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 Surname   Forename   No   Rank   Notes   Unit 
DyerR HSource: QSA and KSA rollsDEOVR
DyerR H52TrooperList of medals returned from Cape Town
Source: QSA medal roll in WO100/246
Colonial Light Horse
DyerRichard HeathSource: WO100/286Victoria East DMT
DyerRobert1206TrooperServed in 1st KFS. Joined Durban 25 Apr 01 transferred 29 Apr 01 2KFS
Source: Nominal roll in WO127
Kitchener's Fighting Scouts
DyerRobert1206TrooperServed in 2nd KFS. Joined Durban 25 Apr 01 Discharged 28 Nov 01 time expired
Source: Nominal roll in WO127
Kitchener's Fighting Scouts
DyerS6024PrivateDied of disease. Elandsfontein, 29 October 1901
1st Battalion. 21 Ml
Source: South African Field Force Casualty Roll
Royal Sussex Regiment
DyerS6024Private1st Battalion
Demise: Died of disease 29 Oct 1901
Place: Elandsfontein
Source: In Memoriam by S Watt
Royal Sussex Regiment
DyerS1st Battalion
Source: QSA and KSA medal rolls
Gloucestershire Regiment
DyerSSource: Medal rollsDorsetshire Regiment
DyerS2nd Battalion
Source: QSA and KSA medal rolls
Gloucestershire Regiment
DyerS B BLieutenantHe was born 26 November 1875, in London, son of Captain Stewart John Dyer, late The Buffs (youngest son of Sir Thomas Swinnerton Dyer, 9th Baront, of Westcroft Park, Chobham, Surrey).  His parents came of old Wiltshire families; the Dyers held lands in Wilts (Heytesbury and Somerset) before 1400, most of which they lost fighting for Charles I, whose successor, Charles II, created the Baronetcy.  The Dyers have been mostly soldiers, and have fought through the Peninsular and Crimean Wars and the Indian Mutiny.  His mother belonged to the Bythesea family, which has owned the Weeke House estate since the time of James I.  He was educated by a private tutor, and at Balliol College, Oxford, and joined the 4th Battalion Royal Minister Fusiliers (Kerry Militia) 9 February 1894, and served during four trainings.  He joined the 2nd Life Guards 5 January 1899.  In June 1899, Lieutenant Dyer was seconded for service in Northern Nigeria, where he took part in (1) the Kaduna Expedition, 1900 (Despatches; Medal and clasp); (2) the Bornu Expedition, and operations in the Wurkum Hills and Bassama country, 1902 (wounded; Despatches; Medal and clasp).  The London Gazette of 24 April 1903, contained Sir F Lugard's Despatches, dated from Mureji, 16 August 1902, with reference to the Expedition to Bornu, and the operations which resulted in the capture of the ex-Emir of Kontagora, as well as other expeditions in Northern Nigeria.  The Expedition, under Colonel Morland, started from Ibi (which is three hundred miles up the Benue from Lokoja) at the end of January.  After subjugating the Yerguins, a turbulent hill tribe, Colonel Morland was attacked beyond Bautshi on the 16th February by a strong force of some seven hundred dervishes dressed in the "Jibbeh", followers of the Mallam Jibrella, who called himself the Mahdi, and had long been the firebrand of that part of the Protectorate, and hitherto invariably victorious.  The enemy was defeated with great loss, and the pursuit resulted in the capture of the Mallam by Lieutenant Dyer, who—as Colonel Morland relates— "rode seventy miles in seventeen hours, with ten men only, and was back at Gujba in forty-two hours; a remarkable performance indeed in a roadless country".  In the difficult operations which followed the Bassama and the Wurkum and Djen tribes were defeated in several actions, until they sued for peace".  Sir F D Lugard adds: "I concur in the selection of officers made by Colonel Morland for special mention, viz: ..  Lieutenant Dyer, an officer who has always been distinguished for intrepidity and dash".  For his services in this expedition Lieutenant Dyer received the Medal and clasp.  He was wounded.  (3) He served in the Kano-Sokoto Expedition in 1903; wounded.  The "Daily Mail" of 16 February 1903, said: "The following telegram was received late on Friday night by the Colonial Office from the Governor, Sir F D Lugard: "Fifty miles from Zaria, 8 February Kano occupied by Colonel Morland, 3 February Lieutenant S B B Dyer, 2nd Life Guards, severely wounded, sword-cuts, wrists".  Kano was occupied on 3 February, after considerable fighting, the enemy defending the walls, which were 15 feet high, and proof against millimetre shell.  After a fruitless bombardment of the main gate, the British troops stormed a smaller gate a mile off.  Lieutenant Dyer (2nd Life Guards) led the storming party with great gallantry, and was twice wounded.  The operations were entirely under Colonel Morland, and were brilliantly carried out.  He mentioned the splendid work of the Mounted Infantry, under Lieutenants Porter and Wright, and especially commends Major McClintock, Major Cubitt, Lieutenant Dyer and Mr Wallace, the Deputy Commissioner.  For his services in this expedition Lieutenant Dyer received a clasp; was twice mentioned in Despatches, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 11 September 1903]: "Lieutenant (Local Captain) Stewart Barton Bythesea Dyer, 2nd Life Guards, West African Frontier Force.  In recognition of services with the Kano-Sokoto Expedition".  (4) He was in command of the Dakakari Expedition, 1904 (Despatches and clasp).  A report dated 18 April 1904, by Captain R H Goodwin, says: "Orderly Room, 1st Battalion, Northern Nigeria Regiment, West African Frontier Force.  I have much pleasure in conveying to you HE's congratulations and appreciation of the manner in which the operations recently performed by you in Dakakari were carried out".  HE Colonel Sir Frederick Lugard, KCMG, writes: "I should have liked to express my congratulations to Captain Dyer (1) on the success of his expedition; (2) on its small cost; (3) on the maps and itineraries.  A commander who succeeds in all these three points is ideal.  The expedition seems to have been carried out in a very gallant, effective, and at the same time humane manner.  I am particularly glad to see that my suggestions as to disarmament and as to giving towns sufficient warning to let women and non-combatants escape were given effect to, and also that the troops are remaining for a while in the country".  Major Dyer retired in January 1910, and joined the Special Reserve of Officers, the Wiltshire Militia.  He was prospective Liberal candidate for Salisbury, 1912.  He was Intelligence Officer on the Staff at Weymouth, 1914-15, and was awarded the War Badge, September 1916, for services rendered.  He was appointed Military Attache, British Embassy at Madrid, in the autumn of 1915; but ill-health compelled him to relinquish the appointment for that of Honorary Attache, having failed to satisfy the Medical Board.  He retired from the Reserve of Officers, owing to ill-health, in January 1917, and died 26 January 1917, at his flat near the British Embassy, Madrid.  He was buried in the English Cemetery outside the town.  Captain Dyer married, on 11 June 1900, at St George's Church, Hanover Square, London, Mai, only child of Captain S L Osborne, RN, and their son was Thomas Musgrave Swinnerton Dyer, born 5 July 1907.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Life Guards
DyerTSource: Medal rollsCape Railway Sharpshooters
DyerTSource: WO100/231City Imperial Volunteers
DyerT869PrivateDemise: Died of disease - enteric fever 03 Jun 1900
Place: Heilbron
Source: In Memoriam by S Watt
City Imperial Volunteers
DyerT869PrivateDied of disease. Heilbron, 3 June 1900
Source: South African Field Force Casualty Roll
City Imperial Volunteers
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