France, 18 May 1910 to 11 January 1917; was prompted to Lieutenant Colonel 1 June, 1916: was GSO1, 5th Army, British Armies in France, 12 January to 18 May 1917; GSO1, 17th Division, British Armies in France. He was given the Brevet of Colonel 3 June, 1918; was created a CMG in 1917, and a CB in 1919, and was made an Officer of the Legion of Honour by the French. Colonel Birch married, in 1917, Violet, widow of Alfred Evans Brown.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
BirchJames Richard KemmisCaptainBIRCH, JAMES RICHARD KEMMIS, Captain, was born 19 May 1859, son of J S Birch, of Birch Grove, Roscrea. He was gazetted Lieutenant, in the East Surrey Regiment, 22 October 1881; served in the Sudan Expedition, 1885 (Suakin), with Mounted Infantry, taking part in the advance on Hasheen (severely wounded in Mardi). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 25 August 1885]; received the Medal with clasp, and the Bronze Star. He was promoted to Captain, Cheshire Regiment, 15 August 1888. From 4 July 1892 to 16 August 1897, he was Inspector of Army Signalling, Madras and Bombay. He served in the South African War, 1900-2; was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 23 June, 1902]: "James Richard Kemmis Birch, Captain, Cheshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 18 December 1902. Major Birch became Assistant Director of Signalling. He died 20 April, 1907, at Lichfield.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Cheshire Regiment
BirdSpencer GodfreyMajorBIRD, SPENCER GODFREY, Major, was born 5 January 1854, son of the Reverend Godfrey Bird (Rector of Great Wigborough, Colchester, Essex) and of Sarah Jane, his wife. He was educated at Haileybury, and joined the Militia (West Essex) 28 February 1871, being commissioned in the 102nd Regiment 28 February 1874, as Lieutenant; was Adjutant, 102nd Foot, 7 August 1875 to 11 March, 1881, and became Captain, Royal Dublin Fusiliers, 15 August 1883. He was Adjutant, Auxiliary Forces, 1 October 1886, to 24 October 1889, and became Major 21 May 1892. Major Bird served in the South African War, with the 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers, 1899 to 1902; was present in operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Talana and Lombard's Kop. He was in command of the battalion at Talana Hill and the retirement on Ladysmith, and was Second-in-Command during the remainder of the campaign, taking part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900. Operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900. He was afterwards Commandant at Krugersdorp. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901 (Sir G S White, 2 December 1899; Sir R H Buller, 9 November 1900), and London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Spencer Godfrey Bird, Major, Royal Irish Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902. He became Lieutenant Colonel 7 June, 1902; was given the Brevet of Colonel 7 June, 1905, and retired 7 July 1906. Colonel Bird volunteered for service in the European War, and was called up in October 1914. He commanded the 15th Battalion Royal Fusiliers (Kitchener's Army), at Dover and Shoreham, and again at Dover. He proceeded to France in December 1915, to visit the trenches and see special requirements for training men before going out. He was Secretary to the Oriental Club. Colonel Bird was a keen cricketer. He married, in 1880, Mary, daughter of W C Macready, Ceylon Civil Service, and they had one son and one daughter.
DSO, QSA (4) CC Tal OFS Trans, KSA (2), BWM, Regimental Medal 1906. National Army Museum 1995.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Irish Regiment
BirdWilkinson DentCaptainBIRD, WILKINSON DENT, Captain and Brevet Major, was born 4 May 1869, son of Captain J D Bird, of the 20th Hussars, and Kathleen Shortt. He was educated at Wellington College, and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and joined the Queen's (West Surrey) Regiment 22 August 1888; became Lieutenant 1 December 1890. He served under the Niger Company in the Niger Expedition, 1897, taking part in the expeditions to Egbon, Bida and Ilorin. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette 11 June, 1897]; was given the Brevet of Major 10 June, 1897, and received the Medal and clasp. He took part with the-1st Battalion of the Queen's in the operations on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98, serving with the Mohmand Field and Tirah Expeditionary Forces (Medal and two clasps). He was on Special Service in South Africa, 15 July 1899, to 16 August 1900, with the Rhodesian Regiment He was severely wounded; mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Wilkinson Dent, Bird, Captain and Brevet Major, Royal West Surrey Regiment. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. Captain and Brevet Major Bird passed the Staff College in 1901. He was specially employed at the Var Office from 1 January 1902, to 26 April, 1903; was Chief Instructor and Staff Officer, School of Musketry, Hythe, 27 April, 1903, to 8 June, 1905; was Professor, Staff College, India, 24 June, 1905, to 13 January 1909; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 18 December 1909; was GSO, Second Grade, War Office, 23 January 1910, to 23 September 1913: was promoted to Major 29 September 1910; Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Irish Rifles, 24 Sept, 1913, to 7 June, 1915; Colonel 2 June, 1913 (by antedate). He served in the European War, with the 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, in 1914, and was severely wounded; was mentioned in Despatches; was appointed ADC to the King, with the Brevet rank of Colonel, 18 February 1915. He was specially employed at the War Office, 16 April, 1915, to 7 June, 1915; was GSO, First Grade (temporary), War Office, 8 June, 1915, to 3 February 1916; Director of Staff Duties, War Office (temporary), and Temporary Brigadier General, 4 February 1916, to 31 December 1917. Lieutenant-Governor and Secretary, Royal Hospital, Chelsea, 19 May 1918, and Temporary Major General. He was created a CB in 1916, and CMG in 1918. Is an officer of the Legion of Honour and has the French Croix de Guerre. He has the Royal Geographical Society's Diploma, and has published lectures on the strategy of the Franco-German and Russo-Japanese Wars; also a Precis of Strategy. He married, in 1902, Winifred Editha, daughter of Major J B Barker, and they have two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Queen's) Royal West Surrey Regiment
BirkinRichard LeslieCaptainBIRKIN, RICHARD LESLIE, Captain, was born 2 February 1863, third son of Sir Thomas Isaac Birkin, Baronet, and Harriet, daughter of Matthew Tebbutt, of Bluntisham. He was educated at Rugby. Captain Birkin served in the South African War, 1900-2; was mentioned twice in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Richard Leslie Birkin, Captain, 3rd Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 18 December 1902. He retired from the Nottinghamshire Yeomanry as Major, and was given the Honorary rank of Lieutenant Colonel, Notts TFA, Imperial Yeomanry.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
3rd Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
BlackaderCharles GuinandCaptainBLACKADER, CHARLES GUINAND, Captain, was born 20 September 1869, son of Charles George Blackader, MA, and of Charlotte (nee Guinand). He was educated at Aldin House School, Slough, by the Reverend Hastings, and abroad. He was gazetted to the Leicestershire Regiment 22 August 1888; became Lieutenant 21 March, 1890, and Captain 6 December 1895. He was employed with the West African Frontier Force 27 November 1897 to 24 June, 1899, taking part in operations on the Niger, including the expedition to Lapia. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 23 May 1899], and received the Medal and clasp. Captain Blackader served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and was present at operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Talana and Lombard's Kop. He took part in the Defence of Ladysmith; operations in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, including actions at Belfast (26 to 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September). He was Commandant at Witbank; afterwards Station Staff Officer; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Charles Guinand Blackader, Captain, Leicestershire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was Adjutant, Volunteers, 1 August 1902, to 9 September 1904; was promoted Major 10 September 1904, and Lieutenant Colonel 10 September 1912. He served in the European War from 1914, first commanding 2nd Leicestershire Regiment. From 8 January to 30 November 1915 he commanded the Garhwal Brigade, BEF; he was ADC (extra) to the King 1 January 1916 to 31 December 1917; commanded 177th Infantry Brigade, Home Forces, 8 January to 25 June, 1916; became Colonel 10 September 1916; commanded 38th Division, British Armies in France, 12 July 1916, to 8 June, 1918; promoted Major General 1 January 1918; commanded the Southern District, Ireland, 21 November 1918. He was twice mentioned in despatches, and created a CB in 1917. He married, in 1888, Marian Ethel, daughter of George Melbourne, and they had two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Leicestershire Regiment
BlackburneCharles HaroldCaptainBLACKBURNE, CHARLES HAROLD, Captain, was born 20 May 1870, son of C E Blackburne and of Mary Riley, widow of W Shadforth Boger. He was educated at Tonbridge; served in South Africa with the 11th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry, 1900-2. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; awarded the King's and Queen's Medals, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Charles Harold Blackburne, Captain, 11th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was Assistant Secretary to the Transvaal Repatriation Department in 1902, and from 1902 to 1906 Manager of the Transvaal Government Stud. He became Captain in the 5th Dragoons (from the Special Reserve) August 1914. He served in the European War. He was severely wounded at Ypres 13 May 1915, and was given the Brevet of Major 3 June following. He served on the Headquarters Staff, Dublin, and was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1917, in recognition of his services during the Irish Rebellion. He was appointed GSO2, 25 January 1917, and GSO1, 19 April, 1918; was mentioned in Despatches. Lieutenant Colonel Blackburne was foully murdered, together with both his children, by the torpedoing of the Leinster 10 October 1918. He married, in 1903, Emily Beatrice, daughter of the Reverend Canon H D Jones, and the two small children who went down with their father were: Charles Bertram, born 3 September 1911, and Beatrice Audrey, born 24 June, 1907.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
11th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
BlairArthurCaptainBLAIR, ARTHUR, Captain, was born 2 September 1869, in India, son of Captain James Jenkins Blair, Central Indian Horse, and Mrs E C C Blair. He was educated at Cheltenham College, and Sandhurst; was gazetted to the King's Own Scottish Borderers as Second Lieutenant 1 March, 1890; promoted Lieutenant 13 February 1893; served in the Nile Expedition, 1898, including the Battle of the Atbara (Egyptian Medal with clasp; Atbara Medal); acted as ADC to Major Genrral, Infantry Brigade, at Aldershot, 10 August to 8 October 1899; served in South African War on Staff; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; participated in the operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and in the action at Spion Kop; took part in the operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and in the action at Vaal Kranz; in the operations on the Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900), and in the action at Pieter's Hill. He served in the operations in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); was severely wounded. He commanded a regiment of Scottish Horse from 17 December 1900; took part in the operations in Orange River Colony, December 1900, and in operations in Cape Colony, December 1900, to January 1901. During the South African War he was mentioned in Despatches six times [London Gazette, 26 January 1900, 8 February 1901, and 18 July 1902 (Sir R Buller), 30 March, 19 June and 9 November 1900]. He received the Queen's Medal with six clasps and the King's Medal with two clasps, and for gallantry at Spion Kop, in 1899, he was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Arthur Blair, Captain, King's Own Scottish Borderers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief, South Africa, and presented by HRH the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 August 1901. He served in the Transvaal, February 1901, to 31 May 1902; was appointed DAAG, Cape Colony District, 10 September 1902, to 22 March, 1904, and DAQMG, Cape Colony District, 23 March, 1904, to 9 September 1905; became Staff Captain and GSO, 3rd Grade, HQ of Army, 26 January 1907, to 25 October 1908; became Major 4 July 1908; was appointed Brigade Major, 10th Brigade, Eastern Command, 26 October 1908, to 25 January 1911; was GSO, 2nd Grade, South Africa, 9 March to 26 September 1912; held the same appointment in Egypt 27 September 1912 to 6 August 1914. He served in the European War from 1914, and was temporarily in the War Office 6 November to 6 December 1914; became Lieutenant Colonel 28 April, 1915; was DAA and QMG, New Armies, BEF, 7 December 1914 to 23 March, 1915; GSO2, 54th Division, BEF, 24 March to 3 May 1915; GS0.1, New Armies, BEF, 24 June, 1915, to 12 February 1916; Brigadier General, General Staff, 5th Army Corps, BEF, 13 February to 19 June 1916; Brigade Commander, 21st Infantry Brigade, Home Forces, 27 October 1916, to 26 February 1917; Brigade Commander, South Midland Reserve Brigade, Home Forces, 14 May to 18 July 1917; Commander, No 3 Section, Tyne Garrison, 19 July 1917, to 8 September 1918; Commander, Tees Garrison, 9 September 1918; promoted to Colonel, April, 1919. For his services in the European War he was twice mentioned in Despatches, and given the Brevet of Colonel 1 January 1916, for distinguished service in the field. He married (1st), Mary Beryl, daughter of General Buchanan, CB. She died in 1912. He married (secondly), in London, 11 June, 1914, Elizabeth Mary, daughter of Sir Charles Chandos Hoskyns, Bart, and they had three children: Jean Aileen Chandos: David, born 13 February 1916, and Chandos, born in 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Own Scottish Borderers
BlakeNapoleon Joseph RodolphMajorBLAKE, NAPOLEON JOSEPH RODOLPH, Major, was born at Portsmouth, 20 July 1853, son of Captain Maurice Lynch Blake and Margaret Louisa Blake. He joined the 57th Foot 12 November 1873, as Lieutenant; served in the Zulu War (Medal); became Captain, Middlesex Regiment, 14 March, 1881, and Major 19 March, 1890. He served in the South African War, 1899 to 1901, taking part in the Relief of Ladysmith, including the operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900), and action at Pieter's Hill. Operations in the Transvaal in June, 1900. Operations in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June). Operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900. Operations in Orange River Colony, June, 1900. Operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899. Operations in the Transvaal, 30 November 1900 to May 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with seven clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Napoleon Joseph Rodolph Blake, Major, Middlesex Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He retired 20 July 1901. Major Blake married, in 1888, Alice, daughter of R H Page-Henderson, of Oswaldkirk, Yorkshire, and they had one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Duke of Cambridge's Own) Middlesex Regiment
BlakeneyHerbert NorwoodCaptainBLAKENEY, HERBERT NORWOOD, Captain, was born 30 April, 1871, son of Colonel Henry Blakeney. He entered the Middlesex Regiment 29 November 1890, becoming Lieutenant 11 May 1892, and Captain 17 February 1900. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, employed with Mounted Infantry and attached to the Army Service Corps, and was present at operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including operations near Pretoria, Johannesburg and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in Orange River Colony (May to 29 November 1900), including actions at Bethlehem (6 and 7 July), Wittebergen (1 to 29 July), Ladybrand (2 to 5 September) and Bothaville; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900; operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River; operations in the Transvaal, July to September. 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, 30 November 1900, to July 1901; operations in Cape Colony, July 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Herbert Norwood Blakeney, Captain, Middlesex Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to the GOC, Natal District, and presented by Colonel Dunlop at Newcastle, Natal, 28 December 1902. He was promoted to Major 27 May 1905. Major Blakeney served in the European War from 1914, as Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, Commanding Service Battalion Middlesex Regiment, 5 February to 29 September 1916; became Lieutenant Colonel 28 September 1916; in command, Service Battalion Middlesex Regiment, 28 September 1916. He was wounded, and was created a CMG in 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Duke of Cambridge's Own) Middlesex Regiment
BodeLouis WilliamMajorBODE, LOUIS WILLIAM, Major, was born 10 June, 1860. He entered the Army 11 May 1878; passed the Staff College; served in the Zulu War, 1879, taking part in the action at Ginginhlovo (received Medal with clasp); was promoted Captain 18 September 1887; Major 27 April, 1898; served in the South African War, 1899-1900, taking part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg 5 to 8 September; during operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; during operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Louis William Bode, Major, Royal Scots. In recognition of services during operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901, and the Warrant sent 24 January 1902. He retired from the Royal Scots with the rank of Major. Major Bode married, in 1911, Ethel van Someren, daughter of Andrew Taylor, Bombay Civil Service.
DSO, Zulu Medal ‘1879', QSA (3) CC OFS Belf, (Maj Royal Scots). Edinburgh Castle 2000.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment)
BolandSinonLieutenantBOLAND, SINON B, Lieutenant, was born 12 July 1875, son of Edmund Boland. He was educated at Roman Catholic and Public Schools. He served in South Africa with the Queensland Contingent, 1901-2, taking part in operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony, May 1901 to May 1902; operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal, September and October 1901. He was slightly wounded; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Medal and two clasps, and was created a Companion of the DSO [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Sinon Boland, Lieutenant, Queensland Contingent. For services during operations in South Africa". He was transferred to the Reserve of Officers as Captain, Unattached List, 10 Dec 1904. Captain Boland served in Gallipoli in the European War, 1915, but was invalided home. He was formerly an Interstate and International footballer and an Interstate oarsman, and was a coach. His favourite amusements were horse-racing and bridge. He was married, and had two son.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Queensland contingent
BolithoWilliam Edward ThomasMajorBOLITHO, WILLIAM EDWARD THOMAS, Major, was born at Penzance 2 July 1862, son of William Bolitho, of Polwithen. He was educated at Harrow, and Trinity College, Oxford. He played for Harrow and Oxford at Lord's Cricket Ground. He joined, as Second Lieutenant, the 1st Royal Devon Yeomanry in May 1889; served with the 7th Battalion 27th Imperial Yeomanry in the South African War, 1900-1; was wounded at Nooitgedacht, Transvaal, November 1900; took part in advance to Pretoria, Battle of Diamond Hill, and holding the Mahaliesburg range of hills. He was mentioned twice in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "William Edward Thomas Bolitho, Major, 7th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He won the DSO at Nooitgedacht, Transvaal, when he led a forlorn hope up the kloof in the early morning, from General Clement's Camp, to relieve the Northumberland Fusiliers on top of the hill. He was wounded in the thigh, and lay out with his men for two days before being fetched in to an ambulance. He became Captain, 1st Royal Devon Yeomanry, 7 August 1914. He became Acting Lieutenant Colonel, 2/1st Royal Devon Yeomanry 15 September 1914, and commanded the Regiment until 11 November 1918, when he resigned on account of bad health, and went to Bath for treatment, where he died on 21 February 1919. Lieutenant Colonel Bolitho was joint Master of the Foxhounds (Western), and hunted the hounds himself. Hunting was his great passion; he was also a good cricketer and fisherman. He had married, at Inverness, 21 June, 1888, Ethel Grace Macleod, daughter of R B Aeneaes Macleod, of Cadboll, and they had two sons: William Torquill Macleod (late 19th Hussars; killed in action 24 May 1915), and Simon Bruce (who died in 1910); and one daughter, Brenda Grace.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Yeomanry
BolsLouis JeanCaptainBOLS, LOUIS JEAN, Captain, was born 23 November 1867, son of L J Bols, late Consul-General, Belgian Diplomatic Service, and of Brussels, and Mary Wilhelmina Bols. He was educated at Lancing College. He obtained his first commission in the Devonshire Regiment 5 February 1887, and became Lieutenant 22 September 1889; served in Burma, 1891-92; during operations in Kachin Hills, and received the Medal with clasp. He accompanied the Chitral Relief Force, 1895. He was promoted Captain 18 January 1897; became Adjutant 17 February 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; was present, at the Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; during operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; during operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 1900, and action at Pieter's Hill; during operations in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek; taking part in the operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900, to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned three times in Despatches [L G, 8 February 1901 (Sir R H Buller, 30 March and 9 November 1900); L G, 10 September 1901]; awarded the Queen's Medal and five clasps; the King's Medal and two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Louis Jean Bols, Captain, Devonshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 17 December 1901, and the Warrant sent 24 January 1902. He was promoted Major 2 October 1906; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel, 1912, and became Lieutenant Colonel 19 February 1914, and (Temporary) Brigadier General 24 February 1915; became GSO, 2nd Grade, 1912-14. He again saw active service in the European War, as Lieutenant Colonel, Dorsetshire Regiment (1914); received the Brevet of Colonel 3 June 1915. He was mentioned three times in Despatches, 1915; created a CB in 1915, and Commander of the Legion of Honour and St Vladimir with Swords. He became General Allenby's Chief Staff Officer in 1915, and was given a Division in 1917. He was also promoted Major General 1 January 1917. General Allenby said in his Despatch [London Gazette, 25 January 1918] that Major General L J Bols had "done brilliant work, and was a General Staff Officer of the first rank". He was created a KCMG [London Gazette, 1 January 1917]: "For valuable services culminating in the capture of Jerusalem", and was created a KCB, 1919. Sir Louis Bols married, in 1897, Augusta Blanche, second daughter of Captain Walter Cecil Strickland, of The Rise, Dawlish, Devon, and they had two sons.
KCB (m), KCMG, DSO, IGS 1854 (1) Burma 1889-92 (Lt, 2 Devons), QSA (5) T-H OFS RofL Trans L-N (Capt & Adj Devon Regt), KSA (2) (Capt & Adj Devon Regt), 1914 Star and Bar (Lt Col Dorset Regt), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Maj-Gen), Order of the Nile (Egypt) Grand Officer, Legion d'Honneur (France) 3rd Class, Order of the Redeemer (Greece) 2nd Class, Order of Al Nahda (Hejaz) 2nd Class, Order of the Rising Sun (Japan) 2nd Class, Order of St Vladimir (Russia) 4th Class with swords. Spink Mar 1994 est £5500-6000.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Devonshire Regiment
BondCharles BarberyLieutenantBOND, CHARLES BARBERY, Lieutenant, was born 14 October 1877. He was educated at Wellington, and entered the Royal Sussex Regiment 4 May 1898; was promoted Lieutenant 2 April, 1899. He served in the South African War, 1900-2; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; was present during operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); again in the Transvaal, February to May 1902, also in Orange River Colony and in Cape Colony, June 1901 to February 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Charles Barbery Bond, Lieutenant, Royal Sussex Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted Captain 2 February 1907, and was Adjutant of the Royal Sussex Regiment 5 October 1907 to 4 October 1910. Captain Bond served in the European War, 1914-18. He was promoted Major 1 September 1915, and was Temporary Lieutenant Colonel from 24 November 1915 to 31 May 1917, first with the Worcestershire Regiment, and from December 1915, commanding a Service battalion of the Border Regiment. He was Brigade Commander, 51st Infantry Brigade, British Armies in France, 1 June 1917 to 30 May 1918, and on 1 July 1918, became Brigade Commander, Chatham Reserve Infantry Brigade, Home Forces. He became Temporary Brigadier General 1 June, 1917; was created a CMG in 1916; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1918, and was five times mentioned in Despatches. He was awarded the Mons Medal.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Sussex Regiment
BondReginald CoplestonCaptainBOND, REGINALD COPLESTON, Captain, was born 28 April, 1866, son of Reverend F H Bond, MA (Oxon). He entered the Yorkshire Light Infantry, from the Militia, 10 November 1888; served with the Zhob Field Force, 1890; was promoted Lieutenant 1 April, 1890, and Captain 19 July 1894; was ADC to GOC Poona District, 7 September 1895 to 28 March, 1896. He served on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98, with the Tirah Expeditionary Force; affair at Shinkamar 29 January 1898 (Medal with two clasps). Captain Bond saw active service in South Africa, 1899-1902. He took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, August to 29 November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to August 1900, including actions at Lindley (26 June), Bethlehem (6 and 7 July) and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Reginald Copleston Bond, Captain, Yorkshire Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to the GOC, Transvaal and Orange River Colony 15 November 1902, and presented by General Lyttelton at Pretoria 14 January 1903. He became Major 7 September 1902; Lieutenant Colonel 1 May 1914. He died 1 September 1914. He had married, in 1897, Isabel Maud, daughter of Major General T B Tyler, Inspector-General, Royal Artillery, India.
DSO and Bar, IGS 1895 (2) P-F 1897-98 Tirah, QSA (4) Bel M-R Trans Witt, KSA (2) 1914 Star, BWM, Victory Medal with MID, Special Constabulary Medal. Regimental Museum 1992.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Yorkshire Light Infantry
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