The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) was instituted by Queen Victoria in 1886.  It was awarded to officers for meritorious or distinguished service in war.  At the time of the Boer War it was given to officers with senior command responsibilities, typically upwards of Major, however it was bestowed upon junior officers, usually in cases of conspicuous valour.  Prior to 1943, the order could be given only to someone who had already been Mentioned in Despatches.  The reverse bears the reigning monarch's cypher: VRI for Victoria is seen on DSO issued from 1886 to 1902 and Edward VIII's cypher until 1910.  All Boer War DSOs should bear the VRI cypher.

There were approximately 1,167 awards of the DSO for the Boer War.

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DSO
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Victorian cypher
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DSO reverse and obverse
 

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(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
OgilvyLyulph Gilchrist StanleyCaptainOGILVY, THE HONOURABLE LYULPH GILCHRIST STANLEY, Captain, was born at Airlie Lodge, Campden Hill, London, 25 June 1861, son of David, 7th Earl of Airlie. He was educated at Wiriton House, Winchester, and Eton; was a subaltern, 2nd Lanark Militia; joined Brabant's Horse, 1899; promoted to Captain. He says: "I do not remember when I joined the Army. My rank at the time when I won the DSO was Captain, I think, but I do not know exactly what it was. My last service was in 1914-15, Lieutenant, ASC, Scottish Horse. I do not know why I was given the DSO; the reasons were not stated in any communication when the British Consul at Denver handed me the DSO. I was a Corporal in the 2nd US Cavalry (Torrey's Rough Riders), in the Spanish-American War of 1898. I think I was mentioned in Despatches twice. Once, I know, as foreman on a mule ship, Hurona, in charge of mules, New Orleans to Cape Town. Joined Brabant's Horse at Queenstown, South Africa, after delivering mules at Cape Town. First engagement, Dordrecht, others Labuscagne, Aliwal North. Went on relief to Wepener, surrounding movement, and surrender of Fouriesberg; thence to Kroonstad and Pretoria. At Belfast with Lord Roberts, to Machaderdorp, Davel's Kantoor; with General Stephenson (Essex) at Nielo Spruit. Back to Machaderdorp, where we were compelled to turn our horses over to General French, and back to Pretoria for new horses. Resigned and came home on account of my brother Lord Airlie's death at Diamond Hill, where he commanded the 12th Lancers. This was about December 1900. Applied for another (commission) about February 1901; after waiting a couple of months in London, and not receiving it, notified them that as they did not need me I would return to US. This was by no means a solitary case; it occurred to several people as strongly recommended as I was. I mention this for your information, as I was afterwards gazetted. Lord Roberts inquired about the matter, and on my explaining it, said I had done quite right in the matter. In every case I have found it only with difficulty one could press one's services on the War Office, even when they claim most bitterly that men are scarce. I repeat, however, that this is merely for your information, in case there should be any confusion in regard to that commission which, as I did no service, did not count. Please excuse this ill-typed letter; machines are strange to me, but my writing is even worse". He received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "The Honourable Lyulph Gilchrist Stanley Ogilvy, Captain, Brabant's Horse. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He married, on 27 August 1902, at Waterdale, Loneland, Colorado, USA, Gertrude Edith Boothroyd, daughter of Philip Henry and Edith Boothroyd, and they had two children: Jack David Angus Ogilvy, born at La Lalle, Colorado, 18 June 1903 and Blanche Edith Maude Ogilvy, who was born at La Lalle, Colorado, USA, 27 September 1905, and died 26 March 1915.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Brabant's Horse
OllivantJohn SpencerCaptainOLLIVANT, JOHN SPENCER, Captain, was born 31 July 1872, son of Colonel E A Ollivant, of Nuthurst, Horsham. He was gazetted to the Royal Artillery 1 October 1892, and became Lieutenant 1 Oct 1895, and Captain 7 April 1900; was Divisional Adjutant, 5th Brigade, RA, 16 September 1900 to 31 March 1901, and Adjutant, RA, 1 April 1901 to 21 January 1904, serving in the South African War from 1899 to 1902. He was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations in the Transvaal, June to 29 November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, January to March, and May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "John Spencer Ollivant, Captain, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 Oct, 1902. Captain Ollivant was Staff Captain, HQ of Army, 5 November 1904 to 4 November 1908; became Major 20 October 1909. He served in the European War in France and Flanders, 1914-19; as Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, RA, 21 August to 13 September 1915; became Lieutenant Colonel 14 September 1915; was Brigadier General, RA, 3rd Division, British Armies in France, from 24 July 1916. He was twice mentioned in Despatches; was given the Brevets of Lieutenant Colonel (18 February 1915) and Colonel (1 January 1918), and was created a CMG in 1917, and a CB in 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
OlliverSpencer AlwynneLieutenantOLLIVER, SPENCER ALWYNNE, Lieutenant, was born in May 1859, at Kingston Manor, near Worthing, son of George Olliver, DL, of Kingston Manor, Sussex, and Fanny, daughter of John King, of Southampton. He was educated for the Navy at a preparatory school, and after that at the Naval School, Portsmouth; passed into the Britannia, and joined the Royal Navy in 1872, retiring as Lieutenant in 1882. He served in South Africa, 1900 and 1901, with the West Australian Mounted Rifles; resigned his commission in 1901, and joined Baden-Powell's South African Constabulary as Captain (commission dated 3 March 1900). For his services in the South African War he received the two Medals and seven clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "S A Olliver, Lieutenant, West Australian Mounted Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by HRH the Duke of Cornwall and York on his visit to Natal 14 August 1901. Captain Olliver died at Pretoria on 28 April 1902, and an obituary notice describes the action for which he had been awarded the DSO: Spencer Alwynne Olliver, DSO, South African Constabulary, who died on 28 April, at Pretoria, of enteric, as has been announced, was the youngest son of George Olliver, DL, of Kingston (Sussex). He was born in 1859, entered the Royal Navy, 1872, and retired as Lieutenant in 1882. Shortly after the outbreak of the war he joined the West Australian Mounted Rifles, in which he did gallant service; was mentioned in Despatches, and received the DSO. He was afterwards transferred to the SAC, in which he was serving at the time of his death, which occurred after he was pronounced out of danger and shortly expected home. The last fight with which Captain Olliver was prominently connected was described by Reuter's correspondent as a smart engagement, which took place on 6 February, between a force of West Australians, Dragoon Guards and Cape Police, and Kruitsinger's Commando, in Cape Colony, about 15 miles from Klipplaat. The British force, numbering only 27 men all told, was under the command of Captain Olliver, and was carrying Despatches. On drawing close to Featherstonehaugh's Farm, they sighted a small body of Boers. To the rear of the Boers was a fairly high kopje, and on this they fell back. Hot firing ensued, and the Boers, after being reinforced, executed a wide detour, and surrounded Captain Olliver's little band. Just before sunset a body of Boers, estimated at 5O0, opened a terrific fire upon the two kopjes held by the British, and about 200 of their horsemen were seen to be charging the British position. Not one of the gallant band so heavily outnumbered thought of surrendering, but eventually they were all overpowered and captured. The Boers admitted five killed, one of whom was shot by Captain Olliver at five yards distance. After being marched three miles under escort, and stripped of their arms and ammunition, the prisoners were released. The death of the gallant captain, at the end of the war, and after much laborious and distinguished service, is naturally a great blow to his relatives and friends". An obelisk was erected, inscribed as follows: "In memory of Sergt. John Jacobs, age 30 years, Private Samuel Chance, age 22 years, Private James Peck, age 22 years, 7th Dragoon Guards, who with 28 others under Captain Olliver for seven hours kept at bay a force of over 400 of the King's enemies, and thus nobly died at Featherstonehaugh 6 February 1901. This stone was erected by the residents of Klipplaat and vicinity". Captain Olliver had married Sophy, daughter of Henry Duncan.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
West Australia contingent
OrrAlexander StewartMajorORR, ALEXANDER STEWART, Major, was born 10 May 1861, son of William Orr, of Hougomont, Ballymena. He was gazetted to the Royal Irish Regiment 22 October 1881; served in the Egyptian Expedition, 1882, being present at the action at Kassassin and at the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir (Medal with clasp, and Khedive's Star); was promoted Captain 30 October 1888; took part in the Hazara Expedition, 1888 (Medal with clasp); participated in operations on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98, being present at the operations on the Samana (Medal with two clasps); was promoted Major 31 May 1900. Major Orr served in the South African War, 1899-1902, taking part in operations in the Orange Free State, March to May 1900; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, in November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony, May to November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900, including actions at Colesberg (24 January to 12 February). He was afterwards Station Staff Officer. Operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 25 April 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Alexander Stewart Orr, Major, Royal Irish Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902; the Warrant, etc, sent 4 November 1902. He was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 19 February 1905, given the Brevet of Colonel 19 February 1908, and retired with the rank of Colonel in 1909. Colonel Orr died 10 January 1914.
DSO, Egypt (1) Tel El Kebir (Lt, RIR), IGS 1854 (1) Hazara 1888 (Lt, RIR), IGS 1895 (2) P-F 1897-98 Samana 1897 (Capt, RIR), QSA (3) CC OFS Trans (Maj DSO), KSA (2) (Maj DSO), Khedives Star 1882. Sothebys 1982 £900. Glendinings 1989 £850.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Irish Regiment
OrrJohn BoydLieutenantORR, JOHN BOYD, Lieutenant, was horn 16 August 1871, only surviving son of Colonel Spencer Edward Orr, of Dullatur, Camberley, and of Mrs Orr, of Belfield, Camberley. He entered the Norfolk Regiment, 18 October 1893, and became Lieutenant 29 August 1896. He was awarded the Royal Humane Society's Medal in 1894, for saving from drowning a woman who had attempted suicide by throwing herself into the river at Bishop's Bridge, Norwich. Lieutenant Orr served in the South African War; was ADC to the Brigadier Commanding the Mounted Infantry Brigade, South Africa, from November 1900 to October 1901, and saw a great deal of service. He took part in the Relief of Kimberley, and among the actions in which he fought were those at Paardeberg, Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River, Zand River, Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "John Boyd Orr, Lieutenant, Norfolk Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Captain 25 October 1901, and for two years from 1906 he was employed with the Transvaal Volunteers, and from May 1910 to December 1918, he was with the West African Frontier Force. He became Major in 1913. An obituary notice says: "A distinguished soldier is lost to the country in Major John Boyd Orr, DSO, 1st Battalion Norfolk Regiment, who died on 24 August 1914, from wounds received in action at the Battles of Mons".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Norfolk Regiment
OrrMichael HarrisonMajorORR, MICHAEL HARRISON, Major, was born at Ballymena, County Antrim, on 23 December 1859, son of William Orr, Solicitor, of Ballymena, and Mary Orr (nee Harrison). He was educated at Trinity College, Stratford-on-Avon, and joined the 19th Regiment 14 January 1880; served in the Egyptian War, 1884-86; Frontier Field Force in Egypt (Egyptian Medal and Khedive's Star). He served in the South African Campaign, 1899-1902; served in Lord Roberts's march from Bloemfontein to Pretoria; was present at the engagements of Brandfort, Vet River, Zand River, and the operations near Johannesburg and Pretoria, also Diamond Hill and Belfast; in the operations near Colesberg, under General Sir John French (dangerously wounded; Despatches), he was mentioned in Despatches 4 May 1900, and 29 July 1902; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Michael Harrison Orr, Major, Alexandra Princess of Wales's Own (Yorkshire) Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Major Orr retired from the 1st Battalion Yorkshire Regiment 23 December 1907.
DSO, Egypt (0) (Lt, Yorks Regt), QSA (5) CC OFS Joh D-H Belf (Maj), KSA (2) (Maj, DSO, Yorks Regt), Khedives Star. Sothebys 1982 £720. Glendinings 1989 est £450-550.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Princess of Wales's Own) Yorkshire Regiment
OswaldWilliam DigbyLieutenantOSWALD, WILLIAM DIGBY, Lieutenant, was born at Southampton 20 January 188O youngest son of Thomas Ridley Oswald and the only son of Wilhelmina Catherine, his second wife (nee Russell), formerly of Southampton, and afterwards of Castle Hall, Milford Haven, and of Blackheath. He went to Rugby in 1895, and in 1898 he won the Wrigley Cup for his House by his own unaided efforts, winning four events—the Quarter Mile, High Jump, Weight, and Hurdles. He left the same year, and in 1899 entered the Army, through the Militia, being gazetted to the 2nd Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. He saw service in Egypt, and later in South Africa, as Lieutenant and Adjutant of the Railway Pioneer Regiment. He was mentioned in Lord Kitchener's Despatches (8 March 1902), and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "William Digby Oswald, Lieutenant, 3rd Railway Pioneer Regiment. For services during operations in South Africa". viz: the rescue of a Native Scout on 31 January, the enemy being close to him, and pursuing for some miles. So reticent was he in some matters pertaining to himself, that it is doubtful if even his most intimate friends ever knew for what special act of gallantry he was awarded this high distinction. After the South African War he began mining in South Africa. He served also as Captain and Adjutant of Royston's Horse in the Natal Rebellion in 1906, and was wounded in fierce bush fighting in Zululand. He continued mining in Rhodesia until May 1914, and lived at Bulawayo. On the outbreak of the European War he joined the 5th Dragoon Guards (Special Reserve), as Lieutenant, on 7 August 1914, and a week later went to France with the 1st Cavalry Brigade. He was in the Retreat from Mons, and took part, in the Battles of the Maine and the Aisne. He was wounded at Messines on 31 October 1914, and was sent home. In May 1915, eager to get to the front again, he was attached as Captain to the Royal Field Artillery, and was with the 3rd Division in the heavy righting round Ypres. After serving on the Staff as ADC to Major General J A L Haldane, and as Assistant Provost-Marshal (for which he was mentioned in Despatches), he was, in December 1915, appointed Second-in-Command of the 12th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment, and in March 1916, took over the command. He took part in much fighting at St Eloi, and in the early stages of the Battle of the Somme. On 14 July 1916, the 3rd Division took part in a highly successful attack on the ridge between Bazen-tin-le-Petit and Longueval, and Lieutenant Colonel Oswald (his promotion was gazetted posthumously [London Gazette of October 12, 1916], and also mentioned in Despatches after his death), was struck in the chest by a misfire from an English gun (a tragic Incident—he had seen that the gun was wrongly focussed during the day, and had sent orders to that effect), and, after seeming to make a good recovery, sank rapidly and died on 16 July 1916. Major General Haldane, commanding the 3rd Division, wrote: "His loss I feel much personally, but still more as Commanding Officer, for a man like him was worth a battalion of infantry". Another officer wrote: "I always thought it an extremely sporting thing to give up a pleasant post such as Assistant Provost-Marshal, and take on infantry work in the trenches". In dedicating a memorial tablet to his memory at Victoria, Rhodesia, Canon Ashworth told how junior officers vied with each other to serve under him, and how his servant three months after Colonel Oswald's death broke down completely in describing his life in the trenches with his men and the way in which he met his death. He had lived a life of movement and adventure; he was a very good horseman, a keen polo player, and loved big game shooting in Rhodesia, but, perhaps, the Great War brought out what was best, in him. "One who never turned his back, but marched breast forward, Never doubted clouds would break, Never dreamed, though right were worsted, wrong would triumph. Held we fall to rise, are baffled to fight better, Sleep to wake". The officers of the 5th Dragoons and his friends in the 3rd Division intend to erect a memorial, in the form of a drinking fountain for animals, in Surrey or Dorset. Lieutenant Oswald had married, on 7 March 1905, at St John's Church, Weymouth, Dorset, Catherine Mary, daughter of the Reverend J Scott Yardley, of St Chad's, Shrewsbury, and Mary Yardley (maiden name, Loxdale), and there were three daughters: Theodora Betty; Ambrosine Mary, and Patricia Catherine.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Railway Pioneer Regiment
OttleyGeorge FredericMajorOTTLEY, GEORGE FREDERIC, Major, was born 15 July 1860, son of George Lethbridge Ottley, late of the 44th Regiment, and Lucy, daughter of John Isbell, MD. He joined the Royal Wiltshire Militia 8 May 1878 and was given a commission as Second Lieutenant, 105th Light Infantry, 17 April 1880, becoming Lieutenant 10 November 1880, and Captain, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, 24 October 1885. He served at home from 17 April 1880 to 26 December 1884; at Malta from 27 December 1884 to 17 February 1887, and in India 18 February 1887 to 2 May 1892. From 2 March 1888 to 1 March 1892, he was Adjutant, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, serving with the 2nd Battalion with the Zhob and Ziderzai Expedition, and as Staff Officer of the Vihowa Column. He was again on home service 3 May 1892 to 9 December 1894, and then in India until 5 March 1899, serving as Acting Adjutant 14 February to 29 October 1895, and Officiating Station Staff Officer, 1st Class, 25 October 1896 to 12 July 1897; was with the Tirah Expeditionary Force, and present at the action of Shin Kaniar. He received the India Medal with two clasps. He was promoted Major 8 June 1898; served in Mauritius 6 March to 3 October 1899, and in the South African war from 4 October 1899 to 17 March 1900. He was present in the advance on Kimberley, and the battles of Belmont, Enslin and Modder River. At Modder River he was severely wounded (gunshot wound, right wrist [Colles fracture]; shell wound, head; multiple gun-shot wounds, left leg [leg amputated]). He received the Queen's South African Medal with two clasps; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June 1902]: "George Frederic Ottley, Major, Yorkshire Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 18 December 1902. He was Recruiting Staff Officer, 2nd Class, London, 20 July 1900 to 19 July 1905; was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 19 July 1902. Lieutenant Colonel Ottley was compulsorily retired on appointment as Assistant to Officer in Command of Records 19 July 1905, and held this post until 31 August 1914. During the European War he was Supervisor of Infantry Record Office, War Office, 1 September 1914 to 10 August 1916; Officer in Charge of Infantry Records from 10 August 1916, until replaced on account of illness 29 December 1917. He was mentioned to the Secretary of State for War, for valuable services rendered during the European War, 24 February 1917.
DSO, IGS 1895 (2) P-F 1897-98 Tirah, QSA (2) Bel M-R. KOYLI Regimental Museum 1992.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Yorkshire Light Infantry
OuseleyRalph GlynnMajorOUSELEY, RALPH GLYNN, Major, was born 5 May 1866; joined the Royal Artillery, as Lieutenant, 17 February 1886; was promoted Captain 7 April 1896; was made Major 16 January 1901; served in South Africa, 1899-1902; during operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop; was present at the defence of Ladysmith, including action of 6 January 1900; during operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); during operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Belfast (26 to 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901], and received the Queen's and King's Medals with four clasps; was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Ralph Glynn Ouseley, Major, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services in the recent operations in South Africa". He acted as Magistrate in Pretoria (Transvaal), 19 July 1902 to 15 September 1902; was employed on Special Extra-Regimental Duties under the Civil Government, Transvaal, from 16 September 1902 to 30 September 1904. He became Lieutenant Colonel 5 May 1913. He served in the European War from 1914; was wounded, mentioned in Despatches, created a CMG in 1915, and a CB in 1916; was Temporary Brigadier General, RA, 17th Division, British Expeditionary Force, British Armies in France, 3 January to 8 August 1916; Brigadier General, RA, 59th Division, Home Forces; British Armies in France, 7 November 1916 to 21 April 1917; Brigadier General, RA, 61st Division, British Armies in France, 22 April 1917. He married, in 1899, Peggy Harriet O'Donnell.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
Owen-LewisArthur FrancisLieutenantOWEN-LEWIS, ARTHUR FRANCIS, Lieutenant, was born 6 August 1868, eldest son of Henry Owen-Lewis, DL, of Inniskeen, Count Monaghan, MP, County Carlow. He joined the Yorkshire Regiment 8 June 1889, becoming Lieutenant 28 July 1892, and was Adjutant, 6th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers (Militia) from 1 July 1898. He served in the South African War, 1900-2, as District Commandant; served as Adjutant, 6th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, 10 February 1900 to 14 October 1901. He took part in operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, Orange Free State and Transvaal, March to 29 November 1900; operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, from 30 November 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Arthur Francis Owen-Lewis, Lieutenant, Yorkshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He retired 25 July 1907, and became Major, Reserve of Officers, 23 January 1914. Major Owen-Lewis served in the European War, 1914-18, as GSO, Irish Command and AQMG France; was mentioned in Despatches twice, and awarded the OBE in 1918. He was appointed Inspector of Prisons for Ireland. In 1896 he married Kathleen, daughter of William Henry, of Tivoli, County Dublin.
DSO, OBE (1st m), QSA (3) CC OFS Trans (Capt, York Regt), KSA (2) (Capt DSO, Yorks Regt), BWM, Victory Medal with MID (Lt Col). Spink 1964 £32. Lovell 1978 est £330. Dixon 1987 £875.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Princess of Wales's Own) Yorkshire Regiment
Owen-LewisCyril AlexanderMajorOWEN-LEWIS, CYRIL ALEXANDER, Major, joined the Cape Colony Cyclists' Corps, and served in the South African War of 1899-1902. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "P A Owen-Lewis, Major, Cape Colonial Cyclists' Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The London Gazette of 13 May 1904, says that Major Owen-Lewis's initials were not 'P A' but 'C A' — Cyril Alexander. Major Owen-Lewis was later Member for Beaufort West in the Cape Parliament. He died of pneumonia in London. His brother was Major A F Lewis, DSO.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Cape Colony Cyclist Corps
PagetHaroldLieutenant ColonelPAGET, HAROLD, Brevet Colonel, was born 9 September 1849, son of Leopold G Paget (son of the Honourable Berkeley Paget) and Georgina, daughter of the Reverend J F Moore Halsey, of Gaddesden Park, Hertfordshire. He was educated at Wellington, and was gazetted to the 10th Foot as Ensign 23 January 1869, becoming Cornet, 18th Hussars, on the same date, and Cornet, 7th Hussars, 27 February 1869; Lieutenant 22 February 1871. He was ADC to the GOC, Eastern District, 1873-77; promoted to Captain 23 July 1879; extra ADC to the Viceroy of Ireland, 1879-81. Captain Paget served in the Sudan, 1884-85, in the Nile Expedition, as Adjutant, Light Camel Regiment, and was present at the affair at Abu Klea on 17 February (slightly wounded). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 25 August 1885]; was given the Brevet of Major 15 June 1885; received the Medal with clasp and the Bronze Star. He became Major 5 May 1886, and in the same year passed the Staff College; was Brigade Major, Cavalry, Aldershot, 1888-91; Military Secretary to the Provincial Commander-in-Chief, Bombay, 1893; promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 26 January 1895, commanding the 7th Hussars from 1895 to 1899. In 1896-97 he served in the Matabeleland Campaign; was mentioned in Despatches 9 March 1897, and created a CB, and on 26 June 1899, was given the Brevet of Colonel. He served in South Africa in command of a battalion of Imperial Yeomanry (Paget's Horse) in 1900. Some of Paget's Horse were present at the action at Faber's Put, by which Sir C Warren crushed the rebellion in Griqualand. When the Boers attacked Lichtenburg on 3 March 1901, the defenders were 600 in number, consisting of Paget's Horse and three companies of the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. The attack was made by Delarey, Smuts and Colliers, with 1,500 men. Sir A Conan Doyle says, in 'The Great Boer War' (page 440), that a garrison made up of "less sturdy material might have been overborne by the vigour of the attack. As it was, the garrison were driven to their last trench, but held out under very heavy fire all day, and next morning the Boers abandoned the attack. Their losses appear to have been over fifty in number, and included Commandant Celliers, who was badly wounded and afterwards taken prisoner at Warm Baths. The brave garrison lost fourteen killed, including two officers of the Northumberlands, and twenty wounded". Colonel Paget also performed the duties of Commandant at Ottoshoop. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 27 September 1901], and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Harold Paget, CB, Lieutenant Colonel and Brevet Colonel, Commanding the 19th Battalion imperial Yeomanry, in recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in India, and presented there 15 May 1902. Colonel Paget retired 26 June 1904.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
19th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
PaineAlbert IngrahamCaptainPAINE, ALBERT INGRAHAM, Captain, was born 12 January 1874, son of Hammon Paine, and of Helen Paine. He was educated at Harrow and Sandhurst, and joined the King's Royal Rifle Corps 10 December 1894. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, with the 1st Battalion Mounted Infantry, of which he was Adjutant 1900-2; promoted Captain June 1901. He was twice mentioned in Despatches, and for his services in the 1st Mounted Infantry during the South African War of 1899-1902 was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Albert Ingraham Paine, Captain, King's Royal Rifle Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He resigned his commission April 1905; rejoined 7 September 1914, and was given command of the 12th (Service) Battalion King's Royal Rifles, 21 October 1914, serving in the European War, 1914-18. He was twice mentioned in Despatches; created CMG June 1916. Lieutenant Colonel Paine married, 21 February 1906, Elsie Caroline, fourth daughter of Philip Wykeham, of Tythrop House, Thame, Oxon, and they had two children: Susan, born 10 May 1907, and Rosemary, born 19 February 1917.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Royal Rifle Corps
PalmerArthur PercyLieutenantPALMER, ARTHUR PERCY, Lieutenant, served in the South African War with the Imperial Yeomanry and South African Constabulary. For his services he received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Arthur Percy Palmer, Lieutenant, 11th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC, Transvaal, 3 February 1903, and presented by the GOC, South Africa, at Pretoria, 25 March 1903. He became Lieutenant, Reserve of 0fficers and Captain Reserve Cavalry. He was killed in action 27 September 1915.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
11th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
PalmesGeorge ChampneyMajorPALMES, GEORGE CHAMPNEY, Major, was born 9 February 1857, third son of Venerable James Palmes, DD. He entered the Army 10 September 1875, as Sub-Lieutenant, unattached, and the 24th Foot 10 September 1875; becoming Lieutenant, South Wales Borderers, 10 September 1877, and serving in the South African War of 1877-78-79, taking part in the Kaffir Campaign. Operations against the Galekas, Battle of Quintana (Medal and clasp). He was promoted to Captain 9 June 1882; was Adjutant, Volunteers, 1 October 1891 to 30 September 1895, and became Major 9 June 1892. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; was Commandant at Klerksdorp, and took part in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1903, including actions at Karee Siding, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including the action near Johannesburg. Operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, August to 29 November 1900. Operations in Orange River Colony, June to August 1900. Operations in the Transvaal, 30 November 1900 to May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "George Champney Palmes, Major, South Wales Borderers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to Lord Kitchener in South Africa, and were presented by Brigadier General Barber at Klerksdorp 16 March 1902. Major Palmes retired 23 July 1902. He married Mary Lowndes, widow of C Faber.
DSO, SAGS (0)(Lt 1-24th Foot), QSA (3) CC OFS Joh (Maj DSO, SWB), KSA (2) (Maj DSO, SWB).Glendinings 1963 £22. Lovell 1978 est £475. DNW 1999 est £1,500-2,000.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South Wales Borderers
PalmesGerald LindsayCaptainPALMES, GERALD LINDSAY, Captain, was born 18 August 1864, sixth son of Venerable Archdeacon James Palmes, DD. He was educated at Aysgarth and Uppingham, and was gazetted Second Lieutenant, Royal Lancaster Regiment, 12 September 1888; became Lieutenant 22 December 1889; was Adjutant, Royal Lancaster Regiment, 5 May 1897 to 25 August 1897, and Captain 23 March 1898. Captain Palmes served in the South African War, 1899 to 1902; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 1900 (dangerously wounded 27 February). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Gerald Lindsay Palmes, Captain, Royal Lancashire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. Captain Palmes retired 1 October 1906. He served as Grade 3 Staff Officer, August 1914 to July 1917; was mentioned in Despatches, 1917, and retired, owing to ill-health, July 1917. He married, in 1897, Inez Charlotte, daughter of Albyn Saunders, 9th Lancers.
[DSO], QSA (2) T-H RofL (Capt, R Lancs Regt). Spinks 1969 £15. Glendinings 1982.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Royal Lancaster Regiment
PanetHenri AlexandreCaptainPANET, HENRI ALEXANDRE, Captain, was born 24 July 1869, son of Colonel Charles Eugene Panet. He graduated at the Royal Military College of Canada, and served in the South African War, 1899-1900, and was present at the Relief of Mafeking. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April 1901]; was given the Brevet of Major, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Henri Alexandre Panet, Captain, Royal Canadians. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the Commandant, Royal Military College, Canada. He was Staff Adjutant, Royal Military College of Canada, 1901-5; AAG, 1905-7; DAG, 1907-9. He was promoted to Colonel, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery; served in the European War; was wounded and mentioned in Despatches; became Brigadier General; was created a CMG in 1916, and a CB in 1919. He married, in 1902, Mary A, youngest daughter of James Bermingham, of Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Canada contingent
ParkerFrancis Maitland WybornCaptainPARKER, FRANCIS MAITLAND WYBORN, Captain, was born 18 September 1876, eldest son of Chief Justice Sir Henry Parker KCMG and Amy Katherine, daughter of G W Leake, QC. He was educated at Perth High School, Western Australia; admitted a Barrister and Solicitor of the Supreme Court of West Australia in 1899. He served in the South African Campaign, 1899-1902, with the West Australian Mounted Infantry; was Embarkation Staff Officer, Staff of the Base, Cape Town, 1931-2, and was present at the actions at Vet River; operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900, including the actions at Colesberg. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April 1901]: "Francis Maitland Wyborn Parker, Captain, West Australian Mounted Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". (Insignia, etc, sent to Commander-in-Chief in South Africa, and presented in South Africa by Major General A Wynne, CB, 19 November 1901). He was given the Brevet of Major in 1902. He served in the European War, and an obituary notice in the 'Times' said: "On the 17th March 1915, at Mena Camp, Cairo, after a short illness, Captain and Brevet Major Francis Maitland Wyborn Parker, DSO, Imperial Force, Egypt, elder son of the Honourable Sir Stephen Parker, KCMG. He had married, in 1901, Jessie Dorothy, daughter of J Stenhouse, of Melbourne, Victoria".
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
West Australia contingent
ParryHenry JulesCaptainPARRY, HENRY JULES, Captain, was born 5 February 1867. He was educated for the medical profession, and became Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps, 29 July 1890. Captain Parry served in the South African War, 1899-1902, taking part in the Relief of Ladysmith, including the action of Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900) and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in the Transvaal in Orange River Colony; operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal, September 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Henry Jules Parry, MB, Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 18 December 1902. He became Major 27 July 1902, and retired 29 July 1910. He served in the European War, 1914-19; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1918, and created a CBE in 1919. Lieutenant Colonel Parry married, in 1899, Helen Dorothea Elizabeth Cockburn, daughter of Robert Pitcairn, Barrister-at-Law.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
ParryLlewellyn England SidneyCaptainPARRY, LLEWELLYN ENGLAND SIDNEY, Captain, was born in 1856, only son of Richard Parry, Royal Scots Greys, and Louisa, eldest daughter of Sir Richard England, GCB. He was educated at Rugby, and Trinity College, Oxford, and served in the South African War, 1899-1901; was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Llewellyn England Sidney Parry, Captain, 9th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 17 December 1901. He became Lieutenant Colonel and Honorary Colonel Denbighshire Hussars, and was created a CBE in 1919. Colonel Parry married, in 1880, Mary Sophia, second daughter of Sir Richard P Puleston, 3rd Baronet.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
9th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
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