The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) was instituted by Queen Victoria in 1886.  It was awarded to officers for meritorious or distinguished service in war.  At the time of the Boer War it was given to officers with senior command responsibilities, typically upwards of Major, however it was bestowed upon junior officers, usually in cases of conspicuous valour.  Prior to 1943, the order could be given only to someone who had already been Mentioned in Despatches.  The reverse bears the reigning monarch's cypher: VRI for Victoria is seen on DSO issued from 1886 to 1902 and Edward VIII's cypher until 1910.  All Boer War DSOs should bear the VRI cypher.

There were approximately 1,167 awards of the DSO for the Boer War.

DSO
gallery1
Victorian cypher
gallery1
DSO reverse and obverse
gallery1
 

Search:
(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
PooreRoger AlvinLieutenantPOORE, ROBERT MONTAGU, Captain, was born at Carysfort House, near Dublin, 20 March 1860, eldest son of Major Robert Poore, late 8th Hussars, and of Juliana Benita, daughter of Rear Admiral Sir Armar Lowry Corry, KCB. He joined the Wiltshire Regiment, as Lieutenant, from the Militia, 28 April 1886; was transferred to the 7th Hussars, as Lieutenant, 13 October 1886. He served in India from 1886 to 1895; was ADC to His Excellency the Governor of Bombay 24 October 1892 to 17 February 1895. He served in South Africa, 1895 to 1905, including the Matabele (1896) and Mashonaland (1897) Campaigns. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 18 February 1898], and was given the Brevet of Major 20 May 1898, having been promoted to Captain 1 July 1896. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, with the Military Mounted Police 9 October to 12 November 1899; as Provost-Marshal 13 November 1899 to 7 July 1902, being present at the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Dreifontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Belfast (26 and 27 August); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 16 April 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Robert Montagu Poore, Captain and Brevet Major, 7th Hussars. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 August 1901. He became Major 17 July 1901, and Lieutenant Colonel 26 June 1911. He commanded the 7th Hussars, 1911-15. He served in the European War from 1914; was promoted to Colonel 15 December 1914, and Temporary Brigadier General 14 October 1915; commanded the Jhansi Brigade (India), 1915-19; was mentioned in Despatches, and created a CIE in the Birthday Honours, 1918. He played cricket for the Bombay Presidency (India), 1892-95 and 1912-13, and for South Africa against Lord Hawke's English team during the winter of 1897-98, scoring two centuries. He was kept out of English first-class cricket till he was in his thirty-third year, owing to his regiment being on foreign service in India and South Africa. 1899 was his best year. He headed the season's batting in first-class matches, scoring 1,551 runs for 21 innings, his average working out to 91.23, which has never been equalled in first-class cricket for so large a number of runs. For Hampshire his average was 116.58. A partnership with Captain E G Wynyard produced 411 runs before they were parted. He played for the Gentlemen v Players in 1899. He did not limit his activities to the game of cricket. He was one of the finest swordsmen in the Army, being Best Man-at-Arms (Mounted events) for four consecutive years in which he competed at the Royal Naval and Military Tournament (1898, 1899, 1906, 1907). He was a first-class polo player, and played 'back' for his regimental team, taking part in several successful Inter-Regimental tournaments in India and finally in 1899 at Hurlingham. In 1899 he had a phenomenal fortnight, in which he played in the winning team (7th Hussars) in the Inter-Regimental Polo Tournament, when he hit the winning goal; was Best Man-at-Arms at the Royal Naval and Military Tournament, and scored three successive centuries for his county in first-class cricket. He has won several racquet, squash racquet and lawn tennis tournaments, and was a good shot both with the rifle and gun. He married, in 1898, Lady Flora Douglas-Hamilton, sister of the 13th Duke of Hamilton.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
7th (The Queen's Own) Hussars
Pope-HennesseyGCaptainPOPE-HENNESSEY, G, Captain, served in the South African War of 1899-1902, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "G Pope-Hennessey, Captain, Cape Police. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented there.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Cape Police
PophamRobert StewartLieutenantPOPHAM, ROBERT STEW ART, Lieutenant, was born 27 July 1876, son of Benjamin Popham, of Kinsale, Cork. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and joined the Army 20 May 1899, in the Derbyshire Regiment He became Lieutenant, Notts and Derbyshire Regiment, 13 July 1900. He served in South Africa, 1899-1902, being employed from 7 October 1901, as Staff Officer and Assistant Provost-Marshal. He was present at operations in the Orange Free State, including the actions at Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria; operations in Orange River Colony, including action at Wittebergen; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Robert Stewart Popham, Lieutenant, The Derbyshire^ Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He served as Adjutant of his regiment, 1 February 1904 to 31 January 1907, and became Captain 22 February 1906; was Adjutant, Special Reserve, 6 March 1911 to 5 March 1914. Serving in the European War, he was promoted Major 1 September 1915; was Brigade Major, 104th Infantry Brigade, 96th Infantry Brigade, New Armies, BEF, and British Armies in France, 12 January 1915 to 6 September 1916; GSO2, 55th Division, British Armies in France, 7 September 1916 to 1 March 1917; GSO2, 8th Army Corps, British Armies in France, 2 May 1917 to 6 February 1918; GSO2, Headquarters, British Salonika Force, 3 March to 18 May 1918; was appointed GS01, GHQ, British Salonika Force, 19 May 1918, and promoted Temporary Lieutenant Colonel. He was mentioned in Despatches four times; awarded the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 3 June 1918, and created a CMG in 1919, for his services in the Great War. In 1907 Colonel Popham married Mildred Mary Stewart, daughter of Major A J Roberts, 44th Regiment, and they had one son: Robert Home Stewart, born on 4 May 1909.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Sherwood Foresters) Derbyshire Regiment
PortalBertram PercyMajorPORTAL, BERTRAM PERCY, Major, was born 10 January 1866, third son of Sir Wyndham Spencer Portal, 1st Baronet, and Lady Portal (who died in 1903), eldest daughter of William Hicks Beach, of Oakley, Hampshire. He was educated at Wellington College and Sandhurst, and was gazetted a Lieutenant in the 17th Lancers 29 August 1885, and he became Captain 1 January 1895. From 18 March 1896 to 28 February 1899, he was ADC to the Governor of Madras, Sir Arthur Havelock. He served in the South African War, 1900-2, taking part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria; operations in Cape Colony, July 1901 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Bertram Percy Portal, Major, 17th Lancers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 30 October 1903, and commanded the 17th Lancers from 1903 to 1907; was given the Brevet of Colonel 30 October 1906, and retired 30 October 1907. Colonel Portal served in the European War, as a Temporary Brigadier General with the British Expeditionary Force in France, from June 1916 to April 1918. He was created a CB in 1917, for services in connection with the Irish Rebellion of 1916. He is Deputy Lieutenant and a Justice of the Peace for Hampshire. He married, in 1899, the Honourable Margaret Louisa Littleton, eldest daughter of the 3rd Baron Hatherton, and they had a son, Melville Edward Bertram, and five daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
17th (The Duke of Cambridge's Own) Lancers
PorterFrederick Joseph WilliamCaptainPORTER, FREDERICK JOSEPH WILLIAM, Captain, was born 17 April 1867, son of Captain J Porter, RA, and Mrs Porter. He was educated for the medical profession (qualifying as Member of the Royal College of Surgeons and Licentiate Royal College of Physicians. He became Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps, 28 July 1891. Captain Porter served in the South African War, 1899-1902; was present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg 17 to 26 February, and actions at Poplar Grove, Karee Siding and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; operations in the Orange River Colony, May to 26 November 1900, including action at Wittebergen; operations in the Transvaal, April 1901 to 31 May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to March 1901, and April 1901; operations in Cape Colony, March to April 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Frederick Joseph William Porter, Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was employed with the South African Constabulary 1 July 1901 to 28 February 1905, and was promoted to Major 28 July 1903. Major Porter retired from the Army 22 November 1913. He was Senior Medical Officer, Sierra Leone, and later practised as an operating surgeon in Bombay. He married (1st), in 1891, Margaret, daughter of William Goff, and they had one son and two daughters; and (secondly), in 1915, Katherine Margery, youngest daughter of Henry Shaw, and they have a son.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
PorterReginald WhitworthMajorPORTER, REGINALD WHITWORTH, Major, was born 18 May 1856. He entered the Oxford Light Infantry 6 September 1876, as Second Lieutenant from the Militia, becoming Captain 11 January 1886, and Major 9 November 1894. Major Porter served on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98, with the Mohmand Field and Tirah Expeditionary Forces (Medal with two clasps). He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Reginald Whitworth Porter, Major, Oxford Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to Lord Roberts, and were presented by Major General Knox at Kroonstad 21 March 1902. Major Porter died of disease on 10 May 1902.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Oxfordshire Light Infantry
PowellAtherton ffolliotMajorPOWELL, ATHERTON FFOLLIOT, Major, was born 6 January 1858, son of Captain Thomas ffolliot Powell, formerly of the 16th Lancers, and HM's Commissioner of Prisons for Scotland. He was educated at Cheltenham, and joined the Royal Artillery as Lieutenant 31 January 1878, and served in the Sudan, 1885-80, with the Frontier Field Force (Despatches, Medal and clasp, Bronze Star). He became Captain 21 July 1886, and Major 29 August 1896. In 1897-98 he took part in the operations on the North-West Frontier of India, with the Tirah Expeditionary Force, taking part in the action of Dargai. Operations on the Samana Range and in the Kurram Valley (Medal with three clasps). Major Powell served in the South African War, 1899-1902 (on Special Service with the Rhodesian Field Force, 6 April 1900 to 30 September 1901); and was present at operations in the Transvaal and Cape Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, May and June 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Atherton ffolliot Powell, Major, Royal Garrison Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to Lord Kitchener, and presented by Lieutenant Colonel Vyvyan at Vryberg. He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 2 November 1904; commanded the Heavy Brigade at Plymouth, 1906-10; was given the Brevet of Colonel 2 November 1907, and retired with the rank of Colonel 4 December 1909. Colonel Powell rejoined the Army for temporary service 7 October 1914, and became Commandant, Siege Training Centre, Deepcut. He married, in 1904, Alice, daughter of Major S H Powell, of Park Hill, King's Lynn, and they had one son and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Garrison Artillery
PowellEdward Weyland MartinCaptainPOWELL, EDWARD WEYLAND MARTIN, Captain, was born 3 December 1869, youngest son of Lieutenant Colonel W Martin Powell, of Brooklands. He was gazetted to the Royal Artillery 27 July 1889; became Lieutenant 27 July 1892, and Captain, 18 December 1899. Captain Powell served in the South African War, 1899-1901, and was present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg, actions at Poplar Grove, Karee Siding, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to August 1900, including actions at Eland's River and Venterskroon; operations in Orange River Colony, July to November 1900, including actions at Bethlehem and Wittebergen; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including actions at Colesberg; operations in Cape Colony, November 1900 to October 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Edward Weyland Martin Powell, Captain, Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He was Adjutant, Royal Artillery, 5 May 1905 to 12 February 1906; became Major 11 February 1906; retired 2 July 1910, entering the Reserve of Officers. Major Powell served in the European War, 1914-18; was mentioned in Despatches; created a CMG in 1918; a CB in 1919, and awarded the Legion of Honour. He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel, Reserve of Officers, 1 January 1917, and the honorary rank of Brigadier General 26 February 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
PowerWilliam SayerLieutenantPOWER, WILLIAM SAYER, Lieutenant, was born 2 January 1859, son of William Power, of Bramcote. He served in the South African War, with the Imperial Yeomanry, from 1899 to 1900, and was present in operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including actions at Biddulphsherg, Lindley (1 June), Rhenoster River, Lindley (26 June), Bethlehem (6 and 7 July), Wittebergen (1 to 29 July) and Witpoort; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899 to 1900. He was wounded: mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "William Sayer Power, Lieutenant, 4th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He retired from the Derby Yeomanry 13 March 1901, and became Major, Territorial Force, Reserve of Officers. He married, in 1906, Jessy Isabel, eldest daughter of Vaughan Harming Vaughan-Lee, JP, DL, of Dillington Park, Somerset, and widow of W Boden, of Pastures, Derby.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
4th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
PoynterArthur VernonCaptainPOYNTER, ARTHUR VERNON, Captain, was born 9 November 1871, only son of Lieutenant Colonel James Poynter, formerly 14th Hussars. He was educated at Radley College, joined the Scots Guards and retired. Served in the South African War, 1899-1901, with the Imperial Yeomanry; was Commandant, Imperial Yeomanry Depot. He took part in operations in the Transvaal; was dangerously wounded; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Arthur Vernon Poynter, Captain, 10th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 17 December 1901. He was ADC to the Viceroy of India, 1902-5; ADC to the Governor-General of Canada, 1906-7. Major Poynter served in the European War, 1914—16, and was severely wounded. He married, in 1917, at Charlton Park Church, Malmesbury, Wiltshire, Lady Agnes Isabel Howard, third daughter of the 18th Earl of Suffolk.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
10th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
PrattErnest St GeorgeCaptainPRATT, ERNEST ST GEORGE, Brevet Major, was born 3 September 1863, youngest son of Spencer Pratt, of Stanwick House, Higham Ferrers. He was gazetted to the Durham Light Infantry 23 August 1884; was Adjutant, Durham Light Infantry, 19 November 1892 to 18 November 1896, and became Captain 11 April 1894. Captain Pratt served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as Special Service Officer, and afterwards on the Staff, and in command of the Mounted Infantry Battalion. He took part in the Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; during operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900) and action at Pieter's Hill; in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); in command of the 13th Battalion Mounted Infantry from 7 November 1900 to 31 May 1902; in the Transvaal, December 1900 to July 1901, and November 1901 to 31 May 1902; in Orange River Colony, July to November 1901, and May 1902; during the operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal, September and October 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches (Sir R H Buller, 30 March and 9 November 1900) [London Gazette, 8 February 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Brevet of Major 29 November 1900; the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Ernest St George Pratt, Captain and Brevet Major, Durham Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the South African War". He was DAAG for Musketry, Eastern District, 2 February 1903 to 31 May 1905, and 1 June 1905 to 31 May 1908; was promoted to Major 7 May 1903; was GSO2, Lowland Division, Scottish Command, 1 April 1908 to 17 October 1909. He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 23 July 1910, and became Lieutenant Colonel 15 August 1910; was Assistant Director, War Office, 28 July 1913 to 20 July 1915; became Colonel 16 December 1913. During the European War he commanded a brigade from 21 July 1915. He became Inspector of Infantry, and was created a CB in 1916. Brigadier General E St G Pratt died 24 November 1918. He had married, in 1902, Edith, daughter of Captain H P Andrew, 8th Hussars, and they had one daughter, Kathleen Marion.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Durham Light Infantry
PrattMervynCaptainPRATT, MERVYN, Captain, was born 24 April 1873, son of Joseph Pratt, JP, DL, and Madeline Charlotte, only daughter of James Hamilton, of Cornacassa, Monaghan. He was educated at Harrow, and entered the King's Royal Rifle Corps 26 June 1895; became Lieutenant, KRRC, 14 June 1898, and Captain 24 September 1901. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 1900, and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June) (severely wounded); operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, 1901-2. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 17 June 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Mervyn Pratt, Captain, King's Royal Rifle Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 15 January 1903. Captain Pratt retired 5 August 1910; became Temporary Major, KRRC, in 1914, and was promoted to Major, Reserve of Officers, 4 May 1916.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Royal Rifle Corps
PrescottJohn Joseph WhitworthLieutenantPRESCOTT, JOHN JOSEPH WHITWORTH, Lieutenant, was born 5 September 1875, son of G Prescott, The Hermitage, Merrion, Dublin. Was educated at RCSI, Meath Hospital, Dublin; Charing Cross Hospital, and Royal London Ophthalmic Hospital; entered the Army as Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps, on 27 July 1899; served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and was present in the operations in Natal, 1899. Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900), and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); operations in the Transvaal, July to 29 November 1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November to 31 May 1902. Was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 and 22 February 1900], received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "John Joseph Whitworth Prescott, Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to South Africa, and presented by HRH the Duke of Cornwall and York 14 August 1901. He was promoted Captain 27 July 1902; became Adjutant, Territorial Force, 27 November 1908. Qualified as Specialist in Ophthalmology, and obtained accelerated promotion to Major on 27 April 1911; became Lieutenant Colonel 1 March 1915. He served in the European War from August 1914, and was mentioned in Despatches by Field Marshal Sir John French. He organized the Northumberland War Hospital, and commanded it to 25 September 1915, when he proceeded to Gallipoli, as OC, 17th Stationary Hospital, until the evacuation of the Peninsula; subsequently commanded the same hospital in Egypt, Taj Mahal War Hospital, Alexandra War Hospital, and Cumballa War Hospital, Bombay, and later was OC, 34th General Hospital, Deolali. Lieutenant Colonel Prescott was brought to the notice of the Government of India [Indian Gazette of September 1918]. Appointed Honorary Surgeon to the Viceroy from 5 November 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Unknown
PriceBartholomew GeorgeCaptainPRICE, BARTHOLOMEW GEORGE, Captain, was born 7 May 1870. He was gazetted to the Royal Fusiliers 18 June 1892, becoming Lieutenant 15 September 1896, and Captain 2 August 1899. Captain Price served in the South African War, 1899-1902; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the actions at Colenso; operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 1900, and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in the Transvaal, May and June 1900; operations in Natal, March and June 1900; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River, including action at Ruidam. He served as Adjutant, 2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers, from August 1901 to 31 May 1902; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to February 1901; operations in Cape Colony, February 1901 to May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Bartholomew George Price, Captain, Royal Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 18 December 1902. He was Adjutant, Royal Fusiliers, from 17 May 1901 to 16 May 1904; Adjutant, Militia, 18 August 1904 to 14 August 1909; was promoted to Major 5 March 1910. He served in the European War, 1914-18; commanded the 150th Infantry Brigade, British Expeditionary Force, British Armies in France, 4 February 1916 to 24 February 1918; was Brigade Commander, Northern Section, Plymouth Garrison, 12 April to 14 December 1918; Area Commandant, British Armies in France, 15 December 1918. He was mentioned in Despatches; given the Brevets of Lieutenant Colonel (18 February 1915) and Colonel, 3 June 1917, and created a CMG in 1917, and CB in 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)
PriceCharles LempriereLieutenantPRICE, CHARLES LEMPRIERE, Lieutenant, was the only child of Colonel Thomas Charles Price, of 8, Inverness Gardens, Kensington, London, late RA, and his wife, Amy Earle, daughter of Charles MConteiro D'Almeida Lempriere, and grandson of Colonel Thomas Smith Price, HEICS (who received the Punjab Medal with clasps for Mooltan and Goojerat). He was born at Alderney, Channel Islands, 17 September 1877. He was educated at St Paul's School; privately, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; gazetted Second Lieutenant, Royal Scots, 8 September 1897, and promoted Lieutenant 29 June 1890, and Captain 3 November 1903. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; took part in operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900 including actions at Belfast (26-27 August) and Lydenberg (5-8 September); operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to December 1901, and February to 31 May 1902; operations in Orange River Colony, December 1901 to February 1902; was Acting Provost-Marshal, Komati Poort, and afterwards Station Staff Officer (twice mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 20 August and 10 September 1901]; Queen's Medal with three clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps; awarded DSO "for gallantry in leading an attack on the Boer position at Bermondsey, East Transvaal, 16 May 1901"). The award of his Distinguished Service Order was gazetted 27 September 1901: "Charles Lempriere Price, Lieutenant, Royal Scots. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. He served in the European War with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from — August; was appointed Adjutant at the Front, and was killed in action at Vailly on 16 September following, during the Battle of the Aisne, while in command of the regiment. A brother officer wrote: "I was present at the Battle of Mons with him and also at Le Cateau, and in the trying retreat almost as far as Paris, during the whole of which he was indefatigable, cheery, doing the work of ten men, full of resource, regardless of danger, the bravest and finest man I have ever known or wish to know; in losing him we have lost our best, a great sportsman and staunch friend. He will be mourned by the whole regiment, by whom he was respected and beloved"; and Private P Clancy, in describing his experiences during this time, said ('Dundee Advertiser'): "We met the Germans on 23 August. On the 26th we were nearly annihilated at Cambray owing to the French reinforcements not coming up. About 7.30 o'clock that morning one of our airmen descended and reported that the French were advancing about 20 miles off, and would be able to reinforce us about midday. We waited anxiously, but 12 o'clock came and no French, and five o'clock and still no French. Half an hour later Major Butler gave the order, 'Retire, men, for God's sake; every man for himself'. Shells were flying thick about us, and it was an awful order to give. We got the order all right, but, with a few exceptions, it did not reach the Gordons, with disastrous results to them. So we began the never-to-be-forgotten retreat, with shells and bullets flying about everywhere. We got into Einecourt. When we got between a church and a farmhouse we came across two women and a child. Pipe-Major Duff said he would stay behind and look after them. This he did, and we saw no more of them. Our Adjutant, Captain Price, who was one of the finest and most popular of the officers, and who was on horseback, said to us, 'Keep your heads, men. There are no marked men here. If the bullets are going to hit you they will hit you'. The Gordons, 18th Royal Irish and 2nd Royal Scots were all together on the retreat, falling back as fast as they could. The last fight on the retreat was at St Quentin, and then we fell back to Hams, within 24 kilometres of Paris. We blew up all the bridges and the roads as we retreated except one bridge, and upon that solitary bridge and for five miles beyond it 150 guns of the outer defences of Paris were trained. On came the massed forces of the Germans and started to cross the bridge. Out blazed the guns and the bridge was blown to bits, along with the Germans who were approaching and crossing it. Their losses were awful. But for us it was a terrible retreat, and I shall never forget it. Then came the turning movement. We were seventeen days and nights in the trenches at the Aisne without being relieved. It was a time of artillery duels. Here we lost Captain Price, who had saved thousands of men at Cambray. He lost his life trying to save another's. One of our NCO's was wounded and began to yell. Captain Price was in his bomb-proof dug-out when he heard the shouting, and he called out to the man,'All right, man, I will be with you in a few minutes'. Just as he got out of the trench he was hit by a bit of shell, and died a few hours afterwards. His loss was deeply regretted, because he was beloved by everybody". At Mons, when the troops were in full retreat, men of many regiments hurrying down the road, and getting hopelessly mixed and out of hand, under heavy shell fire, he noticed some guns on a ridge, and succeeded in rallying some of his men in all that ghastly confusion, and holding the ridge for over an hour, while the guns were removed. Captain Price was mentioned in FM Sir John (now Lord) French's Despatch of 8 October 1914, "for gallant and distinguished service in the field". He had the Coronation Medal and was Past Grand Sword Bearer of England. In a speech at the Annual Dinner of the Royal Scots, Edinburgh Association (29 March 1902), Colonel Douglas described how, during the Boer War, Captain Price was recommended for the VC. They attacked the Boers, said Colonel Douglas, in a very strong position at Bermondsey, their flanks being protected by precipices. It was a difficult position to turn. He sent Lieutenant Dalmahoy with E Company to the left, and they were round the Boer's right in no time. The guns were in action at 1,600 yards. But E Company made the Boers bolt. Major Moir and Lieutenant Dalmahoy went after them. Then the Boers took up a rear-guard position, and it was here that Major Moir got hit in five places. He (Colonel Douglas) sent Lieutenant Price with a message to the firing line. When he reached it Corporal Paul was in command. Lieutenant Dalmahoy, Private Sheddon and another man were lying wounded about 50 yards in front of the firing line, which was 100 yards from the Boers. Then men had two of the small entrenching implements with them, and with these each scraped up a little earth in front of them. This was the only cover they had. Lieutenant Price ran out, picked up the nearest of the three wounded men, and carried him in. He found it heavy work and called for three volunteers. Three young Lance Corporals, M'Gill, Miller and Smith, at once responded. He made them take off their equipment and coats, and did the same himself, and then unarmed and in shirt sleeves they ran out. Nevertheless, the Boer at once turned a heavy fire on them, and, in bringing in the wounded, on of the bearers was hit. Lieutenant Dalmahoy was again hit in the head, and Private Sheddon was killed. Lord Kitchener promoted Corporal Paul to Sergeant for his gallantry, and recommended Lieutenant Price for the VC, and the three young lance-corporals for Distinguished Conduct Medals.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment)
PrichardCharles StewartMajorPRICHARD, CHARLES STEWART, Major, was born 20 October 1861. He was educated at Marlborough, and joined the Northamptonshire Regiment as Lieutenant, 10 May 1882, becoming Captain 2 September 1889. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; took part in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to November 1900, including actions at Veriterskroon (7 and 9 August); in Orange River Colony, May to November 1900, including actions at Lindley (1 June) and Rhenoster River; again during the operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 9 July and 3 December 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "Charles Stewart Prichard, Major, Northamptonshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC, Transvaal, and presented by General Lyttelton at Pretoria 14 January 1903. He was promoted to Major 30 August 1901, and Lieutenant Colonel 2 June 1911. He served in the European War from 1914; became Colonel 15 December 1914; was mentioned in Despatches, and created a CB in 1915. He retired from the Staff 7 November 1918, with the honorary rank of Brigadier General.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Northamptonshire Regiment
PringleRobertLieutenant ColonelPRINGLE, ROBERT, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 25 August 1855, son of Gilbert Pringle, of Stranraer. He joined the Army 5 October 1878, and served in the Afghan War (Medal); in the Mahsud-Waziri Expedition, 1881 (mentioned in Despatches), and in the Zhob Valley Expedition in 1884. He was Principal Veterinary Officer, 3rd Army, 11 December 1901 to 11 February 1903. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as Senior Veterinary Officer, Lines of Communication; operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Robert Pringle, Lieutenant Colonel, Army Veterinary Department. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Principal Veterinary Officer and Lieutenant Colonel 11 December 1901; was Inspecting Veterinary Officer, India, 19 March 1903 to 31 May 1907; Principal Veterinary Officer, Aldershot Command, 5 February 1908 to 14 October 1910; created a CB in 1909. He was Director-General, AVS, 15 October 1910 to 1917. He was promoted to Colonel 15 October 1910, and retired on that date with the honorary rank of Major General. He was created a KCMG in 1917. Sir Robert Pringle married, in 1899, Sophie, eldest daughter of George Moir Byres, of Tonley.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Army Veterinary Department
PriorJohn HarveyLieutenantPRIOR, JOHN HARVEY, Lieutenant, was born 14 December 1871, son of E HPrior, of Bridgwater. He served in the South African War from 1899 to 1901, being employed as Station Staff Officer from 10 February 1901, and was present in operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899 to 1900, including the actions at Colesberg 1 January to 12 February 1900; operations in the Transvaal, May 1901; operations in Orange River Colony 30 November 1900 to May 1901. For his services he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; was awarded the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "John Harvey Prior, Lieutenant, Plymouth Division, Royal Engineers, Submarine Miners (Militia). In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King. Major (Temporary Lieutenant Colonel) J H Prior served in the European War. He was mentioned in Despatches, and was awarded a Bar to the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 16 September 1918]; "John Harvey Prior, DSO, Royal Engineers, Special Reserve. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in action, when he volunteered to attach himself and his company to a battalion which was threatened by an outflanking movement. By his personal courage and excellent handling of his company he was successful in holding the enemy and in assisting the battalion to withdraw at a very critical moment". He was also awarded the Legion of Honour. He married, in 1895, Emily Rose, widow of G B Long, JP, of Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire, and they had one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
PriorMontaguLieutenantPRIOR, MONTAGU, Lieutenant, served in the South African War, was slightly wounded, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Montagu Prior, Lieutenant, Bethune's Mounted Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented by Major General Stephenson at Friedrichstad 4 April 1904.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bethune's Mounted Infantry
ProbynPercy JohnCaptainPROBYN, PERCY JOHN, Captain, is the eldest son of Frederick Probyn, JP, Cambridge House, Trevethen, Monmouthshire; was educated privately at Weston-super-Mare; at the University Colleges, Cardiff, and Aberystwith; Charing Cross Medical School and Hospital (entrance Science Scholar, Pereira Prizeman, three silver medals, several Honours Certificates); Member Royal College of Surgeons (England); Licentiate Royal College of Physicians, London; entered the Army Medical Corps in 1896; served in the Lagos Expeditionary Force (Medal and clasp), 1897 to 1898; in the Sierra Leone Expedition, 1898-99 (clasp). He served in the South African War, taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including the action at Magersfontein; Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February), actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in Orange River Colony May 1901; operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal, Sept and October 1901; operations in the Transvaal, May 1901 to February 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Percy John Probyn, Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent to South Africa, and presented there. He became Major 29 October 1907, and Lieutenant Colonel 1 March 1915. In 1906 he took his degree of MB and BS (Intermediate, 1905), London University; DPH (Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons), 1907; became Barrister-at-Law, 1908; Fellow of the Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn; became an FRIPH; Member of the Royal Sanitary Institute, and Member of the Hardwicke Society; was Assistant Demonstrator Pathology, Charing Cross Hospital Medical School; obtained Honourable Mention in Medicine, Army Medical School, Netley; was appointed Prosector Royal College of Surgeons, and Sanitary Specialist Officer, South China Command. His favourite recreations were cycling, shooting, riding and fishing. He married Sara Marie Calhoun, daughter of Eugene Colhoun, and together they had four daughters and one son, Yvonne, Idina, Phyllis, Yvette and Dighton.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
Page 43 of 59
<<First <Prev 41 4243 44 45 Next> Last>>

 

Only registered users can post comments